Rural round-up

26/07/2019

Rural areas face risk form forestry – Steve Carle:

The fabric of our local rural communities could be severely impacted by conversion of sheep and beef farming to forestry if Government doesn’t change its combination of policies on the Emissions Trading Scheme and its stance on the upcoming Zero Carbon Bill. Submissions for this Bill closed on July 16.

In the Tararua District it is likely sheep and beef farms will be largely replaced by carbon farming and our farm service industries will evaporate.

New Zealand forestry is dominated by overseas investors who will likely dominate carbon farming.

“Once an investor has optimised all the benefits from the first cycle of carbon-sink, the land then becomes a carbon and financial liability,” says Keith Woodford, primary consultant at Agrifood Systems. . . 

DairyNZ CEO: make the methane target achievable:

Today, DairyNZ chief executive Dr Tim Mackle appeared before Parliament’s Environment Select Committee to send a clear message to politicians – an unachievable 47 percent methane reduction target would be setting farmers up to fail.

“The New Zealand dairy sector is committed to playing our part in the transition to a low-emissions economy, alongside the rest of the country,” said Dr Mackle.

“We are acutely aware of the importance of looking after the environment and maintaining sustainable and competitive businesses too.

“We know there are costs for our farmers but there are also costs for global inaction. That’s why we are seeking pragmatic and prudent policies that enable action and support our farmers to play their part on climate change. . . 

Townie now award-winning farmer – Annette Scott:

A self-confessed townie who married a farmer, Karen Williams never quite envisaged the path her career would take. She talked to Annette Scott about her journey to top level industry leadership.

The first woman to lead the Federated Farmers’ arable section is a self-confessed townie who married into farming.

“When I give talks at meetings I often start with my I’m a townie confession. Rural provincial townie, not a city slicker,” arable section chairwoman Karen Williams says.

“My journey to industry leadership has been largely driven by my background in resource management.”

Williams and her husband Mick farm arable, sheep and beef in Wairarapa. . . 

Truffle fascination an exciting but risky hobby for Paengaroa couple– Stuart Whitaker:

Truffles are among the most valuable and sought-after of culinary delights.

For a Paengaroa couple, the air of mystery that surrounds the rare fungi has become a healthy obsession that is now a huge influence on their lives.

Colin and Maureen Binns began creating their truffiere – a grove of trees where truffles are cultivated – in 2008. In 2015 they harvested their first Black Périgord truffles.

Last year the truffiere produced around 3kg of truffles during the two-month season, which starts in June. This season, with the help of truffle dog Jed who sniffs them out, they have unearthed around 20kg. . . 

 

Australian millet broom factory tries to resist sweeping changes in consumer culture – Hannah Laxton andKoonce and Cara Jeffery:

As an industry dies around them, two men are refusing to be brushed aside by the passage of time.

On a typical day, Geoff Wortes and Rob Richards make more than 50 brooms by hand at their factory on the edge of the Snowy Mountains.

The brooms are made using millet; the grass fibres appear stiff and uncooperative, however experienced hands mould them with ease.

More than a dozen people worked at the Tumut Broom Factory during the 1970s — now only two remain. . .

Rural life in the past was a battle for survival – Marian L. Tupy:

In my last two pieces for CapX, I sketched out the miserable existence of our ancestors in the pre-industrial era. My focus was on life in the city, a task made easier by the fact that urban folk, thanks to higher literacy rates, have left us more detailed accounts of their lives.

This week I want to look at rural life, for that is where most people lived. At least theoretically, country folk could have enjoyed a better standard of living due to their “access to abundant commons – land, water, forests, livestock and robust systems of sharing and reciprocity,” which the anthropologist Jason Hickel praised in a recent article in The Guardian. In fact, the life of a peasant was, in some important aspects, worse than that of a city dweller.

