Political Compass

05/07/2018

Scrubone is back and is inviting us to do the Political Compass test.

I scored:

Economic left/right 3.0

Social libertarian/authoritarian -3.79

personalised chart

Scrubone has the results from the past which showed me as 3.5 on the left/right and -.5 on the libertarian/authoritarian.

Does this mean I’m a bit closer to the centre and more liberal or that when, as many questions left me wanting to put neutral/don’t know, I went to the more liberal answer more often this time?


In-season produce cheaper

19/08/2011

I picked up a couple of capsicums and half a dozen kiwifruit on my way round the supermarket without looking at the prices.

When I got to the checkout I found that the two capsicums cost nearly $5 each but the six kiwifruit came to just 93 cents.

The lesson from that is to buy in-season. 

Horticulture New Zealand points out  that seasonality and weather have a big impact on prices:

Horticulture NZ says . . .  an expected shortage of some vegetables due to this week’s adverse weather, highlights the seasonality of produce which determines the retail price.

Chief executive Peter Silcock says a lot of the products that are expensive now such as tomatoes, capsicums and lettuces, are not in season now so therefore they will not be cheap.

Another lesson is that I’d have gained a lot more from the removal of GST from buying the out-of-season capcicums than in-season kiwifruit.

That’s not surprising. Geoff Simmons points out there are holes in Labour’s health by stealth line.

The poorest 10 per cent of New Zealand families spend about $10 a week on fruit and vegetables. At the other end of the spectrum, the richest 10 per cent spend around $30 a week.

This means taking GST off fruit and vegetables will give the poorest just over $1 extra a week. That will barely make a dent in their food bill. Meanwhile, the richest will get just under $4.

John Pagani disputes that but Scrubone dug deeper and found

In short, there is basically no evidence that this policy will do a heck of a lot – and that’s an admission from people who really really wish it did.

The removal of GST from fresh fruit and vegetables is a feel-good policy based on emotion not fact.

It might reduce the price but not significantly for the people who need it most.


Increase in women MPs slowed under MMP

25/09/2010

MMP was supposed to help women enter parliament but has it?

Scrubone has a graph which shows the increase in the number of women MPs has slowed since MMP was introduced:

Pre the 1980s, clearly there was an upward trend for many years followed by some stagnation. But after 1978, numbers of women MPs shot up from 5% to 22%.

After the first MMP election however, something strange happened. The improvement has been much slower. Slower than the pre-MMP, and vastly slower than the 80′s and early 90′s trend. So things are getting better, but slowly – that’s point 1.

Now, think about this. Those big gains were made when all MPs were electorate MPs.

Scrubone also found that not only had the increase in the number of women MPs slowed, it was even slower for electorates.

There’s another, very obvious conclusion that can be taken from exactly the same data. MMP has meant that parties don’t need to take seriously the idea of equality anymore. Why bother to get a wide range of candidates in seats when you can just promote them in the list? That to me is a should be listed as a negative.

So is MMP really better for women’s representation in parliament? I see a reduction in the rate of increase that could hardly be more clear, plus a change in behaviour in that women are pushed from electorates into the list.

Is that really progress?

He’s got graphs to show that too . He worked on percentages so this trend has nothing to do with there being fewer electorate seats since MMP was introduced.

MMP has made electorates bigger geographically which makes them more difficult to serve and much harder to balance work and family responsibilities. That could put women off standing, but women MPs hold  some of the biggest electorates.

Rahui Katene is MP for Te Tai Tonga (161,443 square kilometres), Tariana Turia is MP for Te Tai Hauauru (35,825 sq kms), Jacqui Dean holds Waitaki (34,888 sq km),  Anne Tolley holds East Coast (13,649),  Nanaia Mahuta holds Hauraki-Waikato ( 12,580 sq kms),  Louise Upston holds Taupo (9,101 sq kms), Amy Adams is MP for Selwyn (7,854 sq kms) and Jo Goodhew is MP for Rangitata (6,826 sq kms).

Something which may partly explain why more women are on lists than in electorates is  that only three parties, National, Labour and the Maori Party, hold electorate seats so all Act and Green MPs are list MPs.

But that doesn’t explain why the increase in the number of women in parliament has slowed under MMP.

