Rural round-up

September 26, 2015

Beef exports hit $3 billion in record season:

The value of total goods exported was $3.7 billion in August 2015, up $197 million (5.6 percent) compared with August 2014, Statistics New Zealand said today. Meat and fruit exports led the rise.

Beef exports continued to rise, up 46 percent ($61 million) in August 2015 compared with the same month last year. The beef export season runs from 1 October to 30 September.

“With one month to go in the 2014/15 beef export season, beef exports are at a new high of $3 billion,” international statistics senior manager Jason Attewell said. “So far this season, 404,000 tonnes of beef have been exported, and if we export at least 18,000 tonnes next month we’ll surpass the peak 2003/04 season for quantity exported.” . . 

June floods cost the primary sector $70 million says MPI:

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has today released a report on the economic impacts to the primary sector of the heavy rain and flooding that affected the western North Island in June.

The total on-farm cost of the June storm affecting Taranaki and Horizons regions has been assessed at approximately $70 million with up to 800 rural properties affected.

MPI Director of Resource Policy, David Wansbrough, says the greatest impact of the storm was on sheep and beef farms, due to landslides and damage to infrastructure.

“Around 460 sheep and beef farms were affected, some with significant levels of infrastructure damage and lost productive capacity. The on-farm economic impact to sheep and beef farms is estimated to total $57.6 million. . . 

People power:

When Lyn Neeson, who farms near Taumaranui, saw the Whanganui and Ohura rivers rise rapidly in June, she figured this spelled trouble for farmers downstream and she was right. 

Since July she has been working four days a week in Whanganui as the coordinator for the RST. She has the task of assessing the reports coming to her from farmers and people such as Harry Matthews and Brian Doughty who know the region and the farmers. 

A major problem is damage to fences, she says. . . 

Origin of Beef Informs Shopper Decisions:

Consumer research shows 89 per cent of supermarket shoppers in key international beef markets consider “country of origin”, when deciding which beef product to purchase.

Beef + Lamb New Zealand chief executive Scott Champion says this insight informs how the organisation works on the ground to boost sales of New Zealand origin beef.

“We use a three-pronged approach that gives consumers reasons to buy New Zealand beef ahead of other countries. We tell the New Zealand story – including environment and animal welfare aspects – and highlight our food safety systems, as well as the health and wellbeing attributes of New Zealand beef.” . . .

Dissapointing 2014/15 result for farmers, encouraging signs for coming season:

Fonterra Shareholders’ Council Chairman, Duncan Coull, said the final payout for the 2014/15 season of $4.65 for a fully shared-up Farmer is a disappointing result for the Co-op’s Farmers.

Mr Coull: “While it is encouraging to see the improvement in Fonterra’s performance in the second half of the season Farmers will be disappointed with the 25 cent dividend which was at the lower end of their expectations.

“Farmers had an expectation the business would have been able to take greater advantage of the low Milk Price environment.”

Mr Coull was encouraged by the Co-op’s improved second-half performance which saw many parts of the business operate at a high level. . . 

Wool Market Firm:

New Zealand Wool Services International Limited’s C.E.O, Mr John Dawson reports that the South Island sale this week saw a strong market with steady support.

Of the 9,250 bales on offer 84.4 percent sold.

The weighted indicator for the main trading currencies was down 0.72 percent compared to the last sale on 17th September, helping hold up local price levels.

Mr Dawson advises that in line with other Merino growing markets, local prices for Merino Fleece 18 to 23.5 microns compared to when last sold on 10th September, saw a slight easing with prices 2 to 6 percent cheaper. . . 

Waikato modelling results show high costs to farmers and region:

DairyNZ is encouraging Waikato dairy farmers to get involved in regional policy development processes after the release of new information highlighting the potential for high costs to their businesses.

Commenting on new modelling released<http://www.waikatoregion.govt.nz/Community/Whats-happening/News/Media-releases/Models-look-at-potentially-very-large-costs-of-improving-water-quality/> today by a group of technical experts, DairyNZ’s strategy and investment leader for productivity, Bruce Thorrold says the analysis shows there is potentially a very high economic and community cost to the region of changing land use and management practices. Estimates range from $1.2 billion to $7.8 billion depending on the degree of improvement in water quality modelled.

“That’s not surprising given the size and importance of the pastoral industry in the Waikato,” he says. . .