Before industrialisation, European society was bifurcated between a small minority of the very rich and the vast majority of the very poor. Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban, a military engineer during the reign of Louis XIV, estimated that the French population consisted of 10 per cent rich, 50 per cent very poor (fort malaise), 30 per cent near beggars and 10 per cent beggars. Likewise, Francesco Guicciardini, an Italian historian and friend of Niccolò Machiavelli, wrote that “except for a few Grandees of the Kingdom [of Spain] who live with great sumptuousness, one gathers that the others live in great poverty”. . . 

 


Rural round-up

04/07/2017

Rare birds flourish in Canterbury cows’ paddocks – Conan Young:

A colony of 300 critically endangered birds has found an unlikely place to nest – in the middle of a paddock full of dairy cows.

The discovery was made late last year – black billed gulls building their nests on the Canterbury farm and then successfully raising their chicks, oblivious to the cows grazing nearby and the odd shower from a pivot irrigator.

Ornithologists were amazed to see the birds nesting in an area they had not been seen in for three years.

Last year’s unusual discovery was revealed on Thursday at a seminar organised by Braid – a group dedicated to saving the South Island’s braided rivers and the creatures that live there. . .

Common pesticides can harm bees, but the jury is still out on a global ban – Phil Lester:

Some of the world’s most widely used pesticides can be harmful to bees, according to the first large-scale studies aimed at measuring the impact of compounds called neonicotinoids on bees’ health. But the effects vary widely between different compounds and different countries, suggesting that more regional research will be needed to clarify the exact scale of the problem.

Neonicotinoids, which are typically coated onto seeds before planting rather than being sprayed onto crop plants, were developed with the aim of harming only those animals that eat the plants. But they are also found in the pollen and nectar of treated plants, potentially affecting beneficial organisms like bees. . . 

South Devon cattle ticket to world – Sally Rae:

South Devon cattle have taken Allanton farmer Brian Thomson all over the world.

And what he has discovered is that the breed, which originates from the southwest of England, adapts to whatever environment it is farmed in.

Mr Thomson recently stepped down as the president of the World South Devon Association after a three-year term.

He has been to every triennial world conference since 2005, seeing the breed in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, the United States and South Africa. . . 

McClay announces FTA negotiations with Pacific Alliance:

Trade Minister Todd McClay has announced the launch of free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations with Mexico, Chile, Colombia and Peru and says better market access and lower tariffs will be of real value to New Zealand exporters.

“This is a big win in the fight for better access for New Zealanders to important overseas markets. We’ve worked hard for trade talks with the Pacific Alliance over the last two years and today’s announcement will be welcome news for our exporters,” Mr McClay says. . . 

Fonterra Global Foodservice Takes Supreme ExportNZ Award:

Fonterra Global Foodservice has taken out the supreme award for the 2017 Air New Zealand Cargo ExportNZ Awards for Auckland and Waikato regions.

Judges were impressed with the $1.6 billion foodservice business (which is 80% exports) and growing at around 20% per annum, returning strong margins and true added value to the dairy industry and New Zealand. In tonight’s awards, it also won the Westpac Exporter of the Year (export revenue over $25 million) category. . . 

Supreme Award for Fonterra at 2017 ExportNZ Awards:

Winning the Supreme Award at the 2017 ExportNZ Awards for Auckland and Waikato is recognition the Co-operative’s product innovation is meeting changing customer expectations, says Fonterra Chairman John Wilson.

At an event in Auckland last night, ExportNZ Auckland and Waikato (divisions of the Employers and Manufacturers Association) gave their top award to Fonterra Foodservice after the Co-op earlier won the Westpac Exporter of the Year (total sales over $25 million) category. There were 25 finalists across seven categories of the awards, sponsored by Air New Zealand Cargo. . . 

Bayer Auckland/Northern Young Viticulturist of the Year 2017 announced:

Congratulations to Tim Adams from Obsidian who became the Bayer Auckland/Northern Young Viticulturist of the Year for the second year in a row on Friday 30 June at Goldie Estate.

Congratulations also goes to Jake Dromgool from The Landing in Kerikeri who came second and to Nick Pett from Cable Bay who came third.

The Auckland/Northern region was added to the Young Viticulturist of the Year competition last year and now in its second year the competition has grown already with seven contestants taking part.  . . 