The may be other factors other than the electoral system which have impacted on the number of women MPs since 1996. But MMP was supposed to make parliament more representative and it hasn’t lived up to that promise when it comes to gender balance.


10,000 comments

12/09/2010

The 10,000th comment on this blog was made last evening.

10,000 Comments
10,000 Approved

Thank you Scrubone for that one and thank you to all who contributed the other 9,999.

I read all of them and appreciate most of them – even many of the ones I don’t agree with.


Higher costs is the point – updated

27/05/2010

Complaints that the ETS will impose higher costs on us seem to have missed the point – that’s what it’s supposed to do.

Imposing higher costs on activities which cause emissions is designed to provide an incentive to change behaviour which will lead to reduced emissions.

Matt Nolan at The Visible Hand in Economics puts it simply:

 Even if you don’t believe in global warming, we have a liability that is based on carbon emissions.  As a nation, either people who produce the carbon pay for it – or everyone pays for it through higher taxes.

So here in lies the question – do we want higher prices for carbon goods or lower incomes because of higher taxes?  Given that the liability is a function of the amount of carbon we produce, it follows that pricing carbon on the basis of this will lead to the “best” solution – no matter what political party you support.

If the cost of something rises, it doesn’t follow that consumers’ costs will increase by the same amount.

If the price of fuel and power go up, we have a choice about paying the increase or using less. Saving fuel and power will save money. 

Using less energy and using what we do use more efficiently makes economic and environmental sense whether or not you think the climate is changing.

UPDATE:

Scrubone gets it and Kiwiblog’s post on Matt’s post has generated lots of comments.


Political compass

23/05/2010

Scrubone is still updating the political compass for bloggers.

I just did this test and got this result:

You are a right social moderate.
Right: 4.38, Libertarian: 0.94
 

And when I did  this test  today I got this result:

Economic Left/Right: 4.38
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -1.74

 

Last year when I did the tests I got these results:

dairy 10001

pol-compass

I’m not sure if the slight difference in the results is a reflection on the reliability of the tests or a small movement in my views.


Did you see the one about . . .

19/10/2009

Weatherston appeal reproach to Court of Appeal – Stephen Franks speaks sense on meritless appeals.

What makes good political interviewing? – Tim Watkins defends Guyon Espiner’s interview with Metiria Turei.

Why I bought a bookstore  Jeff Mayersohn at the Huffington Post reckons there’s a future for books and the stores which sell them.(Hat Tip: Beatties Book Blog).

Just – Stripy sock studio on being “just” a job description (Hat Tip: Art & My LIfe)

After the fisking charges are laid – feel the frsutration over political interference in roading changes from Opinionated Mummy.

Williamson and the theory of firm – Anit Dismal on the joint winner of the Nobel Prize for economics.

Fun Police # 2 Don’t let them eat cake – Liberty Scott on the birthday cake blues.

Not exactly deaf – Macdoctor says 6%  hearing loss is barely noticeable.

VUWSA’s VSM violations Scrubone guest posts at M&M on voluntary student membership machinations.

The poor are not helpless victims – Hernado de Soto – Not PC has found a hero.

Is this the worst hotel in the world? – Motella shows where not to stay.


Daylight saving poll take 2

03/10/2009

We’ve had a week of daylight saving.

In the last seven days I’ve been to Dunedin, Wellington and Wanaka and at home in North Otago.

The highest temperature in that time and those places has been17 degrees, the lowest 1 degree.

We’re in Wanaka where we woke to large white flakes falling from the sky. Mount Iron is covered in white stuff too.

In the normal course of events I’d have thought it was snow, but it can’t be that because n0-one would have been stupid enough to extend daylight saving so the clocks go forward when it’s still cold enough for snow.

In the past week I’ve had lots of conversations on the extended daylight saving period. One woman liked it because she feels she has to get up with the sun and if it gets up an hour later so does she. One man liked it because his children get up with the sun and this week they’ve been getting up an hour later.

Everyone else said it starts too soon and finishes too late. Delaying the start by three or four weeks would mean it’s lighter at both ends of the day, not so cold in the mornings and warm enough to enjoy the lighter evenings.

Sigh.

What do you think?