Best Sauvignon Blanc in the World for Rapaura Springs in London:

Rapaura Springs Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2015 has impressed the judges and taken home the Sauvignon Blanc Trophy at the prestigious International Wines and Spirits Competition (IWSC) in London.

The IWSC was established in 1969 and is one of the world’s pre-eminent wine competitions, held in high regard with consumers and wine trade alike. The formidable reputation of its judging process, and judges themselves, set the standard for wine competitions globally. . . 


Rural round-up

July 16, 2015

Trade agreements add up to big savings – Gerard Hutching:

Free trade agreements with China and Taiwan helped save New Zealand $161 million through lower tariffs on sheep and beef exports in 2014.

Beef+ Lamb New Zealand chief executive Scott Champion said the tariff savings were a market access success story, enabling New Zealand to remain competitive on the global market and giving exporters the flexibility to sell products into more markets.

The sector’s export returns for the period total $7.7 billion, with the amount in tariffs paid falling from $331m in 2013 to $326m in 2014.

Meanwhile beef and veal export returns reached a record high of $2.53bn – up $686m on the corresponding period last season. . .

Charities benefit from farmers’ toil – Kate Taylor:

One of Hawke’s Bay’s oldest sheep stations has been profiled in a new book, Kereru Station: Two Sisters’ Legacy.

Kereru Station managers Danny and Robyn Angland run the business to meet the needs of the owners, a partnership between two charitable trusts set up by the late sisters, Gwen Malden and Ruth Nelson. Between them, the two trusts have gifted almost $9 million to several hundred organisations and causes, mostly in Hawke’s Bay. . .

Farm ownership in under 10 years – Tony Benny:

When David Affleck was growing up on a remote sheep, beef and deer farm at the head of Ahaura River on the West Coast, the last thing he wanted to do was milk cows. But when he was offered a job on a dairy farm in Canterbury, that soon changed.

“It wasn’t really what I wanted to do but I gave it a go and I’ve been milking cows ever since, really. I pretty much liked it straightaway and started to learn things pretty quick,” he says.

But his wife, Anna, whose family owned a dairy farm in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, has always loved cows. . . 

Work for breed recognised  – Sally Rae:

James Robertson’s lengthy involvement with Holstein Friesian New Zealand has been acknowledged.
The Outram farmer, who is the third generation of his family to belong to the association, was presented with a distinguished service award at HFNZ’s recent annual meeting in Masterton.

Dale Collie, of Carterton, also received the award, which recognises members who have contributed to the Holstein Friesian breed and the association at regional and/or national level. . . 

Bison-beef cattle cross gives beefalo – Allison Beckham:

What do you get when you cross a bison bull with a beef cow? Beefalo.

And a brand new beefalo arrival on Blair and Nadia Wisely’s Southland farm earlier this month is expected to be the start of an all local beefalo blood line.

Despite his unmasculine name, Bobo the bison – the 6 year old shaggy beast weighing 900kg the Wiselys have owned for four years – appears to have proved his parental prowess at last, successfully mating with a 50 50 bison/Charolais cow produced using bison semen imported from the United States. . . 

Truffle time in Christchurch – Ben Irwin:

What do you know about truffles?

Well, like reporter Ben Irwin, most of us probably know next to nothing about the expensive, subterranean fungus.

So Ben, wanting to educate himself and look busy, went searching for what is known as Canterbury’s Black Gold. . .

Survey maps future landscape

Landcare Research is asking farmers, foresters and growers to take part in a survey designed to show what the landscape may look in decades to come.

The survey of Rural Decision Makers was first held in 2013, in conjunction with the Ministry for the Environment. It proved so popular that Landcare Research now conducts it every two years.
The survey’s director, economist Pike Brown, said it focused on what farmers were thinking, rather than figures such as the number of stock they had.
“There’s lots of questions about how farms are managed and how forests are managed, questions about irrigation. . . 

 

 

 

 

 


Rural round-up

March 30, 2014

Deutsche Bank keeps ‘sell’ rating on Fonterra, seeks more transparency – Pattrick Smellie:

(BusinessDesk) – Fonterra Cooperative Group needs to make it far clearer to farmers and other investors how its business model operates, says Deutsche Bank after the dairy exporter shored up a slump in half-year profits by intervening in the regulated price it pays for milk at the farm gate.

Deutsche Bank retains its ‘sell’ rating on Fonterra Shareholders Fund units, with a 12-month target price of $5.64. The units slipped 0.2 percent by mid-afternoon to $6.08, and have fallen from a closing price of $6.15 on March 26, when the result for the six months to Jan. 31 was declared.

Fonterra posted a 53 percent fall in first-half net profit to $217 million, a result that would have been far worse if the cooperative had not taken the unprecedented action last December of deciding to reduce the regulated Farm Gate Milk Price (FGMP) to farmer-shareholders by 70 cents per kilogram of milk solids. . . .

New Zealand dairy farmers are responding to high prices by cranking the handle on their production to cash in on record payout – Jeff Smith:

Our dairy farmers are “cranking the handle” on production in response to high prices they are receiving for their milk.

As a result nationwide dairy production is expected to be up by 11% this current season.

Strong dairy prices have “handed the baton” to strong dairy volumes, ASB says in its economic update released today.

Volumes would be higher than normal this year as farmers had bought extra feed to increase milk production in anticipation of higher prices, ASB Bank rural economist Nathan Penny told interest.co.nz today. . . .

Farmer lands $30,000 in prizes – Elliot Parker:

Hard work has its merits.

Hinakura farmer Donald McCreary can attest to this after winning the award for the Beef and Lamb Wairarapa Farm Business of the Year and in the process scoring himself $30,000 in prizes.

McCleary has been farming in Hinakura, east of Martinborough, since 2004 on a 1375 ha property which is predominantly steep, hill country.

The property contains 6700 ewes and 225 breeding cattle.

McCreary says his approach to good farming is to be well versed in all areas of farm management. . .

Meat industry on the rise – Carmen Hall:

Higher lambing percentages and export carcass weights are helping offset a dramatic drop in sheep numbers.

Numbers have almost halved since 1991, but the amount of product being exported has remained stable as farmers focus on improving their systems.

Negative publicity has overshadowed the fact farmers have made significant gains in productivity and the industry has the potential to cash in on future growth, industry leaders are saying. Beef and Lamb New Zealand chief executive Scott Champion says the organisation focused on “best practice behind the farm gate”. . .

Finance support adds up for farmers :

Tauranga HR company Teaming Up hopes to connect accountancy firms with farmers in an economic development project that could generate millions of dollars.

The company spearheaded the Beyond Reasonable Drought inaugural road shows in the Bay of Plenty and East Coast last month, which attracted nearly 1000 people.

Marlborough sheep and beef farmer Doug Avery, who was on the brink of disaster 15 years ago after consecutive droughts, presented the seminars. He overcame adversity by adopting a scientific approach to agriculture and introducing deep-rooted, drought-tolerant lucerne. He employs six full-time staff, including son Frazer, and his business is a profitable operation that promotes high-reward, low-impact farming. . .

Honey lovers could get stung:

Honey prices could rise as much as 20 percent due to one of the worst seasons in decades.

Beekeepers say lower than usual temperatures in January meant the insects stayed inside their hives during the peak season and produced less honey. . .


Rural round-up

February 9, 2014

Agribusiness project is a classified success :

When young couple Shane Carroll and Nicola Shadbolt wanted to find equity partners to help them realise their dream of managing a big farming operation they put an advertisement in the newspaper.

“If you’ve got the money, we’ve got the expertise – let’s get together,” they said.

It worked. And 27 years later they are equity partners and managers of a diverse agribusiness in Manawatu’s picturesque Pohangina Valley.

Westview Farm is a combination of agribusinesses shaped by equity partners, farmer-managers and employees on the ground.

Carroll and Shadbolt, his wife and business partner who is well known as a Massey University professor of farm management and a Fonterra director, are the managers and part-owners of an organisation that runs dairy, deer, beef and sheep units. . .

Concerns about over-reliance on China:

A WARNING on heavy reliance on the one market of China has been sounded by Beef + Lamb NZ chief economist Andrew Burtt.

China’s continued growth as a market for New Zealand meat is one of the main trends showing in Beef + Lamb’s export figures for the 2013-14 first quarter, Burtt told Rural News. 

Mutton exports to China doubled in the first three months compared to the same quarter last year. But the continuing growth of China as a market comes with the qualification “about extrapolating that will go forever,” Burtt says. 

The other message is “that New Zealand’s traditional markets are still important to us.

Politically stable, economically stable, and they are wealthy and remain important”. . .

Farmers must look beyond farm on sustainability:

THE DAIRY industry’s contribution to sustainability shouldn’t be confined within the farmgate, says Hauraki Plains farmer Conall Buchanan.

Apart from keeping their farms environmentally sound, involvement in local schools and community projects allows interaction and helps improve public perception of dairy farming and farmers.

Buchanan notes in Hauraki Plains a natural link between the farming sector and the community, high levels of interaction allowing community concerns to be passed to farmers. . .

Women make an impression in dog trialling:

A couple of female dog triallists gave their male counterparts something to think about at the Oxford Collie Club’s Dog Trials.

In a historically male-dominated sport, the top two places in the zig zag hunt, judged by Perry May, went to Nicky Thompson and runner-up Steph Tweed.

The trials have been held by the club for the past 94 years.

This year’s event was held in near-perfect conditions, barring some late southerly rain on day two, when most courses were nearing completion.

Club president Lionel Whitwell said the decline in sheep farming had affected many dog trial clubs, and the triallists were fortunate that good-quality sheep had been sourced from local farmers Alan and Wayne Feary. . .

4 weird things dairy farmers are obsessed with – Modern Milk Maid:

Fat

Nothing to do with their own weight or others. Dairy farmers in Canada are paid based on the “components” of milk-butterfat, protein, and other solids such as lactose. Butterfat is the moneymaker, and every farmer I know loves to compare their results. Fun fact-whole milk is only 3.25% fat! My herd is currently averaging 4.3%. Low butterfat can indicate illness. Diet, genetics, and cow comfort all contribute to how much fat a cow will produce.

Semen 

Bull semen, that is. Choosing a bull that fits with your herd goals-improving looks, milk yield, or health traits is a never ending task. . .

Top German chefs light fire under lamb promotion:

WHEN FARMERS raced Michelin four-star chefs to create the best barbecue lamb dish, the results were mouthwatering. 

The New Zealand Lamb BBQ Masterchef contest  was held at Rob Buddo’s farm, Poukawa, Hawke’s Bay on January 29.

Judges were Black Barn Bistro chef Terry Lowe, Progressive Meats managing director Craig Hickson, Beef + Lamb NZ chief executive Scott Champion and gourmet BBQ chef Raymond van Rijk.

The winning team was Angus Irvine and Sam Morrah, of Central Hawke’s Bay, guided by chef Markus Philippi prompting diners’ satisfaction. . .

 


Rural round-up

September 21, 2013

Champions drive clean streams – Jon Morgan:

Ossie Latham introduces himself as a tree hugger. But he’s more than that. He’s a tree hugger who aims to get everyone in Manawatu’s Mangaone West catchment hugging trees with him.

He’s a farmer who headed to Auckland to make his fortune in business before retiring back home to a small farm.

And he’s also one of Alastair Cole’s community champions. Cole, Landcare Trust’s regional co-ordinator, looks for enthusiastic volunteers to drive environmental protection.

Three big projects are underway in the region, all with the aim of making the Manawatu River cleaner. . .

Global Beef Priorities Advanced at Five Nations Conference – says Beef + Lamb New Zealand:

International trade was front and centre of discussions at the Five Nations Beef Alliance (FNBA) conference in Cairns Australia last week.

Beef + Lamb New Zealand Chair-Elect, James Parsons led New Zealand’s participation in the annual conference of beef cattle producer organisations from Canada, the United States, Mexico, Australia and New Zealand. Chief Executive, Scott Champion and General Manager Market Access, Ben O’Brien also attended alongside three “young ranchers” Richard Morrison (of Marton), Pete Fitz-Herbert (of Hunterville) and Lauren McWilliam (of Masterton).

The key action item was the signing of a position statement on the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations. . .

Farmers face two-year wait for new green scheme – Johann Tasker:

Environmental schemes that reward farmers who look after the English countryside will be closed to most new applicants for two years as the government implements CAP reform, it has emerged.

In a move described by some critics as a “massive threat” to wildlife and the countryside, DEFRA has no plans to let farmers sign new agri-environment agreements during the whole of 2015 as the department develops a successor to its existing environmental stewardship scheme. . .

Minister attending Inter-American agricultural conference:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy will depart for Argentina tomorrow to attend the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA) conference.

“This will be a valuable opportunity to meet with my counterparts from Latin America, the US, Canada and the Caribbean, to discuss some of the issues and opportunities facing the agricultural sector across the world.

“Some of the issues covered will include the work of the Global Research Alliance of which New Zealand is a major supporter, and the importance of water storage and management.”

Mr Guy will also visit Uruguay and Paraguay to meet with officials and his Ministerial counterparts. . .

Bumblebee talents being recognised – Richard Rennie:

The humble bumblebee is about to get a boost for its pollination skills from scientists and farm retailers this spring.

For the first time Farmlands is selling commercial box hives of bumblebees to kiwifruit and avocado growers, while scientists celebrate funding for more research into the bee.

Farmlands’ Te Puna branch in western Bay of Plenty is the first to start marketing the bees. . .

Horses sell at a brisk trot – Murray Robertson:

THE annual horse fair at Matawhero yesterday attracted about 140 head, with a top price of $3500 paid for a nine-year-old gelding — and an almost total clearance.

Thirty “broken” horses were sold and about 100 “unbroken” changed hands.

Only about six animals remained unsold at the end of the three-hour sale. . .


Rural round-up

August 14, 2011

Quenching our thirst for water – Paul Callow:

Developing greater access to irrigation is critical to our economic prosperity and the private sector will likely play a big part.

New Zealand’s economy is heavily dependent on the agriculture sector for generating much of our wealth and wellbeing. The sector itself depends on a range of inputs, but by far the most important is water – you only have to look at the devastating effect recent droughts have had on dairy, lamb and beef production to realise just how important.

Interestingly, the problem is not that there isn’t enough water in an absolute sense; it is just that it often isn’t available in the right place at the right time . . .

NZ workers ‘lazy, unmotivated’: farmer – Sally Rae:

Productivity has soared since the Bloem family employed Filipino workers at its Highcliff piggery.

Long-time pig farmer Peter Bloem estimated his operation was producing an extra 1500 pigs a year from the same number of sows.

He had become frustrated with New Zealand workers who were “lazy, unmotivated and didn’t want to go the extra mile to learn anything”.

Training makes for better staff – Sally Rae:

When Brendan Morrison returned home to the family dairy farm in South Otago, his father encouraged him to do some further training.

Mr Morrison (22), who won this year’s Otago dairy trainee of the year in the New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards, has completed training with AgITO from levels 3 to 4 and is enrolled in the national certificate in agribusiness management, agribusiness resource management, level 5. . .

Arthur’s nearly 80 and still on the job – Sue Newman:

Arthur Maude might be close to 80, but he reckons that’s got nothing to do with his ability to work.
He still puts in a fair day’s work for a fair day’s pay, ask his employers.
They can’t speak highly enough of the man who headed for the hills as a 17-year-old to begin a career as a high country musterer. They call him “a legend”.
That was decades ago, more decades than Arthur cares to count.
The years might have somehow ticked by, but time has done nothing to dull his energy or his enthusiasm for rural life. He’s a stockman through and through and can’t see any reason why he should hang up his boots and raincoat or retire his dogs. . .

Eastern promise for beef & lamb:

NEW ZEALAND’S sheep and beef farmers are set to reap the benefits of booming trade and tumbling tariffs on exports to China, says Beef + Lamb New Zealand.

Already, the China FTA is delivering annual tariff savings of nearly $25 million a year on sheep and beef exports of nearly $700m in 2010.

“Those volumes are trending upwards as China continues to develop rapidly, with a growing middle class population looking to increase protein consumption, and that includes our beef and lamb,” says BLNZ chief executive Scott Champion . . .

Fonterra, farmers blame retailers – Andrea Fox:

Fonterra farmers, fed up with being blamed for high milk prices, have turned the heat up on retailers, saying it’s time they explained their part in price setting.

The Fonterra Shareholders Council, which represents the interests of the big company’s 10,500 farmer owners, has urged Kiwis to consider the facts and figures around wholesale and retail milk prices.

Chairman Simon Couper said it will be clear neither farmers nor Fonterra are profiteering.

“Retailers owe New Zealanders a fair description of their part in taking wholesale priced milk to the consumer,” he said.

