Rural round-up

April 19, 2013

New Zealander joins World Farmers Organisation board:

Federated Farmers President, Bruce Wills, has been appointed to the World Farmers Organisation Board as its Oceania representative. This assures New Zealand a key voice on the peak body representing farmer organisations from over 50 countries.

“It has been a superb General-Assembly in Japan,” says Bruce Wills, Federated Farmers President, speaking from Niigata, Japan.

“Federated Farmers has helped to broker a breakthrough trade policy for the World Farmers Organisation. I need to acknowledge the high level policy work involving not only Federated Farmers’ staff but kindred organisations too. . .

Cracks appear between farmer groups – Allan Barber:

It hasn’t taken long for the cracks to appear in the ‘united farmers for change’ movement started by the Meat Industry Excellence group which held its first meeting in Gore a couple of weeks ago with a resoundingly successful response.

The next meeting organised by MIE will be held in Christchurch this Friday, but without Gerry Eckhoff who chaired the Gore meeting but has resigned over a disagreement with the strategy. Having said on the National programme the morning after the meeting that the new system and structure could be in place by next season at the beginning of October, he is now saying this is completely unrealistic. I told you so, Gerry! . .

Drought Declarations in March Dominate Rural Marketplace:

Summary

Data released today by the Real Estate Institute of NZ (“REINZ”) shows there were 21 fewer farm sales (-5.3%) for the three months ended March 2013 than for the three months ended March 2012. Overall, there were 376 farm sales in the three months to end of March 2013, compared with 379 farm sales in the three months to February 2013, a decrease of 3 sales (-0.8%). 1,433 farms were sold in the year to March 2013, 2.4% more than were sold in the year to March 2012.

The median price per hectare for all farms sold in the three months to March 2013 was $22,317; an 11.3% increase on the $20,056 recorded for three months ended March 2012. The median price per hectare increased by 1.7% compared to February.

The REINZ All Farm Price Index eased by 1.1% in the three months to March compared to the three months to February, from 2,939.42 to 2,907.18. Compared to March 2012 the REINZ All Farm Price Index fell by 7.2%. Further details on the REINZ All Farm Price Index are set out below. . .

Govt supports development of dairy women leaders:

Associate Minister for Primary Industries Jo Goodhew has announced that the Dairy Women’s Network has been approved for a Sustainable Farming Fund grant of $180,000 over three years.

“The Government is investing in the development of female leaders in dairying to ensure the sector is well-placed to face future challenges,” said Mrs Goodhew.

“The Dairy Women’s Network has a track record of linking up and empowering women in dairying.

“The Network has identified the need for leaders to drive reform in the dairy sector so that it’s meeting social and environmental footprint obligations without compromising overall productivity.” . . .

Dairy Women’s Network Chief Executive Resigns :

The Dairy Women’s Network has announced the resignation of chief executive Sarah Speight.
 
Backed by significant national and international dairy industry experience, Mrs Speight joined the Network in 2011 as the first full-time chief executive in its 15 year history.
 
For the past two years she has been commuting from her home in Tauranga to the Network’s Hamilton-based offices. Mrs Speight said that to take the Dairy Women’s Network to the next stage and do the role justice requires someone who is Waikato-based.
 
“Being in Tauranga and with significant family and community commitments has made me rethink my priorities. I have decided to resign from the role of chief executive to spend more time with my family in the immediate future.” . . .

Govt funding to help support eucalpyt forestry:

Associate Minister for Primary Industries Jo Goodhew has announced that two projects focusing on eucalypts have been approved for Sustainable Farming Fund grants.

“The Government is investing in the development of eucalypts as a foresting option,” said Mrs Goodhew.

“Eucalypts offer a useful planting option. They are an alternative landuse for dryland areas and produce a naturally durable timber product.”

A project being run by the NZ Dryland Forests Initiative to share information about how to effectively manage plantations of durable eucalypts in dryland areas will receive SFF funding of $216,000. . .

Change Of Directors On Fonterra Board:

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited announced today the appointment of a new Director, Simon Israel, following the retirement of Ralph Waters.

Chairman John Wilson said the Board welcomed Mr Israel, a Singaporean who has exceptional governance, consumer and wider Asian business experience.

“Simon is based in Singapore and has worked in Asia for many years. He has significant business credentials in Asia and in consumer and investment businesses. He will bring to the Board invaluable knowledge and insights as Fonterra pursues its business strategy, particularly with its emphasis on emerging markets,” said Mr Wilson. . .

Synlait Milk Launches its ISO 65 Accredited Dairy Farm Assurance System:

Synlait Milk launched its internationally accredited ISO 65 dairy farm assurance system called Lead With Pride to its 150 strong milk supply base today.

The only system of its kind in Australasia, Lead With Pride recognises and financially rewards certified milk suppliers for achieving dairy farming excellence.

“It is about demonstrating industry leadership in food safety and sustainability, and guarantees the integrity, safety and quality of pure natural milk produced on certified dairy farms .

“It enables our world leading health and nutrition customers to differentiate their products using Gold Plus or Gold Elite certified milk that has been sustainably produced,” says Synlait Milk CEO Dr John Penno. . .

Funding to help sustainable aquaculture porjects:

Five important projects focusing on aquaculture will benefit from the latest round of Sustainable Farming Fund grants, Minister for Primary Industries Nathan Guy has announced today.

“New Zealand seafood is a premium product and it’s great to see groups looking to improve their production and value by developing aquaculture,” says Mr Guy.

The projects with funding are:

  • Koura Aquaculture, by Wai-Koura South: $119,420
  • Farming Premium Salmon, by the Salmon Improvement Group: $600,000
  • Management of the GLM9 Greenlipped Mussel Spat Resource, by GML9 Advisory Group: $20,000
  • Tuna (Shortfin-eel) Aquaculture, by Te Ohu Tiaki o Rangitane Te Ika a Mauri Trust (MIO): $600,000
  • Aquaculture custom bacterial vaccines, by Aquaculture New Zealand: $115,686. . .

Easy lamb roast (hat tip: Whale Oil):


Rural round-up

March 20, 2013

Commercial Partnership Pays Dividends for New Zealand:

An AgResearch-developed wool dyeing technology that bridges the gap between high performance and haute couture is set to shine on a global stage thanks to a worldwide licensing deal.

The revolutionary textile dyeing process is now being commercialised by BGI Development. It enables wool to be dyed two colours at the same time, and graphics and images to be dyed into the fabric. There is no loss of the quality feel of the fabric and the images won’t deteriorate over time.

The technology enables designers to use high performance merino in creative ways never before possible, making merino an excellent choice for fashion active wear. . .

Dairying Women Want Greater ROI From Professional Advisors:

The Dairy Women’s Network will work with hundreds of dairying women across the country in April, helping them to increase the return on their investment on rural professional advice.

Dairy Women’s Network chief executive Sarah Speight said dairy farmers spend an average of $4,000 annually for advice from rural professionals (Reference, Ministry of Primary Industries, Farm Monitoring Report 2012 – Pastoral Monitoring: National Dairy) and the Network wants to help ensure this is money well spent.

“Dairying women and their partners want to get the best return possible on the money and time they are investing in rural professional advice. They want to see a demonstrable return on their operation’s bottom line – whether that’s in the short or long term – or it’s money down the drain. . .

Red meat farmers call for industry consolidation – Allan Barber:

Not for the first time, sheep and beef farmers have called for a single processing and marketing company representing 80% of the red meat industry.

At a meeting in Gore on Monday up to 1000 farmers from Southland and Otago, and as far away as HawkesBay voted overwhelmingly for a consolidated structure. The organisers now intend to promote the concept to other farmer groups throughout the country. But the industry has been down this route before without reaching a satisfactory conclusion. So what is different this time?

 In 2006 a group of South Island famers formed the Meat Industry Restructuring Group which called for a merger of the two big cooperatives, Alliance and Silver Fern Farms or PPCS as it then was. In 2008 Alliance Group led an attempt to reach agreement with those companies that made up approximately 80% of the industry which was seen as the minimum level required to achieve critical mass. . .

Drought-fuelled pests threaten winter feed crops:

As farmers across the country grapple with drought recovery plans and dry conditions, Ravensdown’s George Kerse Business Manager Agrochemicals is warning about the impact of insect pests on winter feed.

“As if the lack of moisture was not bad enough, the consistent extremely dry conditions mean insect pests are becoming a real issue for farmers.

The current dry conditions will have already reduced the amount of autumn-saved forage for winter feed, so specialist winter crops are becoming more important ensuring adequate feed for animals to prepare for next season. . .

Deteriorating Conditions Impacting On Farm Sales:

Summary

Data released today by the Real Estate Institute of NZ (“REINZ”) shows there were 28 more farm sales (+8.0%) for the three months ended February 2013 than for the three months ended February 2012. Overall, there were 379 farm sales in the three months to end of February 2013, compared with 399 farm sales in the three months to January 2013, a decrease of 20 sales (-5.0%). 1,445 farms were sold in the year to February 2013, 11.6% more than were sold in the year to February 2012.

The median price per hectare for all farms sold in the three months to February 2013 was $21,951; a 1.43% increase on the $21,641 recorded for three months ended February 2012. The median price per hectare decreased by 8.5% compared to January. . .

NZ Honey Not Always What It Seems: Airborne Honey Urges Kiwis to Buy Fully Traceable Food:

Airborne Honey, New Zealand’s longest standing honey brand, is calling on New Zealanders to be sure that the honey they are buying is what it claims to be and of a sufficiently high standard. According to Airborne Honey data, a large amount of honey on the shelves is heat damaged and labelled inaccurately. This includes Clover and Manuka honeys coming in well under the pollen percentage recommended by published research and derived from applying the Codex international standard for honey.

“The horsemeat scandal in Europe is encouraging more people than ever before to make food choices based on traceability and assured quality. Unfortunately, many don’t realise that there can be such discrepancies when it comes to honey,” says Peter Bray, Managing Director of Airborne Honey. . .

Mobile technology is a game changer for primary industries:

Back in 1990 few people had personal computers, the internet was an unknown and the age of the mobile phones was just around the corner. In a very short space of time these three technologies have fundamentally changed the face of business around the world.

Many of today’s leading global companies, Google, Apple and Microsoft, built their business around these three technologies. The services they provided their customers had a dramatic effect on workers’ productivity and levelled the playing field for many small businesses.

The recent release of smartphones has also been a game changer for many. Businesses now take it for granted that emails can be checked, news read, documents signed or video streamed, all while on the morning commute to work. . .

Babich Wins Trophy for ‘New Zealand Wine Producer of the Year 2013’ in China:

Babich Wines has continued their run of impressive international accolades by winning the Trophy for ‘New Zealand Wine Producer of the Year 2013’ at the China Wine & Spirits Awards Best Value 2013 held in Hong Kong earlier this month.

The Babich Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2012 and Babich The Patriarch 2010 both won a Double Gold Medal. These medals, along with a Silver Medal for the Babich Black Label Sauvignon Blanc 2012 helped clinch the ‘New Zealand Wine Producer of the Year 2013’ trophy. . .


Rural round-up

December 5, 2012

TPP: Australia and New Zealand Agricultural Bodies Call For Action On Trade:

The peak agricultural bodies of New Zealand and Australia have united in calling for a truly comprehensive and generally liberalising Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement from day one of implementation.

Federated Farmers of New Zealand and the National Farmers’ Federation of Australia are both participating in the TPP negotiations, currently taking place in Auckland.

“Liberalisation must result in the elimination of all agricultural and food product tariffs and reform non-tariff measures,” says Bruce Wills, President of Federated Farmers of New Zealand. . .

