Rural round-up

June 28, 2016

Sir William Gallagher Named Exporters Champion & Gallagher Named Exporter of the Year:

Gallagher is continuing to gain recognition for its commitment to international markets, picking up two prestigious awards at the 2016 Air New Zealand Cargo ExportNZ Awards tonight.

In recognition of his vision, determination and success, Gallagher Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Sir William Gallagher, was named Exporters Champion for exemplary services to export, and the Gallagher business was named Exporter of the Year (total sales over $25 million).

Recognised as one of New Zealand’s most astute businessmen, Sir William has grown Gallagher into one of the largest and most successful private companies in New Zealand, employing almost 800 people domestically, another 400 globally and with annual revenues of more than $200 million. . . 

Rabobank Global Beef Quarterly Q2 2016: Volatility Challenges Beef Markets:

The Rabobank global beef index ticked up in Q1 2016 after declining for much of 2015. However it shows signs of dropping again as softening prices in the US and Canada battle strengthening prices in Australia and Brazil, according to the Rabobank Global Beef Quarterly Q2 2016.

“Volatility is a key theme across most markets at the moment“, says Angus Gidley-Baird, Senior Animal Protein Analyst at Rabobank. “A range of factors are creating a degree of uncertainty, including the economy and exchange rates influencing Brazil, seasonal conditions impacting Australia, the economy impacting China, and market volatility impacting the US”. . . 

New cuts help keep venison on menus:

Venison exporters and Deer Industry NZ (DINZ) are promoting new cuts to chefs to increase returns from the whole deer carcass and to help keep venison on restaurant menus.

Venison production to April this year was down 20% on the same period last year, driven by herd rebuilding, with the hind kill down 25%. On 13 June the average stag venison schedule stood at $7.55 a kilogram, versus $6.67 a year before, an increase of 13%, despite a steady firming of the Kiwi against the US dollar and Euro in recent months. . . 

Bega first Aussie dairy producer to downgrade new season milk price forecast – Fiona Rotherham

(BusinessDesk) – Australian-listed dairy company Bega Cheese has released an opening farmgate milk price for the 2016/2017 season of A$5 per kilogram of milk solids, claiming analysts are not expecting an improvement in dairy commodity returns until the first half of next year.

Fonterra Cooperative Group and Australia’s biggest dairy processor Murray Goulburn are yet to announce their opening forecast for the new season in Australia though last month Fonterra set an early price of $4.25 for New Zealand suppliers. That was up 35 cents on the forecast milk price for the 2015/2016 season. Murray Goulburn said it would release its opening forecast after a board meeting at the end of this month. . . 

War on Weeds Dirty Dozen revealed:

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry has announced this year’s Dirty Dozen plants as part of the ongoing War on Weeds.

“This year we are going to have a baker’s dozen of weeds – with enemy number one the wilding conifer,” Ms Barry says.

“Wildings now cover approximately 1.8 million hectares of land and are advancing at around 5 per cent a year. They transform entire landscapes, ruin native ecosystems and take over productive land indiscriminately.

“Budget 2016 committed an extra $16 million over the next four years to control their spread and by working with regional councils, landowners and community groups we believe we can stem their advance.” . . 

Stricter rules for quarantine facilities:

Stricter new rules for approved quarantine facilities will reduce the chance of unwanted pests or diseases arriving in New Zealand from imported goods, says the Ministry for Primary Industries.

MPI released new rules earlier this month for New Zealand-based “transitional facilities”, which are used by importers to hold goods before they are checked for contaminants such as hitchhiking bugs or reptiles.

“The changes will see a major biosecurity shake-up for these facilities, particularly in the areas of training and auditing requirements,” says Paul Hallett, MPI Manager, Biosecurity and Environment. . . 

Tegal crows over year of plump sales:

Chicken processor Tegel’s strong local sales and record export earnings have led it to turn in a better full-year profit than forecast in its first year as a listed company.

The company, which listed on the New Zealand and Australian exchanges last month, reported a net profit of $11.3 million for the 12 months to late April.

That compares with a profit of $8.7m the year before and a forecast of $10m when it listed last month. . . 