Dairy industry figures show the wholesale price of a litre of house brand milk in New Zealand is $1.11 . . .

Survey highlights effect of salmonella on sheep population –  Mary Witsey:

The preliminary results of the Southland Salmonella Brandenburg survey confirm the impact the infectious disease is having on the province’s sheep population.

Fifty-five Southland sheep farmers responded to the VetSouth survey, with almost one-third saying that their stock had been affected by the disease last season.

Thirty-eight per cent said their animals had suffered abortions last season, with 29 per cent attributing those losses to Salmonella Brandenburg . . .

Manager gets to know new patch – Mary Witsey:

Fonterra’s newly appointed Western Southland area manager is looking forward to meeting the dairy farmers in her patch.

Alana Tait has been on the road this month introducing herself to Fonterra suppliers around Western and Central Southland, as she settles into her new role.

No stranger to the district, she grew up in Central Southland and worked in the rural banking sector, and as a fertiliser field consultant, after completing a degree at the University of Otago . . .

Farmers forced to ride out currency, export volitility – Owen Hembry:

Volatility is a fact of life for exporters, says Federated Farmers president Bruce Wills.

Farmers had been looking with increasing concern at a rampant kiwi currency but the world had changed a lot in the past week and the dollar was down, which was useful, Wills said.

“I’m guessing we’re probably going to see commodity prices come back as well because the economies that we sell into are obviously now suffering some sort of contagion that they haven’t previously felt,” he said . . .

British heir sells off chunk of farm – Martin van Beynen:

British banking heir David de Rothschild has made a small gain on the sale of his Hickory Bay farm on Banks Peninsula.

The eco-adventurer and author had big plans for the property, but few appear to have come to fruition before he sold most of the farm in April to Ashburton company Hickory Bay Farm Ltd, shareholders of which include dairy farmer Keith Townshend, his wife Rosemary and Rachel and Kristin Savage.

Townshend bought 382 hectares of the 442ha property for $3.2 million. De Rothschild has retained a 60ha block, which has remnants of native bush . . .

Taipei Bloggers Create A Buzz Around New Zealand Beef:

Taiwan’s tastemakers are helping to set a new consumer trend for pure and natural New Zealand beef.

The local blogosphere is abuzz with appetizing photos and recipes singing the praises of our product, hailing it as delicious and nutritious.

The blogs follow three cooking class-style workshops hosted by Beef + Lamb New Zealand in a Taipei culinary school.

The industry-good organization invited 96 of the city’s young foodies to come along and learn about grass-fed beef, and have a go at cooking it for themselves. . .


Champion CEO for Meat & Wool

September 3, 2008

Dr Scott Champion has been appointed CEO of Meat and Wool NZ.

He is MWNZ general manager for market access services and takes over as CEO at the end of the month.

MWNZ chair Mike Peterson said:

 

“Scott has significant knowledge and experience of industry issues and as the leader of the Market Access and Services team, he has shown us an energy for building important industry relationships that deliver benefits for sheep and beef farmers and the wider industry.

 

“Scott has led the development of our beef and sheep meat marketing programmes and the market access work that contributed to improved access for meat and wool products through the China Free Trade Agreement (FTA) plus the recently announced ASEAN-Australia New Zealand FTA.  This is alongside the range of technical issues work that helps protect our beef, and sheep meat trade and the wool industry.

“Scott has also led a re-focussing of our North Asia beef programmes which now clearly differentiate New Zealand grass-fed beef. He has helped facilitate the growth of commercial industry investment alongside Meat & Wool New Zealand through new joint venture programmes for lamb in North America and beef in North Asia.”

Before joining Meat & Wool New Zealand, Dr Champion was the Research Development and Product Innovation Manager for the New Zealand Merino Company, based in Christchurch. Prior to that he was a lecturer in animal production and related subjects at the School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia. Scott’s PhD thesis looked at sheep nutrition and its impact on wool growth.

 

Dr Champion said he was looking forward to the new role. “This is a time of significant change for the sector and while it’s pleasing to see stronger prices feeding back to farmers, we must use this window to generate better long-term returns for sheep and beef farmers.”

 

Dr Champion said he was committed to ensuring Meat & Wool New Zealand played its role in ensuring the sheep and beef sector contributed maximum value to the New Zealand economy.

 


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