NZ commodity prices post fourth month of gains, rising 1%:

New Zealand commodity prices rose for a fourth straight month in November, led by pelts, beef and wood pulp. Lamb prices fell to a 31-month low.

The ANZ Commodity Price Index rose 1 percent last month with 10 commodity prices gaining, four declining and three unchanged.

A firmer New Zealand dollar meant the gain in the ANZ NZD Commodity price Index was a slightly lower 0.9 percent. . .

Biological agriculture ‘joins the dots’ for farmers wanting more:

Listening to world renowned expert Arden Andersen talk on biological growing practices has helped many New Zealand farmers and growers “join the dots” to discover ways to grow healthier produce as well as improving their bottom lines.

American Dr Andersen will be back in New Zealand early in the New Year on a four-course speaking tour; two focusing on soils being held in Ashburton and Taupo, and two on human health in Havelock North and Auckland.

For John Kamp, a sheep, beef and dairy farmer in Mangleton, Hawke’s Bay, says attending the soils course not once but twice, has helped him totally change his farming approach for the 700 hectares he has direct control over. As a syndicate shareholder he has also influenced three South Island dairy farms to become biologically managed. . .

Delegat’s sees small lift in annual earnings, warns on strong currency:

Delegat’s Group is flagging a small increase in annual earnings for 2013, though it’s warning that the strong kiwi dollar is making life hard for the wine-maker.

The company forecasts operating profit of $27 million in the 12 months ending June 30, 2013, managing director Jim Delegat told shareholders in Auckland. That’s a 6 percent lift in earnings from 2012. The winemaker sees a 6 percent sales growth in 2013 to 1.97 million cases expected to sell at $119.10 a case.

“The group continues to actively manage its currency exposure, however currency movements have the potential to impact on earnings,” Delegat said. “With strong and sustainable competitive advantages in brands, distribution, supply and quality, the group is well-positioned to achieve its sales forecasts in the years ahead.” . . .

Agricultural R&D – a fantastic legacy and a means to move forward – Pasture Harmonies:

New Zealand, and its agriculture (systems) owes a heck of a lot to the billions of dollars poured into its research and development over the past 120 years.

Our wealth has, literally, been built on sunshine, soil and fresh air – and more importantly applied brains figuring out how to convert pastoral production into protein. (Actually, and to be fair, it is sunshine, soil and water – but that doesn’t work quite as well from a poetic or story POV).

For nearly a century, the ever refined pastoral method (essentially graze pasture, rest it, graze, rest…) has evolved to a quite elegant recipe. . .

Synlait posts $6.3M maiden profit, likely to seek more capital:

Powdered dairy products exporter Synlait Milk has turned in a maiden profit of $6.3 million for the year to July 31 and expects to seek fresh capital from its two shareholders as it pursues “further strongly profitable opportunities.”

The Dunsandel-based processor added a further 20 supplier farms during the year and processed a total of 498 million litres of milk in the year, compared with 343 million litres the year before, after adding a third drying unit, allowing it to manufacture higher-value nutritional products.

After failing to attract New Zealand investors to a $150 million initial public offering in 2009, Synlait Milk is now 51 percent-owned by the Chinese firm Bright Dairy, with the remainder held by Synlait Ltd, a vehicle representing the company’s founders. . .

Nominations close 16 December for top dairying woman award:

Women working in the dairy industry are being urged to get their nominations in for the 2013 Dairy Woman of the Year award, which closes for entry on 16 December 2012.

Sponsored by Fonterra, the prestigious award includes the chance to attend the year-long Women in Leadership course run by Global Women, worth $25,000.

Dairy Women’s Network chief executive Sarah Speight said the Dairy Woman of the Year award celebrates and advances women who are making a real difference in the dairy industry, in their dairying businesses and in their communities. . .

And from the Nutters Club:
Genius


Rural round-up

October 24, 2012

For want of a name our agriculture flounders – Peter Kerr:

Every story has a name – except the one which describes our agriculture.

This, I argue, is one of the reasons we struggle to tell people around the world and in our cities about what exactly is and has been the basis of our farming’s comparative advantage for the past 130 years.

Let me provide an example.

We don’t start a story with: ‘This is about a wolf and a little girl and a grandmother who lives alone.”

No, we start, “This is the story of Little Red Riding Hood.” . . .

MPI’s Farm Monitoring Report forecasts income drops for diary and sheep and beef; Allan Barber:

MPI’s 2012 pastoral farm analyses, taken from the Farm Monitoring Report, show significant falls in income predicted for dairy, and sheep and beef, and an increase for deer farming.

The reports show typical income patterns based on information gathered from a representative sample of farm properties.

The 2011/12 year was profitable because of favourable growing conditions which saw a 10% lift in dairy production offset the lower payout, while higher prices for sheepmeat combined with better farm productivity generated an 18% increase in cash profit. Deer farmers are enjoying a period of price stability and good productivity. . .

Dairying women push through broadband challenge to access online training:

A professional dairy industry women’s group will deliver an online training programme despite limited access to high-speed internet services in many rural communities.

The Dairy Women’s Network is the premier forum for women working in New Zealand’s dairy industry. With more than 3100 members, it works to develop the leadership and business skills of women in a changing agribusiness environment. It does this by providing a range of training and networking resources.

Chief executive Sarah Speight said that as dairy women’s lives were getting busier, the Network needed be innovative in how it delivered training to allow members to participate without having to be in a specific place at a specific time. . .

Pax Fonterra, Pax:

Federated Farmers is counselling Fonterra Co-operative Group’s Board that now is not the time to start examining the cooperative’s governance arrangements.

“For once it would be great to have some peace within Fonterra,” observed Willy Leferink, Federated Farmers Dairy Chairperson.

“We want Fonterra’s chairman-elect, John Wilson, given time at the helm to show shareholders what he is made of. Fonterra must also bed-in Trading Among Farmers (TAF), so now is not the time to get ahead of itself. . .

And:


Rural round-up

May 22, 2011

DWN appoints new CEO – dairy Women’s Network chair Michelle Wilson announces:

Sarah Speight has been appointed as full time CEO for DWN, and will commence her role as CEO on 13 June 2011.

Sarah comes to DWN with a wealth of knowledge having been involved in the dairy industry since finishing university in 1992. . .

Organic agriculture aint the answer – Tim Worstall posts:

Not to any reasonable question it ain’t.

Take the case of farming suitable for a world with climate change. And let’s just agree with the IPCC here. It’s happening, we’re causing it, something must be done.

Let’s also take their predictions of what will be the effects. Warmer, wetter winters, hotter, drier summers. . .

Preparer les terrains de l’avinir – perpare the land for the future – Pasture to Profit posts:

“Preparer Les Terrains de L’Avenir”. My French friends will be amazed with my command of the french language but this is a very appropriate title for this week’s blog.
“Prepare the earth for the future” is the core element of a Sustainable Farming system. . .

Beef demand shows seasonal uptake in US at last – Tony Chaston writes:

Much of the demand for beef in the US is driven by the barbeque season and traditional holidays that allow consumers to enjoy this way of eating. After a slow wet spring, things have warmed up and demand is picking up again. Economic factors also influence, and the price of oil affects the household budget and can determine how much is left over for the higher priced cuts of beef.

NZ’s beef prospects and prices are heavily influenced by what happens in the US, with most of our manufacturing beef being consumed there. Our prime beef has many more outlets than that country alone, but US’s exporting power can influences our returns.

There’s money in manuka honey and trial aims to greatly increase it – Peter Kerr at Sciblogs:

There’s plenty of research on why manuka honey’s so useful from a medical and human health point of view.

Equally we understand bees pretty well.

The missing part of the puzzle, ironically, particularly as it is a plant that’s indigenous to New Zealand is how to best grow the native.

But a newly formed consortium, the Manuka Research Partnership (NZ) Ltd., along with well-known honey marketer Comvita Ltd., aims to change that.


%d bloggers like this: