Rural round-up

February 3, 2015

Tips to help farmers get through – Sally Rae:

Otago Rural Support Trust co ordinator David Mellish offers some advice to farmers facing the dual challenges of a low dairy payout and a very dry season.

The Otago economy relies heavily on a strong and thriving agribusiness sector.

The agricultural sector faces two potentially significant challenges at present _ the low dairy payout and the very dry season. . .

Westmere Lavender business a personal purple patch – Sally Rae:

Sam Laugesen admits to being an avid animal collector.

Joining the 1400 cows on the Kurow dairy farm on which she lives with partner Luke Campbell and daughters Daisy (4) and Sylvie (3) is her very own farmyard, open to the public, alongside her new small business, Westmere Lavender.

It is home to a variety of chooks, miniature and full sized horses, a sheep, kunekune pigs and Highland cattle, with delightful monikers, such as Handbag the steer.

”I call this my farmlet. All this is mine, the [dairy] cows don’t come here,” she said, as she indicated the paddocks around her lavender patch. . .

Dry will restrict GDP growth – Sally  Rae:

The dry conditions plaguing farmers seem set to take a toll of the economy, with expectations they will take a ”significant chunk” out of total GDP growth over the first half of the year.

Although Westpac economists did not expect it to result in a recession (two quarters of negative growth), given the positive momentum in the rest of the economy, they expected GDP growth to be ”very low” over the coming two quarters.

Dry conditions were most intense on the east coast of both islands but were becoming more widespread. . .

Encouraging signs as Yili MOU takes first steps:

Lincoln University hosted senior management from both Inner Mongolia Yili Industrial Group and its subsidiary Oceania Dairy last week in discussions aimed at building on the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed between Lincoln University and Yili in 2014.

The group was headed by Dr Xiaopeng Huang, deputy director of Yili‘s Innovation Centre, and Mr Shane Lodge, Quality and Compliance Manager of Oceania Dairy.

A range of topics were discussed during the visit, with a particular emphasis on value chains. The visit also included presentations and demonstrations on Lincoln University’s ‘paddock to plate’ research. . .


Rural round-up

August 1, 2014

Westland forecast follows Fonterra’s suit:

The dairy cooperative, Westland Milk Products, has charted a similar course to Fonterra’s benchmark forecast released yesterday for the current 2014/15 season, by announcing a pay-out forecast of $6 to $6.40 per kilogram of Milksolids (kg/MS).

“Given Fonterra’s announcement yesterday, farmer-shareholders on the Coast appreciate this early heads-up from our co-op,” says Renee Rooney, Federated Farme0rs Dairy chairperson.

“Even better is firming confirmation of the 2013/14 final payout in the $7.50 – $7.70 kg/MS range. Of course we’ve got retentions on top but it is set to be a good payout and Westland’s supplier communication has been pretty good. . .

Heads of Agreement and Strategic Relationship formed between Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Apa and Lincoln University:

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Apa and Lincoln University today announced the signing of a Heads of Agreement and Strategic Relationship.  This relationship agreement forms the basis for partnerships across education, training, research and commercial development.  The Ngā Wairiki-Ngāti Apa people of Whangaehu, Rangitīkei and Turakina own the Rūnanga, and have interests in seeing their people developed in all levels of the primary industries.  The Rūnanga is also keen to see the general Māori population in the region given better access to primary sector training and tertiary education.

Rūnanga Chairman Pahia Turia said that “Through our Treaty settlements we have land, and we have recently established Te Hou Farms Limited Partnership which purchased the historic Flock House farms near Bulls, early in June.  We are therefore committed investors in the primary sector, and we have a real interest in seeing our own people developed and working at all levels in the primary sector on and around our investments.” . . .

The Changing Face of the Global Dairy Industry:

Standing in front of the milk powder dryer of Oceania Dairy Limited’s new factory at Glenavy, Shane Lodge has a feeling of deja vu – but with a difference.

Shane’s 30 year career in the dairy industry has seen him involved in new plant construction for Fonterra and New Zealand Dairy Limited. The difference this time, is that Oceania’s owners are Chinese and that is a reflection of the changing face of the global dairy industry. . .

How to take the anxiety out of farm succession planning:

Many farmers put succession planning into the too hard basket because of rising capital values, but it’s a crucial process that will be a lot less fraught with danger if family members are involved in the process, says Neil McAra, Crowe Horwath’s Managing Principal – Southland.

“It’s never too early to start planning for retirement and farm succession,” said Mr McAra, who noted that one key to a successful plan was distinguishing between reward for services provided by family members and the risk/reward for ownership/investment in the business.

Another key element was for the farm owners to ensure they had considered whether they would have an ongoing role in the business, and define what that role would be.
“To alleviate the possibility of things getting off track, it is important to ensure that owners adequately plan for the future of the farm and the people within it, so that all runs smoothly and they can enjoy the transition process.” . .

Fisheries (Foreign Charter Vessels and Other Matters) Amendment Bill passes third reading:

A bill to strengthen the regulation of foreign-owned commercial fishing vessels operating in New Zealand waters has passed its third and final reading in Parliament today.

The Fisheries (Foreign Charter Vessels and Other Matters) Bill will require all foreign charter vessels to carry the New Zealand flag from 1 May 2016, and operate under full New Zealand legal jurisdiction.

“This bill will help maintain our reputation around the world. It shows that we are serious about the fair treatment of fishing crews, the safety of vessels and New Zealand’s international reputation for ethical and sustainable fishing practices,” Mr Guy says. . .

Seafood New Zealand Says Kaikoura Conservation Legislation a Community Template:

Seafood New Zealand has hailed the passage of the Kaikoura (Te Tai-o-Marokura) Marine Management Bill by Parliament today as a template for seafood and environment conservation measures throughout New Zealand.

Parliament passed the bill into law on the last day of sitting before the House rose for the election campaign.

Seafood New Zealand Chief Executive Tim Pankhurst says the legislation is designed to serve the long term interests of those who use and enjoy the Kaikoura coastline. . .

Rural Valuer recognised with top industry award:

QV registered Valuer David Paterson has had his outstanding service to the valuation profession recognised with the New Zealand Institute of Valuers (NZIV) Premier Award – the John M Harcourt Memorial Award.

Paterson, who has been a valuer for more than 30 years and is the National Manager of QV business, Rural Value, accepted the award in front of 300 attendees at the NZIV conference in Rotorua earlier this month.

He told the audience, “I feel honoured to receive this award, especially when you note some of the previous recipients.” . .

Aussie investors to sell their NZ vineyard investments:

The high value of the New Zealand dollar has motivated the Australian owners of several vineyards in the heart of New Zealand’s premier sauvignon blanc grape growing region to place two of their properties on the market for sale.

Both neighbouring vineyards are in the highly-fertile Waihopai Valley in Marlborough. The larger of the two vineyards is a 43 hectare holding – with almost 38 hectares planted in a mix of sauvignon blanc and pinot gris varieties. The second vineyard is a 36 hectare landholding planted in almost 24 hectares of sauvignon blanc grapes. . . .

 


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