Oyster farming secret cracked

September 9, 2013

Bluff Oyster Co says it’s cracked the secret to farming oysters for export:

A Bluff oyster company says it has cracked the secret to farming the Bluff oyster for export.

But the company, which is based in the old Ocean Beach meatworks in the port town, will not be ready to start production until it finds suitable waters to finish off the oysters.

New Zealand’s Bluff Oyster Co general manager Rodney Clark said they would then be ready to produce millions of oysters for the world market.

Mr Clark, who has been involved in the Southland fishing industry for 25 years, said he started pioneering the project a decade ago.

The hatchery and nursery were now “perfected” and ready to produce millions of oyster spat and adult-sized oysters for export, he said. . .

This is good news for oyster lovers all over the world.

I’m not among them but accept the verdict of oyster lovers that the Bluff ones are the best.

“This has the potential, with the right support in the southern region, to produce hundreds of new jobs but it will need support from councils and local government,” he said.

Targeting the export market would avoid flooding the New Zealand market and help to protect the existing wild Bluff oyster industry, Mr Clark said.

The oysters would be grown in the hatchery before moving into Bluff Harbour. But the harbour is not “certified waters” so the oysters would need to be moved to other certified waters approved for the sale of shellfish for export.

New Zealand’s Bluff Oyster Co is working with Southern Clams, which is based in Dunedin.

Southern Clams operations manager Dave Redshaw said he was in the process of applying for a resource consent to finish the Bluff oysters in Otago Harbour.

The farmed Bluff oysters would be moved to the harbour for two weeks to cleanse before meeting export standard, he said.

The Otago Regional Council had rejected two applications because of insufficient information, but the company expected to present its third application next month, he said. . .

The ODT is running a Stand Up Otago campaign which is supported by the ORC and Dunedin City Council.

Having a how-can-we-help attitude rather than a you-have-to-do-this one from councils plays an important part in business development.

I’m not suggesting they should break any rules, just that they need to ensure the rules they have are necessary and that applicants are helped to comply with them.

The south needs all the jobs it can get and councils must ensure they’re not putting unnecessary hurdles in the way of businesses which could crate them.


Rural round-up

April 20, 2013

World record for Canterbury merino farmer – Tim Cronshaw:

Canterbury merino farmer Anna Emmerson has beaten the Australians at their own game by winning the Loro Piana Challenge Cup in Hong Kong with a world record bale of the finest merino wool.

She broke her own record of 10.9 microns set in 2010 with an ultra-fine bale in the competition held in Paris.

In the past, winning bales have made around $200,000, paid by the family owned clothing and fabric maker Loro Piana, led by Italian brothers Pier Luigi Loro Piana and Sergio Loro Piana.

The business does not disclose the amount paid other than that a premium was offered above its market value if it breaks a record. . .

First Australian for Kellogg leaders’ programme:

Lincoln University’s Kellogg Rural Leaders Programme has extended its welcome, with the course accepting its first Australian participant this year.

 The programme has welcomed Mary Johnson as the first Australian to join the course and also the youngest applicant in its 34-year history.

“I found out about the programme through my line of work at Cattle Council Australia and then through the Australian Beef Industry Foundation,” says Johnson.
“I did some of my own research and found that the Kellogg programme is all over the world, so I jumped at the opportunity.” . .

Partnership offers promise of profit – Tim Cronshaw:

Meat companies cannot afford to suffer more financial losses after losing $200 million last season, and farmers must commit stock to one company to ensure a healthy red- meat industry, says Lincoln University agribusiness professor Keith Woodford.

He told 600 farmers at a Christchurch meeting of the new Meat Industry Excellence (MIE) group on Wednesday that they had to work in partnership with the rest of the industry, because the combative approach was not working.

A sustainable industry, in which everyone made money, was the end game, he said. This would be challenging and require some restructuring. . .

Australians push for Korean FTA:

AUSTRALIAN BEEF farmers are pushing the Gillard Government to restart free trade agreement talks with South Korea. Industry leaders visited Seoul this month seeking to resume talks with the South Koreans.

The National Farmers Union says Australian beef producers stand to miss out on A$1.4 billion in exports to Korea unless a FTA is in place soon. It says the threat to other exports like wheat (A$350 million) and dairy (A$100 million) is also high.

FTA talks between Australia and South Korea stalled after the Australian cabinet banned even starting talks which require settling any type of investor-state dispute (allowing companies unhappy with their treatment in another country to seek arbitration in an agreed third jurisdiction). . .

Farmer protests fail to sway government

Protest meetings in Victoria and South Australia, further planned demonstrations and a direct meeting have all left Federal Agriculture Minister Joe Ludwig unmoved.

Farmer Power representatives met with Minister Ludwig last month at a meeting hosted by the Victorian Farmers Federation. The United Dairy Farmers of Victoria also attended.

The group asked for cash assistance to help farmers address cash flow problems. . .

Southern Clams Plans to Diversify with Bluff Oysters in Otago Harbour:

Within twelve months, Dunedin restaurants, could be serving live oysters on the shell straight from Otago Harbour. The plan is the brainchild of Southern Clams who have identified a unique opportunity to diversify their shellfish operations by utilising the certified growing waters of Otago Harbour.

In a consent application to the Otago Regional Council, tabled today, Southern Clams is proposing to take two year old oysters, which have been farmed by New Zealand’s Bluff Oyster Company (NZBO) in Bluff Harbour, and re-lay them in Otago Harbour for up to four weeks, until they meet statutory regulations for commercial harvest. . .


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