South Devon/Friesian X sirloin NZ’s best

18/05/2011

A South Devon/Friesian X sirloin steak from Phil Hoskin in Pahiatua was judged New Zealand’s tenderest and tastiest in the 2011 Beef + Lamb New Zealand Steak of Origin competition.

Twenty finalists, carved down from nearly 400, were tasted by a panel of judges at the grand final today during the Beef Expo in Feilding.

The judging panel comprised Commonwealth Gold Medallist Alison Shanks, All Black Legend Richard Loe, food writer and television personality Julie Biuso, radio host Jamie Mackay and top chef, Graham Hawkes.

Each steak was assessed on aroma, juiciness, tenderness, texture and taste.

Head judge and chef, Graham Hawkes said the competition just keeps growing and the entries just keep getting better.

“The quality of New Zealand beef is simply the best and the entries this year were no exception,” says Hawkes.

The Grand Champion was awarded the prestigious Beef + Lamb New Zealand Steak of Origin Trophy, the original Beef Carcass shield and $5000.

The supreme brand award went to Bowmont Wholesale Meats in Invercargill with their Hereford Prime entry.

The Steak of Origin contest has been run for more than eight years on behalf of Beef + Lamb NZ .

 The competition process involves an initial assessment of the sirloin steak at Carne Technologies in Cambridge. Each steak is aged for three weeks before being tested for tenderness, pH and % cooking loss. The most tender steaks make the semi-final and are cooked and tasted by a panel of judges in Christchurch. The finalists (four from each of the five classes) are tasted at the Beef Expo in Feilding by top chefs and celebrities to find the most tasty and tender steak in the country.

The full results of the final:

Class 1: Best of Breed – European
1st: Rob & Mary Ann Burrows, Culverden (Charolais), processed at Ashburton Meat Processors
2nd: Charlie Stephens, Christchurch (Piedmontese) processed at Ashburton Meat Processors/Ellesmere Butchery
3rd: Cornwall Park, Auckland (Simmental), processed at Auckland Meat Processors/Wilson Hellaby
4th: TD & BR O’Shea, Whangarei (Limousin), processed at Auckland Meat Processors/Wilson Hellaby

Class 2: Best of Breed – British
1st: DC & LJ Redmond, Rakaia (Angus) processed at Ashburton Meat Processors
2nd: Robin & Jacqueline Blackwell, Inglewood (Angus) processed at Taranaki Abattoir
3rd: Tim & Kelly Brittain, Otorohanga (Angus), processed at Auckland Meat Processors/Wilson Hellaby
4th: Tim & Kelly Brittain, Otorohanga (Angus), processed at Auckland Meat Processors/Wilson Hellaby

Class 3: Best of Breed – Crossbreed & Other
1st: Phillip Hoskin, Pahiatua (South Devon/Friesian X) processed at Silver Fern Farms, Hastings
2nd: Nigel Foster, Kaitaia (Angus X) processed at Silver Fern Farms, Dargaville
3rd: Kate & Paula Jordan, Blenheim (Charolais/Jersey X) processed at CMP Kokiri
4th: Julia & Stewart Eden, Gore (Dexter/Friesian X) processed at Alliance Mataura

Class 4: Best of Brand – Retail
1st: Bowmont Wholesale Meats, Invercargill (Hereford Prime)
2nd: Foodstuffs, North Island (AngusPure)
3rd: Glanworth Partnership, Pahiatua (AngusPure)
4th: Chef’s Choice, Wanganui (AngusPure)

Class 5: Best of Brand –Wholesaler and Foodservice providers
1st: Angus Meats, Christchurch (Angus Reserve)
2nd: Progressive Enterprises, Auckland (Countdown Finest Angus)
3rd: Land Meat NZ Ltd, Wanganui (AngusPure)
4th: Neat Meat, Auckland (AngusPure)

On a related matter, rivtettingKate Taylor has been at the Beef Expo and is all beefed out.


%d bloggers like this: