Tuesday’s answers

16/06/2009

Monday’s questions were:

1. What did Simon & Garfunkel call themselves when they recorded their first top 50 hit, Hey Schoolgirl, in 1957?

2. Who said:  Too often the desire for peace has been expressed by women while the stewardship of the mechanisms which are used to attempt to secure peace in the short and medium term are dominated by male decision-making structures and informal arrangements. This must change.

3.  Who wrote Chance Is A Fine Thing?

4. Which city would you be in if you were standing in the Plaza de Mayo and looking at the Casa Rosada?

5. Which is New Zealand’s deepest lake?

Paul Tremewan gets an electronic bunch of flowers for a perfect score  – the second week in a row someone’s got the lot.

Swinestein gets a point for one right and a bonus for additional information.

Gravedodger gets two points for correct answers and a bonus for making me smile with the response to question 2.

Ed gets two correct and also gets a bonus for more information.

PDM – if you follow the link below you’ll find more about Lake Hauroko which is in Western Southland and it’s 463 metres deep.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break. Read the rest of this entry »


BOTW at the concert

15/06/2009

Paul Henry and Peter Williams were luke warm on the Simon & Garfunkel concert when discussing it on Breakfast this morning.

I can understand why because while we enjoyed it, Art Garfunkel and Paul Simon are both 67. Their voices aren’t quite what they were 30 years ago and would be more suited to a smaller, more intimate venue. But that of course would mean fewer people and therefore either much more expensive tickets or much less money made.

Note to the organisers: playing Frank Sinartra as we came in wasn’t the best way to warm up an audience for Simon & Garfunkel. Given the programme talked about the influence the Everly Brothers had on S&G, music from them and their contemporaries would have been more appropriate – and enjoyable.

That said, Simon & Garfunkel sang all the old favourites we wanted to hear, the musicians were fantastic and even though they’re not the young men we remembered, they’ve still got a touch of magic.

The Stuff review is here.

The Dom Post review is here.

Lane Nichols blogs on the concert here.

The Herald review is here:

Bridge Over Troubled Water was always going to be A Moment. But as Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel traded verses on pop’s greatest consoling anthem towards the end of this first show of their Auckland two-nighter, it became Really Quite Something Else. The sound system – possibly overcome by its own electronic lump in the throat – gave out, leaving just the stage-sound and a slighty confused looking Simon and Garfunkel.

The crowd took over. And just as it built to its final crescendo, the sound came back up. Big finish. Aaah. Sigh.

“That was the nicest thing an audience has ever done for us” remarked Garfunkel.

And Bits On The Side  took a video of  Bridge Over Troubled Water when the sound system went and the audience took over (pity that the bloke close to the recorder had more enthusiasm than tune).


Monday’s Quiz

15/06/2009

1. What did Simon & Garfunkel call themselves when they recorded their first top 50 hit, Hey Schoolgirl, in 1957?

2. Who said:  Too often the desire for peace has been expressed by women while the stewardship of the mechanisms which are used to attempt to secure peace in the short and medium term are dominated by male decision-making structures and informal arrangements. This must change.

3.  Who wrote Chance Is A Fine Thing?

4. Which city would you be in if you were standing in the Plaza de Mayo and looking at the Casa Rosada?

5. Which is New Zealand’s deepest lake?


Bridge Over Troubled Water – Elvis Presley & others

14/06/2009

No one does it quite like SImon and Garfunkel but PauL left a comment on last Sunday’s post of Bridge Over Troubled Water pointing me to the Eva Cassidy  version.

That sent me in search of others and I found there’s about 2,260 of them on YouTube among which are:

Aretha Franklin

Charlotte Church

Nana Mouskouri

Il Divo

And then there’s Elvis Presley. 

I was a wee bit young to be a fan of Elvis Presley but this makes me wish I’d been born a wee bit sooner 🙂


Simon & Garfunkel in concert

14/06/2009

The faces are a bit older, the voices not so strong, but the songs are just as good as they used to be and Simon & Garfunkel earned the standing ovations they received.

The highlight was Bridge Over Troubled Water, even though the mic went off part way through. The audience started singing to compensate, prompting Art Garfunkel to thank us and say that was the most helpful thing an audience had even done for them.

s&g hp


Saturday’s Smiles

13/06/2009

It had to be related to Simon and Garfunkel:

 

song chart memes

From GraphJam

SInging from the same song sheet:

Hat Tip: MatthewL Musings

 


The Boxer

13/06/2009

How anything which aims to hurt an opponent can be classified as sport, escapes me, but I still like this song.


El Condor Pasa

13/06/2009

The first of two Simon and Garfunkel posts for Saturday: El Condor Pasa.


Sound of Silence

12/06/2009

One of the annual inter-house fixtures at Waitaki Girls’ High School was the choir contest.

My house, Gibson, chose to sing Sound of Silence in 1974 – but I don’t think we did it quite as well as Simon and Garfunkel.


Homeward Bound

11/06/2009

Simon & Garfunkel are Homeward Bound.


I Am A Rock

10/06/2009

This song always reminds me of Donne’s line, no man is an island, entire of itself. . .


Feeling Groovy

09/06/2009

Does anyone say groovy any more?

It was the word of the moment way back in the late 60s and early 70s when Simon and Garfunkel were singing The 59th Street Bridge Song/Feeling Groovy.


Scarborough Fair/Canitcle

07/06/2009

Scarborough Fair originated from a charter given by Henry III in 1253.

The ballad featured on Simon and Garfunkel’s 1966 album, Parsley, Sage, Rosemary & Thyme:


Getting the numbers

21/04/2009

Commentators seem to be agreed that Melissa Lee is the favourite to win the National nomination for the Mount Albert by-election.

I have no inside knowledge of her, any other candidates or the views of members in the electorate.

But I do know the party rules and that some favourites have been overtaken in the past by nominees who had a better understanding of what was required –  support from more than 50% of members or voting delegates, in the electorate.

Progressive voting is used so if a nominee doesn’t get at least half the votes in the first ballot the name of the lowest polling nominee is removed and everyone votes again, and if necessary, again until someone crosses the 50% threashold.

Providing an electorate has more than 200 members, and I think  Mount Albert does, it is only the members from the electorate who vote.  The members decide at their AGM if voting will be by universal suffrage or if it’s to be done by delegates with one for every set number of members.

Some high flyers in previous selections have either not understood this or have understood but still failed to win over enough delegates and missed out. David Kirk didn’t get the selection for Tamaki after Rob Muldoon’s retirement because Clem Simich had the numbers

But it’s quite simple. Candidate selection in the National Party, unlike other parties which give at least some of the power to its hierachy,  is grass roots democracy. The winning nominee is the one who wins the support of at least half the members or voting delegates in the electorate and that’s done the old fashioned way by letting them get to know you and convincing them you have the skills and abilities to be a good electorate MP.

John Key has announced the by-election date. It’s June 13th which is also the date Simon and Garfunkel will be playing in Auckland and the All Blacks have a test match in Dunedin., not that either will be relevant becasue both will take past after polling closes.

UPDATE: Lou taylor at No Minister  has another perspective on the by-election


When you’re weary . . .

03/04/2009

Simon and Garfunkel’s greatest hits was the first LP I ever bought and Bridge Over Troubled Water has remained one of my favourite songs.

They’re sure to be singing that when they’re in Auckland for a concert in June. I don’t know if I’ll be there, but it’s definitely on my wish-list.

dairy-10001

Bomber has written a haiku to celebrate 

Zen Tiger posts on the sounds of unsilence. 


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