P.S. This is the poll I deleted by mistake last week. I thought I’d followed Scrubone’s instructions, but it still didn’t appear in the sidebar so I’ll leave it here and do my best not to delete it.


Silent protest

20/09/2009

Bhig News and Nhot PC are making silent protests.

I suppose this blog could become Omepaddock in a gesture of solidarity but I’m more in sympathy with Monkeywith Typewriter who says it’s all in the head.

I also think Kerre Woodham  makes a good point when she says:

The “h” in Michael isn’t pronounced either, but it would look jolly funny spelled Micael.

Language is a fluid thing. Regardless of what is decided officially, time and use will be the ultimate arbiters of whether its Whanganui or Wanganui.

Besides, it’s an h of a thing to be getting het up about when there are so many more important things needing urgent attention.

Update: Scrubone has a poll Wanganui – lend me your H’s (in which a pedant might point out there’s a stray apostrophe).


Stat time of the month

10/08/2009

Tim Selwyn has posted the NZ Blogospehre top-20 for June.

Scrubone has the Half Done stats for July.

Open Parachute has done the NZ blog ranks for July too, with a change in methodology which puts his rankings more in line with the other two.

Being out of the country for all of July with a couple of weeks with no access to a computer had an impact on visitor numbers to Homepaddock. It also showed a relationship between the number of posts and number of visitors.

I’d expected fewer posts to result in fewer return visits but it appears to also have led to fewer unique visits too.

homepaddock
This Year’s Visits and Page Views by Month

This Year's Visits and Page Views by Month

However, while being in the top 20 is flattering, I’m very aware of that quantity deosn’t equal quality.

To stop myself taking too much from my place in the rankings, I note that spam outweighs real comments by about 10 to 1.

If that doesn’t work I look at some of the frequently used search terms which lead people to Homepaddock. They suggest people arrive by accident while  hoping for some very strange things which they definitely won’t find here.


Putting us in our place

09/06/2009

Scrubone has posted his first draft putting us in our place on the political spectrum.

Of the eight bloggers categorised one is authoritorian left, two are authoritorian right and the rest are liberal right.

Contrast that with No Right Turn’s graphing the NZ blogosphere in 2003 – one left and one right authoritarian; 13 liberal right one liberal centre and 26 authoritarian   liberal left.

I recognise only a handful of those 2003 blogs, one of those is Big News who was liberal left then and is now authoritarian left.


Halfdone blog rankings

02/12/2008

Scrubone at Something Should Go Here Maybe Later has compiled the Half Done November blog stats the top 20 of which are:

HD Rank Blog Last Tumeke Rank Alexa Alexa NZ Authority HD Score
1 Kiwiblog #1 62615 99 252 2
2 Whale Oil Beef Hooked #7 134113 276 93 40
3 The Standard #2 199522 268 111 48
4 Public Address #3 216349 794 174 99
5 Not PC #6 239877 538 95 136
6 No Minister #4 237322 433 64 161
7 Policy Blog: Chris Trotter & Matthew Hooton #10 202188 717 60 242
8 The Hive #5 241742 602 54 269
9 New Zealand Conservative #23 359340 557 52 385
10 Homepaddock #17 358477 763 68 402
11 Tumeke! #12 436170 807 73 482
12 Dim Post #13 355942 544 39 496
13 Cactus Kate #14 347784 806 46 609
14 New Zeal #16 414241 4467 215 861
15 Poneke’s Weblog #18 527522 1575 86 966
16 Roar Prawn #11 386652 861 32 1040
17 The Inquiring Mind #15 438737 1262 50 1107
18 Frogblog #8 94021 208 118 1326
19 Something should go here, maybe later. #34 811342 1529 66 1880
20 No Right Turn #9 907936 3070 129 2161

The blogosphere had some comings and goings in November – Roarprawn took a holiday, but has returned; Matthew Hooton and Chris Trotter left Policyblog but the latter moved to Bowalley Road, Anti-Dismal and The Hive closed and there have been two newcomers: Dear John and The Bull Pen.

I suspect Homepaddock’s 10th spot on the Half Done rankings is a lot higher than the Tumeke! rankings which Tim Selwyn is compiling now because I’ve noticed a fall in visitors and comments since the election.

Apropos of that in November:

* I wrote 226 posts.

* Received 14,414 visitors, including the most on any one day (1,160 on November 4th because of a post about the Melbourne Cup photo finish which must have shown up  high on Google searches).

* Had 378 comments, the most on a single post was 14 on November 10 about the blue wash being bad for democracy.


Scrubone’s blog stats

15/11/2008

Scrubone has posted blog stats for the first half of November at Something Should Go Here Maybe Later.

The list goes up to 169 and the top 20 are:

Rank

Site

Alexa

Alexa NZ

Auth.

Score

1

www.Kiwiblog.co.nz

61380

95

255

2

2

www.Whaleoil.co.nz

118717

254

109

28

3

www.Thestandard.org.nz

215632

375

111

73

4

www.Publicaddress.net

197414

711

174

81

5

www.Pc.blogspot.com

243241

542

95

139

6

www.Nominister.blogspot.com

233270

369

62

139

7

www.Wellingtonhive.blogspot.com

233894

359

54

155

8

www.Nzconservative.blogspot.com

382437

533

53

385

9

www.Asianinvasion2006.blogspot.com

354539

516

46

398

10

www.Homepaddock.wordpress.com

354822

726

63

409

11

www.Tumeke.blogspot.com

456643

818

70

534

12

www.Dimpost.wordpress.com

377176

638

40

602

13

www.Adamsmith.wordpress.com

426748

994

54

786

14

www.Newzeal.blogspot.com

412032

4374

202

892

15

www.Poneke.wordpress.com

550343

1763

94

1032

16

www.Keepingstock.blogspot.com

527388

1204

32

1984

17

www.Libertyscott.blogspot.com

648509

1394

32

2825

18

www.Tvhe.wordpress.com

647618

2551

58

2848

19

www.Norightturn.blogspot.com

858163

5050

133

3258

20

www.Barnsleybill.blogspot.com

772669

1598

33

3742

 What strikes me is how much ahead of the field Kiwiblog is, and deservedly so because David Farrar consistently manages to maintain both the quantity and quality of his posts.

Scrubone explains how the rankings were reached here.


Temper, temper

15/10/2008

Oh dear, tantrums aren’t pretty, especially if you have one while accusing someone who didn’t have one of having one.

Helen Clark tripped herself up in the heat of the moment last night. It wasn’t good but she’s made it much worse by trying to explain it away with an attack on John Key:

“The fact he didn’t burst out crying on the set probably counted for him,” she said during a Radio Live question and answer session this morning.

Later in the day she didn’t resile from her criticism telling reporters that expectations around Mr Key’s performance before the debate were low and; “the fact he didn’t collapse with a stress attack on the set probably gave him marks”.

Tears, stress attack? How scary does she think she is? Is this what happens to other people who come up against her?

TVNZ’s phone poll declared him ahead by a long way.

Miss Clark said the poll was worthless as it was self-selecting and there was a charge.

“That hasn’t been the feedback we received. You’ve got to remember to call in on an 0900 number it costs money.”

That’s a fair comment, but internet access cost too and look at this:

Who won last night’s leaders’ debate?

Helen Clark (13060 votes, 48.5%)

John Key (13268 votes, 49.3%)

It was a tie (592 votes, 2.2%)

 

Back to the tantrum:

At one point Miss Clark made a comment that Mr Key may shout at home but he wouldn’t shout her down.

Today she said she was not accusing him of yelling at his family.

“What I meant was he was having a tantrum he was completely out of control trying to shout me down…”

There’s only been one person having a tantrum over this:

Last night Miss Clark said she did not think the campaign was bitter and today said she was just offering a professional analysis of how it went.

A spokesman for Mr Key said he would leave it to the public to decide.

“New Zealanders will judge the result of the debate.”

Last night asked about his inexperience Mr Key said he just did his best.

“But I gave it my best shot and they (the public) will have a good sense of where a National government would take New Zealand.”

Keeping Stock thinks Clark is showing her true colours.

No MInister says Diddums!

Monkeywith typewriter awards her a soper.

Inquiring Mind suggests the tany could be a tipping point.

Scrubone thinks she can’t handle losing.


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