Did you see the one about . . .

January 11, 2011

Efficiency over etiquette – Offsetting Behaviour on whether manners matter. He also points out the flaws in reatailers’ campaign to charge GST on mail order purchases under $400  from overseas in transaction costs and tax.

Chart of the day deadwood edition  – Dim Post on which opposition MPs get in the Herald how often.

Rejecting drivel in favour of thoughtful writing – Eye to the Long Run on words and phrases to avoid.

Amusing crime uound up – Anna Sandiford, Forensic Scientist at Sciblogs, whos crime can make you laugh.

Golf Sierra Lima: lessons learned –  Latitude 44 reflects on a gliding accident.

And if you click no other do click this: Apres nous, le deluge – Andrew Geddis on the first cabinet after the election which begins:

 Phil Goff (Prime Minister) (Sitting astride a Harley-Davidson whilst dressed in a leather jacket, motorcycle helmet and red-top gumboots, with a lamb carelessly tossed across his shoulder): If we could come to order, please. I think we might begin proceedings with a motion of thanks to the man who has made this day possible .. .


Did you see the one about . . .

February 23, 2010

Unemployment – Something Goes Here has a cracker cartoon from Garrick Tremain.

A rural joke – Quote Unquote on sounds you hear on most farms (Though not Rob’s father’s).

Warning food is a choking hazard – Opinionated Mummy on the danger of warnings against danger.

How I became a Science teacher from Alison Campbell at Sciblogs and on a similar theme: Career Day – Rivetting Kate Taylor on how she got into journalism.

So good I stole it – Adolf at No Minister  and Dos and don’ts for cuddle class – Kiwiblog  illustrates in-flight etiquette.

Come take my stuff – Roar Prawn warns that technology can tell too much.

Top 10 at 10 Interest.co.nz has some funny cartoons among the serious stuff.

How not to define social sciences at Anti Dismal  . 

Exaggerating the benefits of Community Education at The Visable Hand In Economics and apropos of this Really big numbers at Off Setting Behaviour.


NZ a square peg in round ETS hole

November 24, 2009

New Zealand’s problem is that we’re different.

Primary production and industries based on it are our bigeest export earners; almost all our forestry is from exotic species; we have relatively little heavy industry and the bulk of our power is already from renewable sources.

The Kyoto Protocol wasn’t designed for countries like us.

The heavy reliance on primary production is much more common in developing countries. But around half our emissions come from animals and there is little, short of reducing stock numbers, we can do to reduce them immediately. Research is being undertaken to reduce emissions from livestock but practical, affordable solutions may be years away.

The rules requiring new trees to be replanted where old ones were felled was aimed at protecting rain forests and indigenous species. It seems no-one considered that a clause aimed at protecting indigenous trees shouldn’t apply to exotic timber species in a country where they grow as well as they do here.

Our private vehicle ownership is high by world standards but that reflects our relatively small, widespread population which means that public transport is neither practical nor affordable in many places.

New Zealand is a square peg and we were ill served by the negotiators who tried to fit us into the round ETS hole.

I have a lot of confidence in Tim Groser who will be working on our behalf at the Copenhagen summit.

But I thought the whole thing was a dog’s breakfast from the start and my concerns are even greater now that there are questions over manipulation of climate change data.

Over at Sciblogs Aimee Witcroft raises the possibility the leaked emails have been doctored and points to a Guardian story  on the issue. It quotes Prof Bob Watson, the chief scientific advisor at Britain’s Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs who said,

“Evidence for climate change is irrefutable. The world’s leading scientists overwhelmingly agree what we’re experiencing is not down to natural variation.”

 Also at Sciblogs Gareth Renowden isn’t convinced by the leaked material.

For a contrary view see:  Ian Wishart,  Adolf at No Minister,  Roarprawn, Whaleoil,  Not PC, Poneke,  Mr Tips at NZ Conservative, Thoughts from 40 South, and Something Should Go Here  who says: 

I’ll say it a thousand times, climate change activism is about politics, not science.


Did you see the one about

November 21, 2009

Thought for the day – Quote Unquote has a new angle on paper, scissors, rock. Whilte you’re there you might enjoy NZ farmer letter of the year – an answer to the problem of travel perks.

Worlds apart – Progressive Turmoil on the differences in mobile phone use in different countries.

Chicken Fever hits parliament – Audrey Young spots a chook and comes up with some answers to the question of why the chicken crossed the road.

Spam journalism # 63 and Much ado about nothing – Macdoctor points out the difference between smaller increases and cuts.

Goff loses chess game to analogue computer – gonzo Freakpower gets satirical.

Work/life balance – it’s not about the pets – The Hand Mirror finds the paid/ unpaid work balance leaves little time for life.

Saving the minghty kauri Over the Fence on the fund to fight kauri die back.

Supply and demand or what? – Anti Dismal on what matters.

One thing to keep in mind – The Visible Hand on the real issues.

What’s in the water – Alison Campbell at Sciblogs on the dangers of water births.

Trickle down carbon sequestration – Daniel Collins at Sciblogs shows tree planting in the wrong place may compromise water supply.

Greens revealed as biggest spender in Mt Albert by-election – Liberation shows money doesn’t buy votes.

Berlin wall series:  Poland,  Czechoslovakia and Bulgeria , – by Liberty Scott.

Big Boys toys – Frenemy is truck spotting.


Big bangs

November 17, 2009

If you’re in to big bangs you might enjoy The Telgraph’s 15 most explosive videos.

It includes films of what happens when you dump barrels of sodium in a lake and liquid nitrogen in a swimming pool.

For those who appreciate beauty more than bangs, there’s also this one of a slow motion water balloon bursting:

Hat Tip: Alison Campbell at Sciblogs who has a cautionary tale about sodium down a loo.


Did you see the one about . . .

November 16, 2009

Oh the things I learn . . . BK Drinkwater disproves the wisdom of crowds.

Florence Nightingale was a statistician Alison Campbell at Sciblogs posts on how the pioneering nurse won her case with numbers.

Also at Sciblogs: Visual illusions, change blindness and autism – Grant Jacobs asks how much of what we see is really there?

Philanthrocapitalism: How giving can save the world Take Part reviews a book that shows money does good.

Kitten demand exceeds supply – The Visible Hand applies economic theory to the pet market.

Incentives Matter: football helmet file – Anti Dismal finds trying to make sport safer may make it more dangerous.

Pies, cutting etc – Progressive Turmoil compares the market performance of comapnies in Australia & New Zealand.

APN chicken out – Cactus Kate reveals media impotency by financial decree.

Gotcha! TRM funding cut – Whaleoil claims another scalp.

And a new (to me) blog: Southern Squall – a gale of views from the south.


Did you see the one about . . .

November 4, 2009

Probing the depths of snow – Daniel Collins at Sicblogs has some stunning photos from Temple Basin.

Didn’t we learn from 1989 – Liberty Scott

When inanimate objects attack – Opinionated Mummy profiles some perfectly rages.

Motel greenwash – Motella doesn’t want a sermon when he stays away.

Mary Wollstonecraft wept – In A Strange Land adds to my contention that the fashion industry is inherently misogynist.

One of these is not the same – Macdoctor sees signs of sense from a health boss.

The Church of Jones – Roarprawn spots another cult.

October public polls – Kiwiblog paints a pretty picture for those of us who like blue.

Another pet lamb bites the dust – RivettingKateTaylor on life and death and pet shows.

And I like cows because . . . ummm  Kismet Farm has one of those days.

A heavyweight conundrum – Frendmy compares Australia’s roads with ours.


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