Rural round-up

28/10/2021

Southland boosted by UK free trade, sets up NZ for EU talks – Blair Jackson:

An in-principle free trade agreement with the UK is good news for Southland and positions New Zealand for negotiations with the EU, a sheep and beef farmer says.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced an in-principle agreement with the UK on Thursday, which will entirely remove tariffs on most goods produced in New Zealand.

It is expected to boost exports by 40 per cent, and lift New Zealand’s gross domestic product by $970 million.

Sheep and beef export quota volumes will increase over time, with all tariffs eliminated after 15 years. . . 

Truffle business to produce double Southern Hemisphere’s current crop – Nadine Porter:

Canterbury will be home to the first large-scale producer of truffles south of the equator with 37,500 trees expected to produce double the current yield of the entire southern hemisphere.

In a secret four-year operation, the NZ Truffle Company has set up nurseries and greenhouses at a small farm near Rangiora run by the company’s two shareholders, Catherine and Matthew Dwan, before planting a 75-hectare truffle plantation near Darfield.

The entire crop, worth between $2500 and $3000 per kilogram, will be exported to lucrative Asian and European luxury food markets.

In a statement, the company said financial returns per kilogram were expected to be between seven and 86 times that of any other New Zealand crop. . . 

Couple touting picking strawberries as fun family outing – Jared Morgan:

From bulls to berries — they are polar opposites but Ben and Rebecca Trotter are hoping they attract.

For the past three years, the couple have farmed 135ha at the junction of State Highways 6 and 8A at Luggate 11km from Wanaka.

Their focus, until now, has been farming Friesian bulls, while working their day jobs — Mr Trotter specialising in grass seed as South Island manager for Agricom, Mrs Trotter as a lower South Island territory agribusiness manager for Genesis Energy.

Added to the mix are the couple’s two children, Florence (2) and Edward (8 months). . . 

Farming changes through generations on Lindisvale family property – Marjorie Cook:

The Trevathan family has been farming at Lindisvale, near Tarras, since 1914. Marjorie Cook meets fifth-generation Trevathan, Maggie (6 months) and chats with her dad, Jonny, and grandparents Beau and Ann about farming changes over five generations.

Eight years after Jonny Trevathan was sent home from a Masterchef competition for burning a pork chop, the irrepressible Tarras farmer is still confidently farming and cooking for his family.

He was relieved to quit Auckland and return to life on Lindisvale farm in the Ardgour Valley.

‘‘I just did that for s…s and giggles,’’ he confessed. . . 

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CWA supports quad bike changes – Stephanie Stanhope:

Change isn’t always easy, but sometimes it is necessary; especially when lives, livelihoods and communities are involved.

Most readers would be aware of the new requirements relating to quad bike measures that have kicked in as of the October 11.

There are new rules in place that will improve quad bike safety through the provision of more consumer information outlining warnings for operators.

The design of new quad bikes will also need to be improved from a handling perspective. . . 


Rural round-up

23/08/2021

Another battle about land is ahead – Mike Houlahan:

Back on August 12, 2021 BD (before Delta), when Parliament rose for what was meant to be an uneventful and restful recess week, MPs had just started the second reading debate on the Crown Pastoral Land Reform Bill.

Back on August 12, 2021 BD (before Delta), when Parliament rose for what was meant to be an uneventful and restful recess week, MPs had just started the second reading debate on the Crown Pastoral Land Reform Bill.

Quite when they will get back to considering the merits or otherwise of the Bill is anyone’s guess.

When that day comes though, it will be keenly watched – the discussion paper on the review attracted 320 submissions, and the 161 submissions the environment select committee waded through to reach this point included a form submission lodged by 1733 individuals. . . 

Plant nurseries rush to save seedlings on eve of lockdown – Sam Olley:

Lockdown has come at one of the worst possible times for nurseries, amid the late winter planting season for native plants and forestry.

Nurseries are allowed to carry out some maintenance but it is far from business as usual.

For Ngā Uri o Hau nursery in Mangawhai it was a scramble to save the trees on the eve of lockdown.

Six thousand native plants sat on pellets in a loading bay ready to go out to clients but they had no irrigation, and wouldn’t be going anywhere at alert level 4. . . 

While the Brits brace for Christmas without turkeys, NZ leads APEC initiative on food security – Point of Order:

Not enough turkeys for Christmas?

Calamity.

Not in this country (so far as we know), but in Britain, where the British Poultry Council is pressing the UK Government to deal with the culinary consequences of shortages of workers resulting from the UK’s departure from the European Union.

The British food industry faces huge disruptions that have forced leading restaurants – including Nando’s and KFC – to reduce their service or to close. . .

It’s calving time – Country LIfe:

It’s calving season and dairy farmers around the country are working long hours.

They’re not only doing the usual milking and maintenance but watching over their herds as they calve.

Country Life Producer Sally Round got up before the birds and put on her wet weather gear to meet Wairarapa dairy farmer Jody James and his team to find out what happens.

It’s pitch black and the temperature has plunged. . .

Value your time – Mark Guscott:

After a recent field day, Mark Guscott is asking the question: Do farmers value their time?

Do you value your time? In my experience there are heaps of farmers who don’t. I went to a field day to learn from a cocky who was doing a good job of wintering cattle. He fed them a lot of balage and hay and was asked, “how does that amount of feeding-out stack up financially?”.

He replied that it didn’t cost him anything as the grass grew for free and he owned his own baler! Well, the language in my mind was colourful and I straight away lost concentration. This was unfortunate on my part as he was doing a good job overall. I guess his rationale was that once the payments on the baler were finished then it didn’t owe him anything. Fair call, but what about the diesel for the tractor, the person driving that tractor or the maintenance on the baler?

The point is that what we do every day is important and worthwhile. We should value what we do. The cocky was doing a good job but he needed to account for the wage or drawings that he feeds his family with. There are some that would say that any profit made is payment, but when the coffers are empty at the end of the year, it wouldn’t be very encouraging to think ‘I’ve worked hard all year for nothing’. What we do to look after our land, our animals and our people is bloody important. While sometimes it might not feel like it, there are a lot of people out there who value what we do. . .

Rural areas need a Covid strategy, and fast – Stephanie Stanhope:

It’s fair to say that the people of regional, rural and remote NSW are on high alert as the COVID-19 pandemic presents new challenges yet again.

A state-wide lockdown has commenced and communities are grappling with what this means in terms of access to essential supplies and services, keeping businesses afloat and families’ food on the table, in already strained circumstances.

Access to healthcare in regional and rural NSW is already difficult, as the CWA of NSW has been advocating on for some time now.

Last year we surveyed our members and overwhelmingly heard about long wait times to see general practitioners, lack of nurses and health professionals, and ill-equipped hospitals servicing large areas of the regions. . .

 


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