Rural round-up

April 6, 2015

Helicopter pilot Simon Spencer-Bower sets high farming and flying standards – Tim Cronshaw:

As a boy Simon Spencer-Bower would crane his neck to the sky to watch the crop dusters flying over his family farm at Eyrewell.

The deep impression their aerial feats made on the youngster was to set him on a lifetime of flying with a healthy mix of farming.

As soon as he left school he gained his fixed-wing pilot license in 1967, aged 18. . .

Anti-dairying rhetoric is out-dated :

Farmers don’t want weaker environmental policies. Ten years ago we were fair game for the ‘dirty dairying’ remarks by Fish & Game, today not so much.

Bryce Johnson recently said his organisation has moved on – that they are not anti-dairying, but rather they are anti-dairying that is harming the environment. But the question remains, why is the focus on dairying, as opposed to any other activity that harms the environment?

Environmental compliance and reducing farming’s impact is now an everyday part of a dairy farmer’s business.  We know there are a few ratbags out there – every industry has them – but while some regional councils try to clean up the tail-end of our industry they overlook their cousins in their own backyards. . .

Otago Regional Council blindsides ratepayers:

Federated Farmers is calling on the Otago Regional Council to properly inform and explain themselves to their ratepayer farmers who are facing huge increases in rates and consent costs this year.

“The Otago Regional Council needs to be held to account on their Long Term Plan consultation document, which is severely lacking in reasoning for their major increase in farmer rates,” Says Stephen Korteweg, Federated Farmers Otago provincial president.

“The Council is proposing a heap of big changes such as new water quality targeted rates for water monitoring, a new dairy monitoring targeted rate, and significant increases in the consent fees they charge all of which will mean increased costs for farmers. For many this will run into the thousands of dollars.” . .

No bull in proper effluent management – Chris Lewis:

I never thought when I entered farming politics that there would be so much talk about the stuff that comes out of the back end of a cow.  The polite term is ‘effluent’ of course; not polite are its effects and the costs of managing it.

Waikato Federated Farmers has the task of holding our regional council to account when warranted, and effluent is a big bone of contention. But they have a job to do, as we do, so it’s sometimes important we celebrate them. Just as farmers often feel criticised by the media, I imagine councils do too, giving the public an ill-informed perspective. . .

  Top farm business an industry leader:

An Omarama couple who run a traditional high country combination of merino ewes and cattle with hydroelectricity generation for good measure have won the Canterbury Ballance Farm Environment Awards.

Richard and Annabelle Subtil were the supreme winners announced at a ceremony on Thursday after amassing section awards for innovation, integrated management, soil management and water quality.

They run the 12,000 hectare Omarama Station, a family-owned property previously farmed by Annabelle’s parents Dick and Beth Wardell.

South of Omarama village, the Mackenzie Country property winters 23,000 stock units, including 7500 merino ewes and 310 angus-hereford cows. . .

Earth greening despite deforestation – Albert Van Dijk & Pep Canadell:

WHILE the news coming out of forests is often dominated by deforestation and habitat loss, research published in Nature Climate Change shows that the world has actually got greener over the past decade.

Despite ongoing deforestation in South America and South East Asia, we found that the decline in these regions has been offset by recovering forests outside the tropics, and new growth in the drier savannas and shrublands of Africa and Australia.

Plants absorb around a quarter of the carbon dioxide that people release into the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels. With a greening globe, more plants may mean more absorption of carbon dioxide. If so, this will slow but not stop climate change. . .


Rural round-up

December 18, 2014

Alarm over off-road toll -Timothy Brown:

Federated Farmers Otago president says children on four-wheeled bikes are a reality of rural life despite damning statistics and some calling for a ban.

A report released yesterday said off-road vehicle accidents accounted for the second-highest number of recreational deaths of children, behind only swimming and other water activities.

The findings focused on four-wheeled bikes, which accounted for more than a third of the deaths, and highlighted children’s vulnerability when using vehicles designed for adults.

Federated Farmers Otago president Stephen Korteweg said the statistics were ”pretty alarming”, but the practicalities of farm life meant children would continue to drive off-road vehicles, and particularly four-wheeled bikes. . .

Quads Bikes Not for Under 16s

Safekids Aotearoa strongly supports recommendations made in a report released today highlighting the dangers posed by quad bikes when ridden or controlled by children who are under 16 years of age.

The Child & Youth Mortality Review Committee (CYMRC) report ‘Child and youth mortality from motorcycle, quad bike and motorised agricultural vehicle use’ looked into 33 child deaths caused by off road motor vehicles from 2001-2012. This includes 12 deaths caused by quad bikes.

According to Safekids Aotearoa, 30 children die or are hospitalised every year as a result of quad bike injuries. . .

Minister welcomes predator control venture:

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry has welcomed an innovative partnership to dramatically transform the way invasive predators are managed on mainland New Zealand.

The NEXT Foundation has partnered with philanthropists Gareth Morgan and Sam Morgan, and the Department of Conservation, to set up the Zero Invasive Predators (ZIP) project. All parties are contributing funding to the venture, with DOC providing $500,000 per year for an initial three years.

The ZIP project will focus on developing the tools and systems needed to permanently remove introduced predators from large areas of mainland New Zealand. . . .

Zespri forecasts record grower returns for 2014/15 season:

Record per-hectare returns for Green and Organic Green are forecast this season as a combination of supply constraint, favourable market conditions and strong end-of-season sales leads to increased Zespri grower returns across all categories. Per-hectare returns for Green growers are forecast at $52,987 and Organic Green at $42,207.

Zespri Chief Executive Lain Jager says these returns are the result of great work from growers, the post-harvest sector, the Zespri team onshore and in the markets, and our retail and trade partners.

Mr Jager explains the overall result reflects some unique, one-off factors. “A shortage of supply of Green kiwifruit from Chile and constrained supply of Gold kiwifruit from New Zealand have supported pricing, while Zespri’s foreign exchange hedging policy has mitigated against the strong value of the New Zealand dollar.” . . .

 

Time for Jobs that Count in the Meat Industry:

The NZ Meat Workers Union will launch a new national campaign to highlight job insecurity in the Meat Industry this afternoon in Palmerston North.

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, National Secretary.

“Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements.

“As if that’s not enough, the government’s recent Employment Law changes mean meat workers will face a tougher time settling collective agreements and earning a decent living. . .

Celebrating 30 years in business:

New Zealand’s largest animal feed exporter and world-leading fibre nutrition company, Fiber Fresh Feeds, is celebrating 30 years in business by giving away nearly ten tonne of feed to horse riders at one of the country’s biggest equine events.

As the naming right sponsor of the Fiber Fresh Taupo Christmas Classic from December 18-21, New Zealand’s second largest equestrian event behind Horse of the Year and the largest event by horse number in the Southern Hemisphere, Fiber Fresh is giving a free bag of feed to each of the 450 riders at the event. . .

Farmer AKA Mechanic, Agronomist, Engineer, Economist, Businessman, Accountant, Architect, Doctor,  Manager, Electrician, Plumber, Veterinarian, Market Analyst, Meteorologist, Communicator, Teacher, Conservationist, Nutritionist, Carpenter, Biologist, Technician, Trucker, Maintenance worker, etc. (PETERSON FARM BROS ORIGINAL)

Farmer AKA Mechanic, Agronomist, Engineer, Economist, Businessman, Accountant, Architect, Doctor, Manager, Electrician, Plumber, Veterinarian, Market Analyst, Meteorologist, Communicator, Teacher, Conservationist, Nutritionist, Carpenter, Biologist, Technician, Trucker, Maintenance worker, etc.

(PETERSON FARM BROS ORIGINAL)


Rural round-up

March 8, 2014

Otago water plan appeals resolved:

The appeals of Federated Farmers and others on Otago Regional Council’s Plan Change 6A (Water Quality) have been constructively resolved for farming and the environment.

“Otago Regional Council’s Plan Change 6A is now a reality,” says Stephen Korteweg, Federated Farmers Otago provincial president.

“On paper, at least, it offers a roadmap for maintaining or improving water quality in Otago. Now the hard work of implementing the plan begins. . .

What’s good for the farmer also proves good for the environment – Jamie Gray:

In Canterbury, the cockies are only half joking when they say they’re into hydroponics.

For dairy farmers, once they have the land it’s just a matter of adding water, the right feed, nutrients and cows and the result is milk. Lots of it.

In some parts of the province, you only have to dig down a few centimetres before hitting gravel and soil can vary widely in depth and quality.

Dairying does have an impact on the environment and it is heavily reliant on irrigation. So it comes as no surprise that water usage and quality is a hot topic in the region and the nation in general. . .

New posting to boost MPI presence in the Middle East:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has welcomed the creation of a new position for an Agricultural Counsellor to be based in Dubai.

The announcement has been made as part of the Minister’s current visit to Saudi Arabia, Oman and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

“This new position is the latest step by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to increase its presence in the Middle East. It recognises the growing importance of the New Zealand relationship with the region and will provide further support for New Zealand exporters,” says Mr Guy.

“Based in Dubai, the position will cover key markets in the Middle East and seek to advance our trade and economic relationships. The position will also contribute to New Zealand’s strategy to develop strong government and private sector relationships with the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). . .

Why wait till disaster strikes? – Katie Milne:

Ten years ago last month, the Manawatu suffered flooding in scenes eerily similar to what we saw in Britain and now Christchurch.  That 2004 flood event cost $300 million with Palmerston North coming within a hair’s breadth of disaster. 

In Britain, a former head of its Environment Agency dismissively said of Somerset’s flood management: “I’d like to see a limpet mine put on every pumping station.”  The UK’s Environment Agency acts like a huge regional council for England and Wales on flood and coastal management.  Its embattled head, Lord Smith, now faces headlines like this: “Environment Agency bosses spent £2.4million on PR… but refused £1.7million dredging of key Somerset rivers that could have stopped flooding.”

In October 2010, the late Horizons Regional Councillor, David Meads, told the Manawatu Standard that the Resource Management Act made it harder for his council to deliver its core business of flood protection:  “…that $6 million saved Palmerston North…But the work lower down, on the tributaries, was way behind. As we found out in 2004.”  Farmers felt shut out on consultation on flood and drainage schemes yet, “they were the people whose gumboots overflowed when heavy rain caused flooding on the plains.” In Christchurch, I guess we can add homeowners. . .

Husband and Wife to be tested in Kaikohe:

The Northern Regional Final of ANZ Young Farmer Contest will see husband and wife Rachel and Robert Cashmore of Papakura, battle it out in Kaikohe, Saturday 15 March.

The couple, along with six other competitors, will be vying for a place at the Grand Final and their share of $14,000 in prizes from ANZ, Lincoln University, Silver Fern Farms, AGMARDT, Ravensdown, Honda, Husqvarna and Vodafone.

The events begin with the practical day at the Kaikohe Showgrounds which will test competitors’ skills, strength and stamina. There will be a variety of hands-on, physical and theoretical challenges – all with an agricultural and farming focus.. .

Fieldays seeks agricultural innovators:

The highly regarded Fieldays Innovation Competition is back after yet another ground breaking year which saw previous entrants finding fame and fortune.

The most innovative competition in the agricultural industry is now open for 2014 and organisers are urging inventors to enter their rural innovations in the distinguished competition held annually at Fieldays, the Southern Hemisphere’s largest agribusiness expo.

The competition celebrates New Zealand ingenuity by showcasing the latest innovations, backyard inventions and commercial improvements, with thousands of Fieldays visitors eager to view the latest rural advancements. . .

Years of Dedication Sees Double Award Win for Goat Cheesemaker:

Rural Waikato cheesemaker Jeanne Van Kuyk is celebrating an incredible double win at the 2014 NZ Champions of Cheese Awards after claiming a highly sought-after supreme award and major category win.

Aroha Organic Goat Cheese cheesemaker, Jeanne, was presented with the Milk Test NZ Cheesemaker of the Year Award at a gala dinner and awards night held at The Langham, Auckland on Tuesday night (March 4).

While the certified organic, and GE free company is no stranger to award wins, this is the first time Aroha Organic Goat Cheese has taken out one of the coveted supreme titles. . .


Good rain or bad rain?

December 29, 2013

Wet weather almost certainly wasn’t what most people were wanting for Christmas, but bad rain for holiday makers was good rain for farmers:

In the past few days, 49mm of rain has fallen in Dunedin city, 26mm at Dunedin airport, 21mm in Balclutha, 19mm in Oamaru, 1mm in Alexandra, 5mm in Queenstown and 2mm in Wanaka. . .

Federated Farmers Otago president Stephen Korteweg said rain of a week ago was good, but the Christmas rain had been even better, and meant farmers could relax over the holiday period.

”It’s exactly what we needed as we were heading in the direction of getting a bit grim.”

Some farmers had been weaning lambs early but there was not the quality feed for them and Clydevale dairy farmers were starting to feed silage to stock and move to 16-hour milking.

”The rain is just what the doctor ordered. The ultimate Christmas present.”

Rain in the run up to Christmas allowed farmers in our area to turn irrigators off providing a very welcome break at just the right time.

That said, orchardists won’t be as happy as pastoral farmers because rain can split fruit.


Rural round-up

September 29, 2013

Renewed attack on AgResearch move – Annette Scott:

A move by AgResearch to push on with its restructuring plans has been labelled short-sighted and flawed by southern leaders, with jobs set to go in their regions.

The Crown research institute (CRI) proposed in July the relocation of hundreds of science and support roles from its centres at Ruakura, near Hamilton, and Invermay, near Dunedin, to bigger research hubs in Palmerston North and Lincoln.

This was in line with a planned $100 million investment in its campus infrastructure. . .

Relief over Invermay assurances support, uni link to be retained – Sally Rae:

Federated Farmers Otago president Stephen Korteweg says he is heartened by an assurance that dry stock farm system capability to support deer, sheep and beef farming will be retained at Invermay, and that AgResearch’s linkage with the University of Otago’s genetics team will be maintained.

In a statement this week, after AgResearch’s announcement it still intended to slash jobs at Invermay, Federated Farmers national vice-president William Rolleston said the rural lobby organisation supported the reconfiguration of AgResearch because of the need for ”modern progressive agricultural research centres of excellence”. . .

Purchaser found for Australian Business – Annette Scott:

Ravensdown has signed a conditional sale and purchase agreement for its failed Western Australia business.

The co-operative announced last week it was selling to Louis Dreyfus Group, which has been involved in the Australian market for many years.

Detail of the agreement is yet to be finalised.

Louis Dreyfus is a French company involved globally in agriculture, oil, energy and commodities, global processing, trading and merchandising, as well as international shipping. . .

“First Steps” – the best gift I’ve ever given myself – Eloise Neely:

I attended the Agri-Women’s Development Trust course in Whangarei with two goals, to make new friends and connections and seek guidance to reinvent myself after 20 years farming in the South Island.

First Steps is exactly what the name suggests, a group of rural women meeting to examine their feelings, values and visions to discover the first steps of the rest of their lives.

Who is a First Steps woman? She may be a farmer by choice or an “accidental” farmer, single or partnered and age is not a factor. A First Steps woman may be a rural professional or anyone with a connection to the land. She is often the unseen farming partner quietly raising the next generation and keeping small communities together. . .

Deer industry tipped to become ‘red hot‘ –

The deer industry will be ”red hot” next year, Stanfield’s European Red Deer Stud owner and ”Motivate” group chairman Clive Jermy, of Darfield, says.

Mr Jermy, Deer Industry New Zealand (DINZ) production manager Tony Pearse and New Zealand Deer Farmers Association (NZDFA) chairman Kris Orange , of Geraldine, are members of Motivate, a group putting together recommendations to encourage more people to enter the industry or to remain in it, to improve training and availability and to raise the industry’s profile.

Mr Jermy said the deer industry was an exciting one to be in. . .

Cow drowns in effluent on hellish road trip:

Two South Westland dairy farmers, a stock agent, a trucking company and two of its middle management have been prosecuted over a road trip suffered by 25 cows on the way to the slaughterhouse.

It is the first prosecution by the Ministry for Primary Industries under the Animal Welfare Transport Code.

At the heart of the case, which was part heard in the Greymouth District Court yesterday, was a cattle shipment from Whataroa and Hari Hari to the Silver Fern Farms meatworks in Hokitika on October 25 last year, which was then diverted to a freezing works at Belfast, in Christchurch. . .

Innovative wastewater system for wheatbelt:

Western Australia Water Minister Terry Redman has announced work had begun to connect Hyden residents to an innovative wastewater scheme, the first of its kind in WA.

The $3.6 million trial was supported by 90 per cent of the town during a community poll in 2011 and is part of the State Government’s infill sewerage program.

“Hyden’s STED system will take wastewater that has already been treated in household septic tanks through a pipeline system and to a disposal pond located outside of town,” Mr Redman said. . .


Rural round-up

July 4, 2013

To be or not to be questions for red meat: Speech by Jeanette Maxwell, Federated Farmers Meat & Fibre chairperson, to the 2013 Meat & Fibre Annual General Meeting, Ashburton

In writing my address to you today, where we will be discussing the biggest change red meat has faced for a generation, the first four lines from Shakespeare’s Hamlet come to mind. Especially since there seems to be something rotten in the state of our red-meat industry.

“To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether ’tis Nobler in the mind to suffer
The Slings and Arrows of outrageous Fortune,
Or to take Arms against a Sea of troubles…”

Right there I seem to have exhausted my knowledge of Shakespeare!

Suffice to say Hamlet was a tragedy, which is not what we want for New Zealand’s red meat sector. Yet those lines pretty much sum up the position we are in. Do we leave things to chance, or do we do something about it? . . .

New pastoral lease rent system bedding in:

Land Information Minister Maurice Williamson says 17 South Island High Country Crown pastoral leases are from this week on a new rent system.

There are 221 pastoral leases and each one has its rent reviewed every 11 years.

“The 17 leases were the first reviewed under new legislation (Crown Pastoral Land Amendment Act 2012) which bases rents on the earning capacity of the land and not on the value of the land exclusive of improvements. . .

Icebreaker Appoints Rob Fyfe as New Executive Chairman:

Rob Fyfe has stepped up his involvement in Icebreaker to become the Executive Chairman in September of this year.

Icebreaker founder and Chief Executive Officer Jeremy Moon says he is thrilled to have Rob Fyfe more involved in the business.

“The chairman’s role is critical and works very closely with the CEO to steer the ship and set the priorities and objectives of the business for the future. I can think of no one better than Rob to be able to do this, given his wealth of experience. . .

Winter storms sends farm feed prices soaring:

Winter storms which which dumped heavy snow through much of the South Island and left some areas under water have sent supplementary feed prices soaring.

Southern farmers have been warned that feed shortages could become an issue if they get hit with more wild winter weather.

Otago Federated Farmers president Stephen Korteweg says farmers in the south did not go into winter with big surpluses of hay or straw. . .

New research trial shows blueberries’ potential:

New research trial shows blueberries’ potential for reducing hyperglycemia, weight gain and cholesterol levels.

“The blueberry’s ability to intervene in conditions such as Type 2 diabetes and obesity is of critical importance,” says trial leader.

The results of a recently published research study highlight blueberries’ potential to play a significant role in helping to manage weight and prevent the onset of Type 2 diabetes. . .


Rural round-up

May 16, 2013

‘Big event’ could affect future of Otago farming – Sally Rae:

Farming is not going to get any easier as farmers meet the expectations of ”everybody outside of farming”, Federated Farmers Otago president Stephen Korteweg says.

The pressure on farmers to meet environmental expectations would be challenging.

”We are all going to have to lift our game and obviously some considerably more than others,” Mr Korteweg said in his annual report. The branch held its annual meeting in Milton yesterday. The ”big event” this year was the proposed changes to the Otago Regional Council’s water plan. Those changes could have a big impact on how farmers worked in the future. . . .

Bill Roest joins board of Synlait Milk:

Synlait Milk is pleased to announce the appointment of Bill Roest as a non-executive director. Mr Roest recently retired as Chief Financial Officer of one of New Zealand’s largest listed companies, Fletcher Building Ltd.

Synlait Milk chairman Graeme Milne says Mr Roest will bring a wealth of experience to the Synlait board.

“Bill’s governance skills and deep understanding of international business will add further depth to the board of Synlait Milk as the Company pursues its vision to be a trusted supplier of choice to some of the world’s best milk-based health and nutrition companies.” . . .

LIC handling ‘small cow’ issue well:

Having met with Livestock Improvement Corporation (LIC) in recent weeks, Federated Farmers is happy with the briefing it has received from LIC on the isolation of a gene responsible for small dairy cows.

“This recessive gene means calves are born a normal size but simply do not grow,” says Chris Lewis, Federated Farmers Waikato Dairy chairperson.

“The gene has always been present in New Zealand breeding sires, so what LIC has done in isolating the gene is a breakthrough. As is the fact Federated Farmers and LIC sat down together to discuss things openly and honestly. . .

Bioenergy conference highlights opportunities:

A one-day conference in Rotorua this Thursday (16 May), supported by Federated Farmers, will take land owners through the economics of bioenergy, which could become a big part of New Zealand’s energy future.

“The biofuels versus food issue is not relevant to New Zealand. We are looking at biofuels, plus food. This can be a win-win for farmers,” explains Anders Crofoot, Federated Farmers energy spokesperson.

“It is not about replacing sheep and cattle with biomass crops, but about growing these crops while also harnessing the organic waste of our sheep and cattle, or our wood harvest waste. . .

Young Men Line Up In Dairy Trainee Final:

The 12 finalists in the 2013 New Zealand Dairy Trainee of the Year competition will meet in Canterbury next week to take part in a study tour around the region.

Aged from 23 years to 28 years, the study tour is designed to increase the trainee’s enthusiasm and knowledge of the dairy industry and demonstrate what opportunities are available as they progress.

The 2013 New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards will announce winners of the New Zealand Sharemilker/Equity Farmer of the Year, New Zealand Farm Manager of the Year as well as the trainee contest in Wellington on May 24. More than $150,000 in prizes will be given away. . .

Triple Gold for Yealands Estate at The International Wine Challenge:

Yealands Estate Wines has been awarded three gold medals, amongst a field of more than 12,000 wines, at the 2013 International Wine Challenge.

The judges awarded gold to Yealands Estate Single Block Series R3 Pinot Noir 2011, Yealands Estate Single Vineyard Grüner Veltliner 2012 and Yealands Estate Single Block Series S1 Sauvignon Blanc 2012. The Yealands Estate Single Block Series S1 Sauvignon Blanc 2011 last year received the International Sauvignon Blanc Trophy. . .

A Fair Go for Tongan Vanilla Growers:

Queen Fine Foods, New Zealand’s largest distributor of vanilla products used widely in Kiwi homes, has entered into a partnership with the people of Tonga to reinvigorate their vanilla industry.

The Queen Fine Foods initiative works with growers to develop sustainable and organic farming practices. It teaches farmers not only how to grow high quality beans, but to cure their crop and add value. Growers who join the partnership receive a long term supply agreement with Queen, which guarantees certainty of income for years to come. . .

:)


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