Rural round-up

01/05/2017

$6 a kilo for greasy wool is realistic – Alan Williams:

A wool price of $6 a kilogram greasy is being targeted by a Federated Farmers strategy being developed as necessary for the industry to achieve sustainable returns.

An industry levy was not part of the work being done, federation national meat and fibre group chairman Rick Powdrell said.

Getting detailed information on what happened to New Zealand wool overseas and where it went were key parts of the project. . . 

Fight for Feds top job likely – Annette Scott:

Competition is ramping up as nominations open for the Federated Farmers national board’s changing of the guard.

Speculation pointed to a challenge for the national leadership as president William Rolleston ended his three-year term.

The annual meeting was scheduled for June 22 in Wellington. Both the president and vice-president roles would come up for grabs.

Current vice-president Anders Crofoot, also at the end of his three-year term, confirmed he would stand for president. . . 

Meat co-ops search for winning formula – Tony Benny:

New Zealand’s two big meat co-ops, Silver Fern Farms and Alliance Group have both had new CEOs at the helm for the past two years, each charged with improving returns to their farmer-shareholders. Dean Hamilton and David Surveyor talked to Tony Benny.

When Dean Hamilton and David Surveyor each came from Melbourne to take top jobs in the New Zealand meat industry, little did they know they’d almost been next door neighbours before coming here.

Silver Fern Farms chief executive Hamilton recalls his first meeting with Surveyor when the subject of where they’d lived in Melbourne came up.

“I said I was in East Melbourne. He said, ‘So was I, what street?’. I said, ‘Central Park Road’. He looked at me and he said, ‘I was in Central Park Road too’, and it ended up we were only ten houses away but I’d never met him.” . . 

ACCC court action against Murray Goulburn applauded – Shan Goodwin:

FEDERAL Court action instigated by the competition watchdog against big dairy co-operative Murray Goulburn has been heralded a significant first step to bringing long overdue fairer trading practices to the milk supply chain.

Milk producers say the move shows the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) is serious about addressing breaches of competition law in the dairy industry and lays a good foundation for the results of it’s current inquiry into the competitiveness of milk prices. . . 

Hemp seeds to be legalised as food:

An agreement reached between New Zealand and Australian food safety authorities will see hemp seed legalised as food in New Zealand, Food Safety Minister David Bennett says.

Ministers at the Australia and New Zealand Ministerial Forum on Food Regulation in Adelaide today approved a standard to allow safe levels of low-THC hemp seed as a food.

“I stated my support at the Forum today and was pleased a change to the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code was approved,” Mr Bennett says.

Mr Bennett says hemp has no psychoactive effect and has historically been used as a source of fibre and oil because it contains proteins, vitamins, minerals and fatty-acids. . . 

Rural Kiwis swipe right for country love on new farmer dating app – Jill Galloway:

Lonely Kiwi farmers are hooking into a United States based dating app to find love.

About 500 single New Zealanders are already members of the FarmersMatch dating service which has only been going since March.

Founder Derek Ma said the app could bring together single people with a love of the country. . . 

New Zealand olive oil scoops medals at international competitions:

Winners in two prestigious international Olive Oil competitions have just been announced and New Zealand features in both.
In the New York International Olive Oil Competition (NYIOOC), which is arguably the largest of international Olive Oil Competitions, Robinsons Bay and Old French Road both won GOLD with their Extra Virgin Olive Oil entries.

Both olive groves are from Akaroa and were Best in Show and Reserve Best in Show respectively at the 2016 New Zealand Extra Virgin Olive Oil Awards.
The 2017 NYIOOC attracted more than 800 entries from 26 countries and was judged by an international panel of experts. For more information see https://nyoliveoil.com/ . . .


Rural round-up

13/10/2015

Location and movement sensors thwart hive thieves – Tim Fulton:

Thieves are stealing manuka honey hives, forcing beekeepers to protect their hives using location and movement sensors.

Manuka-rich regions like Northland and Waikato, down to the wide-open pastures and hill country of the South Island, are being targeted.

Federated Farmers Bee Industry Group chairman John Hartnell said the country had nearly 600,000 hives –double the number at the turn of the century. . .

Love of dairying overcomes cow allergy – Barbara Gillham:

An allergy to cows has not stopped Sheree Walters from fulfilling her dream of dairy farming.

She feels she has time and experience on her side as she works toward her ultimate goal of running her own run-off block.

Currently working as a support technician for  on their 2700ha dairy farm near the small rural community of Hororata in North Canterbury, Walters says she has always loved dairy farming.

Although her parents did not farm, she was fortunate to have an uncle that had a dairy farm and lived nearby.

“When I was younger I always used to go to his farm after school and help out; he milked about 150 cows and I was always down there any chance I had,” she says. . . 

Hopes for better rural health services:

NZLocums, A recruitment division of the NZ Rural General Practice Network, has placed its first nurse practitioner in a permanent role in a New Zealand rural general practice.

Network chairwoman and Temuka nurse practitioner Sharon Hansen hopes for more such appointments, saying these nurse practitioners in rural areas are “absolutely” positive for the community.

Nurse practitioners have master’s degrees and must go through an extensive assessment by the Nursing Council. They can do a wider range of duties than other nurses, including some diagnosis and prescribing of medicines. . . 

Cloudy Bay celebrates its 30th vintage wine:

Stories of entrepreneurs are usually inspiring, but not many tales are as dramatic as that of Cloudy Bay wines, whose makers are celebrating its 30th vintage.

This is the stuff of urban legend. One minute, a gung-ho Australian takes a couple of sips of Marlborough sauvignon blanc (1983), the following year he is travelling to Marlborough and unwittingly planting the seeds of one of the most successful wine brands in the last half century.

The man in question is David Hohnen. He was in Western Australia when he first tasted Marlborough sauvignon blanc, so he wasn’t exactly handy to the region.

But his sixth sense back then of right time-right place enabled him to take the plunge and investigate further. . . 

 

Farm sitters settle in – Shan Goodwin:

FARM sitting has been plugging gaps left by the trend for retired producers to relocate to the coast and the mining boom induced farm labour shortage in the past decade, but now it’s emerging as the newest agriculture profession.

Attracted by the extensive travel opportunities, diversity, flexibility and next-to-nothing living expenses of being a short-term caretaker of somebody else’s operation, experienced farmers are selling up to become full-time farm sitters.

Rural community and farm industry leaders say the growth of the concept of farm sitting has many pluses, not the least being the retention of knowledge and skills in agriculture and the social and economic benefits of additional faces in small bush towns. . . 


Rural round-up

09/01/2015

Seasonal worker shortage in Central Otago – Dave Gooselink:

A seasonal worker shortage has been declared by the Ministry of Social Development in central Otago as cherry growers look to harvest a bumper summer crop.

That will see work visa rules relaxed for overseas holidaymakers for the next six weeks so that cherries won’t have to be left on the trees.

At the Roxburgh Packhouse a lack of rain has helped produce the biggest crop in years, which is now being processed for the export market.

Summerfruit NZ chairman Gary Bennetts says they’re on track, if the weather stays right, to double the tonnage that was exported from New Zealand last year. . .

Corn seed not so sweet – Gerard Hutching:

A batch of old sweet corn seed given out by McCains to its Hawke’s Bay growers this spring failed to germinate.

A spokesman for McCain Foods confirmed that some “non-performing” sweet corn seed had been distributed to a number of growers in Hawke’s Bay area.

“As soon as the problem was identified, McCain Foods issued new sweet corn seed and a replanting programme was immediately put in place with all costs being met by the company,” the spokesman said. . .

Bill Taylor is dedicated to deer – Diane Bishop:

When Bill Taylor was a boy, deer were wild animals that could only be admired from afar.

All that changed with live deer capture in the 1970s, although it wasn’t until the mid 1980s that Taylor started farming them.

“I had a real passion for deer. I still have,” Taylor said.

His family have farmed at Lora Gorge, near Winton, since 1872, and he and wife Jill were one of the first recipients of the Century Farm and Station Awards. . .

Silver Fern’s Rob Hewett up for top jobs

Silver Fern Farms chairman Rob Hewett is in a three-way race for two seats on the meat exporting and processing co-operative’s board.

Director nominations were confirmed yesterday including for Hewett and Herstall Ulrich who retire by rotation in line with company policy and have advised they will stand for re-election.

The incumbents will vie for the seats with Fiona Hancox, a West Otago sheep and beef farmer who has the backing of the Meat Industry Excellence group seeking reform in the meat industry and targeting director seats on the SFF and Alliance Group boards to hasten change. . .

It’s a country hoedown to draw crowds

Wairarapa’s own “hoedown” is attracting greater numbers of crooners, yodellers, line dancers, and wannabe Willie Nelsons and Dolly Partons, says its organiser.

The third annual Clareville Country Music Festival kicks off Friday afternoon at Clareville Showgrounds, with organiser Ray Beale expecting “a few thousand” country fans – and a couple of hundred caravans.

Mr Beale, Wairarapa A&P Society complex manager, said numbers of festival goers had jumped significantly since its debut in 2013, jumping from about “1500 to 2000” to near 4000 at last year’s event. . .

 Team penning champs in it for fun – Shan Goodwin:

THEY have plenty of wins, but for these Clarence Valley team penning champs the sport is as much about fun as it is about ribbons and prize money.

And that is precisely why their parents, and fellow club members at Clarence Valley Team Penning, believe the sport is so valuable – it encourages the development of some very important life skills.

“We joke that the boys don’t like getting beaten but team penning gives our kids, and everybody involved, so much more than just a chance to try to win something,” said Karen Morgan, vice president of the Clarence club, and mum to Tom.

“It’s such a healthy thing for families to be involved in.” . . .


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