6 ideas to re-connect a generation

June 30, 2013

Being unemployed at any age is undesirable but youth unemployment is even more of a problem.

Having a job and learning the generic skills that come with doing it properly even with an unskilled job help make young people more employable.

Going from school on to a benefit rather than into further education, training or a job, make young people less employable and the longer they’re not working the more difficult it is for them to get,a nd keep, a job.

Kevin Roberts observes that young people without jobs are at risk of becoming disconnected from society and he offers six ideas to help re-connect them:

  • Partner more schools with local businesses, trade academies, and universities
  • Run career days for every age from 11 up
  • Introduce entrepreneurial skills as a subject in primary schools
  • Create start-up hubs that provide free internet access and basic business amenities for young graduates starting out
  • Cities should run competitions that challenge youth to find solutions to civic problems
  • Sing together. Singing keeps your spirits up, elevates parts of you that don’t often get to rise up. And you could be a YouTube phenomenon.

Having a job doesn’t necessarily mean working for someone else.

The Fieldays provided an opportunity for a young entrepreneur to show age isn’t a barrier to innovation:

. . . 12-year-old Patrick Roskram of Matamata, made an enthusiastic pitch to the Innovation Den panel about his invention; the fencing tool Gudgeon Pro 4in1. Patrick’s passionate speech was recognised by Dr Ray Thompson, Chair of the Angel’s Association NZ, who awarded the $1000 Best Pitch Award to the young finalist saying it was a stand-out presentation. Patrick also won a marketing pack from Vodafone’s Darren Hopper who offered time with their creative agency in Auckland. However, the icing on the cake for the young inventor was a personal invitation from Sir William Gallagher for the 12-year-old to have an internship at Gallagher’s Research and Development department during his school holidays.

Sir William Gallagher joined a surprised Patrick on stage as he finished his presentation. Sir William congratulated Patrick on his pitch, giving him a triple A for enthusiasm.

“You’ve certainly got a solution for the New Zealand market and I can see an opportunity for it. There’s some homework to do but I’m certain you can come up with a product that can go into shops.”

Patrick later said it was all “pretty awesome” and it had always been a dream of his to speak to Sir William and that he had lots of other ideas up his sleeve. . . .

It would be a safe bet that someone with this sort of initiative and ability at that age won’t be troubled by unemployment.


Gallagher gains lifetime achievement award

September 29, 2011

Bill (now Sir William) Gallagher made his first electric fence in 1937.

How he did it and the development of his business makes inspirational reading.

He has made a significant contribution to farming, business and New Zealand in general. The  New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Trust has recognised his contribution to the dairy sector, in particular by presenting him with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

Trust chair Barbara Kuriger says SWilliam is ir known as one of New Zealand’s most astute businessmen and chairs the successful Hamilton exporter of animal management, fencing and security systems, Gallagher Group.

“We selected Sir William for this award as he has taken a proud and iconic New Zealand company and succeeded internationally. He is also viewed by the trustees as an outstanding New Zealander and a fine example to current and prospective business people.

“His company’s contribution to New Zealand farming systems has been huge.”

. . . In presenting the award, Mrs Kuriger said: “Sir William is a natural leader, whose communication skills and business influence is nationally and internationally recognised. He has created a work environment that encourages personal empowerment and independent thinking.

“A true entrepreneur, he has a sense of urgency and controlled risk taking, which is supported and managed by the positive team he works with.”

She said Sir William’s major skill was his ability to communicate across language and social barriers with an emphasis on ethics and integrity in his professional and personal dealings.

“Sir William has a strong and active commitment to the environment he lives and works in – he is a major sponsor of the Rescue Helicopter, Waikato Stadium, Mounted Police, Gallagher Family Hospice, Gallagher Hockey Centre and the establishment of the Performing Arts centre at Waikato University.”

There probably isn’t a farm in New Zealand which doesn’t use electric fences and Galaher’s electric fencing has also been one of New Zealand’s export success stories.

NZDIAT’s lifetime award is well deserved recognition of not only what Sir William has done but the way he has done it.


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