$3k sweetener for Chch job seekers

May 7, 2014

The government has announced a $3,000 sweetener for job seekers who move to Christchurch for work.

The Government is providing further support for the Canterbury rebuild with $3.5 million of new operating funding for 2014/15 in Budget 2014 to assist beneficiaries to take up work in Christchurch.

“We’re offering up to 1,000 beneficiaries a one-off payment of $3,000 each if they have a full-time job offer in Canterbury and are ready and willing to move there,” Social Development Minister Paula Bennett says.

“The rebuild is creating thousands of jobs in Christchurch, and there are people around New Zealand ready to take them up, but who don’t currently have the means to get there.

“With an unemployment rate in Canterbury of 3.4 per cent – lower than the 6 per cent rate nationally – there are plenty of opportunities. There is demand not only in construction, but in hospitality, retail and many other industries too.

“Work and Income will be working closely with employers to connect them with beneficiaries who’d be suited to work for them, and I’m confident this incentive will provide a boost for the rebuild, and for the employment prospects of beneficiaries,” Mrs Bennett says.

The $3,000 payment will help beneficiaries with the move to Canterbury, sorting accommodation, clothing, tools and any other purchases they might need to make when getting settled.

This offer will be open to beneficiaries of all ages, but a particular focus will be placed on young people aged 18-24 years, as the rebuild provides the opportunity for them to gain employment skills that will set them up for life.

To qualify, the job offered must be for over 30 hours a week, and for longer than 91 days. The payment will be non-taxable, and exempt from an income and asset test.

If the recipient goes back on benefit within three months of the payment without a sufficient reason, then the payment must be repaid.

This initiative will cover jobs within the geographical areas of Ashburton, Hurunui, Selwyn, and Waimakariri District Councils, and the Christchurch City Council.

Christchurch needs more workers.

People in other places need work but might not be able to afford the costs of shifting.

This initiative will help solve both problems.

Another way to move off welfare, and into work. It helps Christchurch with its rebuild and gives a hand up to someone in need of a job that wants to work.


How long does it take to select a candidate

April 6, 2014

Labour lists its candidate selection timetable which include:

East Coast Bays – nominations opened October 7th and closing April 28th.

Selwyn – nominations opened December 6th and closing April 28th.

How long does it take to select a candidate?

It’s a serious business but nearly seven months to select a candidate for East Coast Bays and nearly five months to select one for Selwyn makes it into an unnecessarily drawn out process.

 


One of biggest electorates will get smaller

October 8, 2013

Statistics New Zealand’s release of census data yesterday gives the first indication of changes in electorates.

  • The number of electorates will increase from 70 to 71 at the next general election.
  • The number of North Island general electorates will increase from 47 to 48.
  • The number of Māori electorates will remain at seven.
  • The number of general electorates in the South Island is set at 16 by the Electoral Act 1993.
  • In a 120-seat parliament (excluding any overhang seats), a total of 71 electorates will result in 49 list seats being allocated. This is one less list seat than in the 2011 General Election.
  • The Representation Commission can now review the electorate boundaries for the next general election.

The excel sheet under downloads on the link above shows population changes in electorates.

Kiwiblog has checked that out and found:

Since the 2006 census, the SI electoral population has grown by 3.7%, the NI by 6.6% and the Maori electoral population by just 0.9%.

The seats that are the most over quota and must lose territory are:

  1. Auckland Central 70,406
  2. Hunua 68,951
  3. Helensville 68,026
  4. Selwyn 67,818
  5. Rodney 67,134
  6. Wigram 65,433
  7. Waitaki 64,962
  8. Hamilton East 64,577
  9. Waimakariri 64,454
  10. Wellington Central 64,374
  11. Rangitata 64,142
  12. East Coast Bays 64,005
  13. Maungakiekie 63,274
  14. Epsom 62,990
  15. Tāmaki 62,779
  16. Tauranga 62,741

So those 16 seats must shrink. What seats are under the 5% tolerance and must grow:

  1. Christchurch East 45,967
  2. Port Hills 53,667
  3. East Cost 53,960
  4. Christchurch Central 54,104
  5. Rangitikei 56,364

The other 49 seats can stay the same size in theory. But it is likely many will have some change because of flow on effects from neighbours.

The migration after Christchurch’s earthquakes is probably the reason for most of the growth in Waimakariri and Selwyn.

They will lose some ground to boost the Christchurch electorates which now have too few people.

Selwyn might have to push south into Rangitata which will then extend into Waitaki, both of which are over quota. It would make sense for the area closest to Timaru which moved from what was the Aoraki Electorate into Waitaki, to be in Rangitata.

Waitaki will have to shrink. It is now 34,888 square kilometres in area, the third biggest general electorate in the country. Any reduction in its size will be welcomed by its MP Jacqui Dean and her constituents.


Many measures of diversity

November 30, 2011

Green Party MP Catherine Delahunty is unhappy about the first decline in the number of women MPs since MMP was introduced and is blaming National.

National having only three female MPs in the top 20 shows a lack of commitment to gender representation.

“No country or Parliament is better off if women are blocked from political leadership,” Ms Delahunty said.

No-one’s blocking anyone and it’s got nothing to do with National’s commitment to gender representation.

National has a lot of electorate MPs which reduces the number of places available on the list, many are long serving, including those selected before MMP was introduced.

Among those with relatively new MPs are the three big central South Island electorates Waitaki, Rangitata and Selwyn, which might be regarded by some as conservative. All are represented by National women, – Jacqui Dean, Jo Goodhew and Amy Adams respectively. So is Waimakariri which Kate Wilkinson won on Saturday and Nicky Wagner is waiting for specials to see if she can take Christchurch Central which finished with a draw on election night.

There haven’t been many opportunities for new candidates in the last two elections but it is probable that a good number of the older MPs will retire this term or next which will provide openings for new entrants.

Anyone, man or woman, who wants to be a National MP should start working towards selection now if they haven’t already done so. That means taking an active role in the party and building up membership.

National is the only party which allows members to choose their candidate providing an electorate has sufficient members to do so.Candidates who’ve proven themselves as active members will have a better chance of winning selections.

Gaining selection with the support of members is far better than hoping you’ll get a winnable list place through tokenism.

Kiwiblog has a chart showing the demographics  of the new parliament, illustrating gender isn’t the only measure of diversity.

What he doesn’t show though is what the MPs did before entering parliament nor how many got a pay rise and how many took a cut.

That’s another measure of diversity in which I suspect National would do very well.


Southland most affordable

December 4, 2008

Following the previous post on Queenstown Lakes being the most affluent district in the country, a related report  found that Southland had the most affordable property.

The most important measure of affordability is to compare house prices with income levels. . . (then)  we took our top 20 performers and scored them against the primary measure of house price v. income levels.  But then we also looked at each place and awarded further points based upon how well they ranked against:

   *  Rent / income levels

   *  % of people living in crowded dwellings

*  Unemployment rates

   *  % of people living in owned homes

* % of people living in high deprivation deciles

And the top 20 most affordable places in New Zealand were:

 

1

Southland District

2

Selwyn

3

Timaru

4

Waitaki

5

Ashburton

6

Waimakiriri

7

Manawatu

8

Invercargill

9

South Taranaki

10

Waikato

11

Masterton

12

Horowhenua

13

Waipa

14

Wanganui

15

Gisborne

16

Franklin

17=

Upper Hutt

17=

Rotorua

19

Palmerston North

20

Dunedin

 

Snapshots:

 House price / income ratio

Best

Southland District

3.6 times income

Worst

Tauranga

8.1 times income

Rent payments / income ratio

Best

Southland District

12% of income

Worst

Dunedin

28% of income

% of people in crowded dwellings

Best

Southland District

3%

 

Selwyn

3%

Worst

Manukau

25%

% of people in the 3 highest deprivation deciles

Best

Selwyn

1%

Worst

Far North

63%

% of people unemployed

Best

Southland District

2%

 

Queenstown

2%

Worst

Whakatane

8%

 

Far North

8%

% of dwellings owned

Best

Waimakiriri

71%

Worst

Auckland

42%

 

Dunedin’s poor showing in the income to rent ratio is easily explained by the high proportion of out-of-town students who live there in rented flats.

And Selwyn which was the second most affordable district was also the 6th most affluent which is a happy combination.


Connell resigns

August 28, 2008

Rakaia MP Brian Connell  is leaving parliament early to begin work in Brisbane.

Mr Connell had advised Speaker Margaret Wilson that he was resigning as an MP as of August 31.

The MP is suspended from the National caucus as a result of challenging former National leader Don Brash about an alleged affair. He had hoped that new leader John Key would allow him back into the fold, but it never happened.

He said he was going to work for a multinational consulting company for a “substantial” salary” and the move was in the best interests of his constituents.

A by-election is not necessary because the vacancy occurs within six months of a general election.

It wasn’t what Connell did but the way he did it that was wrong and Key was right not to reinstate him. That  sent a much-needed message that MPs whose actions damage the party have no place in caucus.

However, Connell’s behaviour since Key became leader has been exemplary and he’s found himself a good job in the real world.

Contrast that with Georgina Beyer who announced her resignation but didn’t step down for several months so she continued receiving her parliamentary salary over the summer break. In that time she was rehearsing for a play at the Fortune Theatre but she pulled out just before opening night leaving the theatre with the costs. And now she’s complaining because her former colleagues haven’t appointed her to a well paid job.

Aoraki MP Jo Goodhew  is standing for National in the new Rangitata electorate and Amy Adams  is the party’s candidate in the new electorate of Selwyn which cover most of what was the Rakaia seat.


%d bloggers like this: