Rural round-up

December 1, 2014

Mining can help revive struggling rural economies:

• Rural regions and their manufacturing-based economies are shrinking
• Decline at odds with high mineral endowment in rural areas
• RMA and lack of incentives are major hurdles to resource development

The minerals sector can help revive New Zealand’s struggling rural economies, but only if the government reduces the complexity of the Resource Management Act and creates financial incentives for local government.

This is a key finding of Poverty of Wealth: Why Minerals Need to be Part of the Rural Economy, the latest report produced by public policy think tank, The New Zealand Initiative. . .

Fonterra farm fund seen as stepping stone – Andrea Fox:

Dairy farmers interested in buying land through an equity partnership trust being proposed by Fonterra would need to show they would be profitable enough to one day buy back the farm, says the co-operative’s shareholder council.

Fonterra is planning a new fund to invest in farms and has begun talks with potential investors.

The trust would be a partner that would invest in farming operations through a minority stake.

Council chairman Ian Brown said the trust could be particularly helpful to young farmers wanting to buy their first farm. Established farmers wanting to buy the next-door property and those involved in equity farming partnerships could also find it useful, he said.

Whatever the type of farming operation, it would have to be profitable, and profitable enough, to have the ability to buy the trust out at some point, Brown said. . .

Maniototo farm impresses Peren Cup judges -Sally Rae:

When the judges of the Sir Geoffrey Peren Cup competition visited the Lindsay family’s farm in the Maniototo, they were impressed with what they saw.

Creekside Farms Ltd is farmed by Adam Lindsay, his partner Jules Blanchard, and his mother Karen Lindsay.

The family was one of four entrants in this year’s competition, which is held annually in the region that is hosting Perendale New Zealand’s national conference.

A field day was held last week at Creekside Farms, between Kyeburn and Ranfurly, where an impressive farming operation, including extensive development, was outlined. . .

Hailstorm misses strawberries – Sally Brooker:

Waimate’s main strawberry fields escaped last week’s hailstorm and are looking good for the season.

Donald Butler, who, with wife Jackie, owns Butler’s Berry Farm and Cafe, said they were lucky the hail that bombarded the east coast last Wednesday skirted around their property alongside State Highway 1 at Hook, just north of Waimate.

”It was close, but it’s all good.”

The fruit was ”all coming on quite nicely”, with strawberries already on sale. Those he took to the Otago Farmers’ Market in Dunedin on Saturday sold quickly and customers told him they were ”tasting good”. . .

One year anniversary of trade deal marked:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy and Trade Minister Tim Groser have welcomed the one year anniversary today of the Economic Cooperation Agreement between New Zealand and the Separate Customs Territory of Taiwan, Penghu, Kinmen and Matsu on Economic Cooperation (ANZTEC).

“Since then exports to  have increased over 20 percent compared with the same period the previous year, a $150 million increase,” says Mr Groser.

“Over 69 percent of New Zealand’s exports to Chinese Taipei are now tariff free, representing savings of around $78.4 million to date.”

The agreement will see complete removal of tariffs on New Zealand’s current exports to Chinese Taipei, with 99 percent eliminated in four years.  . .

Timber exports scheme cuts greenhouse gases:

Associate Minister for Primary Industries Jo Goodhew has welcomed the implementation of a programme that allows timber products to be exported to Australia without chemical treatment.

“After a successful trial last summer, the Secure Pathway Programme has been opened up to industry in a bid to reduce the use of methyl bromide during the flight season of the burnt pine longhorn beetle,” Mrs Goodhew says.

“All exporters now have a new option for treating products such as sawn timber, timber mouldings, panel products and veneer sheets.

“The alternative process creates a physical barrier between the wood product and this wood boring beetle, preventing infestation and reducing the usage of methyl bromide.” . .


Rural round-up

May 7, 2014

Farmers ‘need to meet minimum standards’:

Farm employment issues will be high on the agenda at Dairy New Zealand’s farmers forum in Waikato on Wednesday and Thursday.

Dairy NZ is responding to farmers’ requests to provide some practical guidance following a recent survey by labour inspectors found most of the farms checked were breaking employment rules. Most of the breaches related to record-keeping.

The organisation, along with Federated Farmers, is seeking changes to the minimum wage order so farmers can average out their employee’s pay over a fortnight rather than a week. . .

Rural lending growth may slow after dairy-fuelled expansion – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand’s rural lending, which more than doubled to an all-time high of $50.6 billion in the past decade on dairy farm expansion, may slow as farmers use record milk payouts to reduce debt, spurred on by rising interest rates.

In the past 10 years to June 30, 2013, agricultural debt has risen mostly due to the dairy sector where lending has almost tripled to $32.4 billion. The surge in lending to the dairy industry far exceeds the $1.4 billion debt owed by sheep farmers and $1.2 billion accrued by beef cattle farmers, according to Reserve Bank figures.

Dairy sector lending has soared as farmers have invested in converting land to dairy farming to take advantage of high milk prices and the associated strong growth in farm land prices, the central bank said in its last Financial Stability report in November. Indebted dairy farmers will be weighing up using high dairy payouts to pay down debt or increase farm investment in anticipation of a positive outlook, it said. Since then, the bank has begun to raise interest rates, hiking the benchmark twice in as many months, and milk prices have weakened in response to increased production. . .

Passionate about the Perendale – Sally Rae:

Ask Duncan Smith why he has stuck with the Perendale breed and the answer is succinct.

”They are just so tough and they just don’t die,” Mr Smith, who farms Islay Downs, on the Pigroot, said.

Mr Smith and his wife Claire are among the four entrants in the Sir Geoffrey Peren Cup competition, judged on farm last month and held in conjunction with Perendale New Zealand’s national conference in Otago this week.

The winner will be announced during the conference. It was Mr Smith’s late father, Ross, who took up the Perendale breed in the late 1970s. He was a ”very staunch Perendale man”. . .

Breed event in Otago – Sally Rae:

More than 60 registrations from throughout New Zealand have been received for Perendale New Zealand’s national conference in Otago this week.

Planning for the annual event, which alternates between the North and South islands, began nearly a year ago. The conference begins on Thursday with registrations and a dinner.

On Friday, there is a bus tour to South Otago, visiting the Mitchell family’s Hillcrest stud at Clinton, and the Gardner family’s stud near Balclutha. There will also be a visit to AgResearch’s Invermay research centre, and to the Elders woolstore to view a wool competition. . . .

 

NAIT helping graziers keep up to date:

Farmers grazing stock this season can keep track of their animals by ensuring their NAIT records are up to date.

“It’s important to record all off-farm movements of stock to grazing blocks and confirm with NAIT when the animals arrive back on your property,” said Dr Stu Hutchings, OSPRI New Zealand Group Manager, Programme Design and Farm Operations.

“NAIT tags provide a unique identification number for each animal, which can help farmers verify that the same animals they sent for grazing are the ones they are getting back.” . .  .

Small-scale pest control still helps:

A study of rat poisoning in small forest blocks has shown that pest control on a small-scale can still provide a huge boost to native bird populations.

The six year study was carried out by Massey University researchers who analysed the effects of rat control in 19 blocks near Bennydale in the King Country.

It showed that small-scale control increased the number of North Island robins by 50 percent on average each year and also helped other species favoured by rats . . .

Federated Farmers initiative makes employing easy:

Federated Farmers has developed a New Employers Pack to help first time employers meet their employment obligations and develop better working relationships on farm.

“We want all employers to be able to put their best foot forward and this pack allows them to do that,” says Katie Milne, Federated Farmers Employment Spokesperson.

“The New Employers Pack is in response to an overwhelming demand for it from our members. In a member survey 97 percent wanted an employment pack produced. So Federated Farmers has created one, which helps farmers get it right from the very start, and that ticks all the boxes.

“As a farmer myself, I know farmers would prefer to know they are doing it right and understand what is required of them. This pack is designed for all farm types so I know all farmers will jump at this innovative employment pack. . . .

Rural Equities lifts stake in Tandou to 21% after rights issue:

Rural Equities, the farming group controlled by the Cushing family, has lifted its stake in Tandou after taking up its entitlement in the ASX-listed agribusiness’s three-for-eight rights offer.

Entities associated with Rural Equities now hold 21 percent, up from the 17.7 percent owned in August. Tandou’s offer at 47 Australian cents a share closed on April 28. Shareholders subscribed for about A$13.5 million of the A$25.2 million sought. Underwriter Petra Capital made up the shortfall of about A$11.7 million, placing the stock with institutions and professional investors.

Tandou shares last traded at 46.5 Australian cents on the ASX and have gained about 12 percent in the past year. They are rated a ‘strong buy’ based on two analysts polled by Reuters. . . .

Zabeel Mares Highlight NZB Broodmare Sale:

A prime opportunity for new players to enter the breeding game and for existing breeders to expand their portfolio is presented by New Zealand Bloodstock’s National Broodmare Sale, next week (13 May) at Karaka.

There are 209 broodmares catalogued for sale by leading damsires from New Zealand, Australia and further afield, in foal to proven and exciting young sires.

One of the highlights of the Sale will be the 12 broodmare entries by legendary sire Zabeel. The recently retired Cambridge Stud stallion is the damsire of 24 individual Group 1 winners including Dundeel (High Chaparral), Atlantic Jewel (Fastnet Rock),Silent Achiever (O’Reilly), Go Indy Go(Bernardini) and O’Marilyn (O’Reilly) this season. . . .


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