Rural round-up

February 9, 2016

Southern Field Days: from humble beginnings to huge event – Brittany Pickett:

From humble beginnings the Southern Field Days at Waimumu have transformed into the second largest in the country. Brittany Pickett set out to find out how Southland’s biennial agricultural magnet began and where it goes to next.

Some have dubbed it the “friendly field days”, a more laid-back version of the National Field Days, but behind the scenes Southern Field Days is anything but laid-back.

Like most events, the Southern Field Days began with an idea; hold an ag-focused event for Southland farmers which was farm-related and had a technical agricultural focus. . . 

Subsidies stall recovery – Neal Wallace:

Subsidies for European and United States farmers, that could be stalling the much-anticipated recovery in global dairy prices, are now being investigated by the New Zealand dairy industry.  

The subsidies were mostly linked to environmental protection rather than milk production but special agricultural trade envoy Mike Petersen and Dairy Companies Association chief executive Kimberly Crewther both believed the payments were shielding farmers from market reality.

“If price signals are masked for European farmers it could mean a delayed response to the dairy price cycle,” Crewther said. . .

‘People Lift’ having an effect – Sally Rae:

During challenging times such as those the dairy industry is now experiencing, being efficient on-farm is crucial.

So for Waipahi farm manager James Matheson, being involved in People Lift has been a beneficial experience.

The initiative, which is being trialled in the Waikato and Southland, has been created by DairyNZ. . . 

Training for Farmstrong cycling tour – Sally Rae:

A cycle seat is not the sort of saddle that Olivia Ross is ordinarily accustomed to.

But Miss Ross (27), a keen equestrian rider and barrel racer, has been enjoying a change of horsepower.

As Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s southern South Island extension manager, a keen Young Farmer, and supporter of all things rural, she has embraced Farmstrong, an initiative launched in June last year to promote wellbeing for farmers. . . 

Big traders forced to rethink –

A World Trade Organisation ban on agricultural export subsidies was more important for its signals on where global trade negotiations could go next than the ban itself, former top trade negotiator Crawford Falconer says.  

Fonterra immediately hailed a “watershed moment for global trade” with the removal of what it described as the “most damaging” subsidy available to governments wanting to support their farmers.  

The description of the subsidies – undoubtedly a drag on world dairy prices in the 1980s and 90s but not used for the best part of a decade – raised eyebrows among some local trade-watchers. . .

Historic Otago coastal property up for sale – Brooke Hobson:

Another piece of New Zealand paradise is up for sale, this time at the other end of the South Island.

Nature Wonders, a privately owned 172-hectare property at Taiaroa Head on Otago Peninsula is on the market as of today.

It comes after Awaroa Inlet in the Able Tasman National Park was listed for sale and a Givealittle campaign started for Kiwis to buy a piece of the property and gift it the Department of Conservation to oversee. . . 

Duck eggs hatch into growing business for Taranaki couple – Christpher Reive:

Forget chickens, duck eggs are the next big thing.

After doing their research about the health benefits of the duck eggs, Taranaki couple Dawn and have started to make a living out of making people, including themselves, healthier. 

“It’s not just about us and the ducks, it’s about helping people,” Dawn said. . . 

Hilux New Zealand Rural Games

Nathan Guy the Minister for Primary Industries and Steve Holland founder of the ‪#‎hilux‬ ‪#‎ruralgames‬ finding a good moist cowpat to throw.

Hilux New Zealand Rural Games's photo.

TVNZ coverage of the games is here  and Newshub’s report is here with the Minister trying cow-pat throwing and saying: “Sometimes we dish it out, sometimes we receive it.”

Hilux New Zealand Rural Games

Who will be judged Outstanding Rural Sports Competitor at this year’s Games and win the Grumpy Graham Trophy? Here’s Games founder Steve Hollander with Mitre 10 New Zealand‘s Stan Scott who made the shield in memory of our founding patron Neil ‘Grumpy’ Graham.
Hilux New Zealand Rural Games's photo.


Rural round-up

February 3, 2016

Booklet kicks off Fonterra structure review – Hugh Stringleman:

Fonterra’s farmer-shareholders have received a preliminary booklet on the co-operative’s governance and representation, raising many questions but not providing answers.  

It begins a five-month journey to a revised structure more appropriate for Fonterra’s size, complexity and global ambitions.  Farmer-shareholders will be expected to contribute to the review and vote on the final proposal in May. . . 

Rabobank announces new head of Food & Agri Research:

Rabobank Australia & New Zealand Group has announced the appointment of Tim Hunt as new General Manager of its Food & Agribusiness Research (FAR) division.

Mr Hunt takes on the role after five years with Rabobank in New York, where he served in the international position of Global Strategist – Dairy.

In his new role, Mr Hunt will lead Rabobank’s highly-regarded food and agri commodities research team – comprising 10 specialist analysts – in New Zealand and Australia. . . 

Alliance drafter has eye for winner – Sally Rae:

Warwick Howie received a little good-natured ribbing when he won the Paddock to Plate competition at the recent Otago-Taieri A&P Show.

Mr Howie, a drafter for Alliance Group, laughed that he had ‘‘copped a bit of flak” following the victory.

The competition, which attracted 41 entries, has become an annual fixture at the show, with proceeds going to the A&P Society. . . 

Course already tidy for Legends – Sally Rae,

When it comes to maintaining the Tokarahi golf course, greenkeeper Marty McCone has the same philosophy as for his farm – he likes it tidy all the time.

So preparing for this month’s PGA Legends Tour, which is returning to Tokarahi for the second year, did not require an extraordinarily massive effort.

‘‘I try and keep the course up to speed all the time. There’s a lot of little things you do to have it really tip-top,” Mr McCone said. . . 

Synlait revises milk price forecast to $4.20:

Synlait Milk has revised its forecast milk price for the 2015 / 2016 season from $5.00 per kgMS[1] to $4.20 per kgMS.

Chairman Graeme Milne said the revision is driven by the sustained low global commodity prices since September 2015, and a view that the recovery will be slower than anticipated.

“Our previous forecast of $5.00 kgMS expected prices to recover somewhat by this stage in the season, however this hasn’t happened and our revised forecast reflects this,” said Mr Milne. . . 

World Wetlands Day celebrated:

World Wetlands Day is a chance for New Zealanders to find out more about some of the country’s most important natural treasures, Conservation Minister Maggie Barry and Associate Conservation Minister Nicky Wagner say.

To mark the day the Department of Conservation has released a new online resource,Our Estuaries, to help people explore and look after the wetland environment.

“New Zealand has more than 300 estuaries, and they are home to a wide range of native plants, fish and birds,” Ms Barry says. . . 

Rethink needed over dairy farm planting incentives:

The cost and benefits of planting trees to help mitigate environmental effects of dairy farming need to be shared by us all for it to succeed, a new study says.

Evaluation of an agri-environmental program for developing woody green infrastructure within pastoral dairy landscapes: A New Zealand case study says Government incentive programs are ineffective in overcoming barriers to planting such as the higher cost and slow growth of native plants, and the perception of planting being of little direct benefit to farmers’ operations.

Lead author, Lincoln University Landscape Ecology Senior Lecturer, Dr Wendy McWilliam, says the Government and the dairy industry need to work closely together to develop and maintain a landscape-scaled woody vegetation network on both private and public land. . .

Forestry show NZ way to better safety:

A sharp drop in forestry deaths and serious injuries after a massive safety overhaul in 2014 shows what can be achieved when an industry joins together to make improvements, the Business Leaders’ Health and Safety Forum says.

The fall is welcome and sets an example for other industries to follow, says Forum Executive Director Francois Barton.

“Forestry has shown us some of the things that need to be done to bring down high fatality and serious injury rates in an industry,” Francois says. . . 

Good Progress – But More Work to Do to Make Forestry Safe:

A reduction in deaths and serious injuries in forestry since 2013 is encouraging but there is more work to be done yet, the Forest Industry Safety Council (FISC) says.

WorkSafe figures show serious injuries halved to 78 in 2015 from 160 in 2013, FISC National Safety Director Fiona Ewing says.

“The trend is going in the right direction but we can’t rest on our laurels. Three forestry workers died in 2015. That’s well down on the 10 who died in 2013 but it’s up from just one in 2014.. . .

Irrigation scheme loan approved:

An $8 million loan from the Selwyn District Council means design of stage two of a multi-million dollar irrigation scheme can go ahead.

The council approved the loan to Central Plains Water last month, with the money expected to transfer over next week.

But a community group told RNZ News rate payers should not be lending money to fund a private shareholder scheme. . .

Ruataniwha Dam: Investor mix still being finalised:

Hawke’s Bay Regional Council’s investment company (HBRIC) says work on getting farmers to sign up to buy water from the proposed Ruataniwha Dam is on hold until the project’s investor mix becomes clearer.

HBRIC has been looking for institutional investors to put money into the dam since Trustpower and Ngai Tahu pulled out in early 2014, saying the risks surrounding the dam were too high and the returns too low.

The company said it had countersigned contracts for 31 million cubic metres of water with a minimum of 45 million cubic metres needed to be sold to make construction financially viable.

It said finalising the investor mix for the Ruataniwha Dam was its current focus. . . 

Global slump in fert prices benefits NZ farmers:

New Zealand farmers stand to benefit from significant savings on their farm nutrient inputs with Ballance Agri-Nutrients’ latest round of price reductions, effective 31 January.

The price review sees urea drop $50 to $525, DAP reduce $25 per tonne, sulphate of ammonia by $15 and potash by $10. These changes will flow through to product blends.

Ballance CEO Mark Wynne says the move comes on the back of a global slump in fertiliser prices, driven by strong supply and soft demand. . . 

Lowest urea price since 2007:

Farmers stand to benefit from a $50 per tonne saving for urea from 1st February, when Ravensdown will drop its prices.

Chief Executive Greg Campbell says he is pleased that Ravensdown is again leading on a price reduction for farmers who are facing increasing costs in many aspects of their business whilst their returns are under pressure.

“We said it not long ago, with our recent superphosphate cap,” Greg says, “that we are about delivering all-year value to our shareholders, and we’re demonstrating it again with urea and other products.” . . 


Rural round-up

January 29, 2016

Hard to see where sheepmeat solution will come from – Allan Barber:

Not surprisingly farmers are dissatisfied with the state of the sheepmeat market. The impact of drought has brought about a near 20% increase in the kill for the first quarter in a season where the full year lamb kill is forecast to be 1.7 million lambs below last year.

Consequently this season, already characterised by a falling schedule, will come to an early finish. Meat processors will need to manage their capacity and seasonal plant closures very carefully if they are to avoid incurring unwanted costs. From the farmers’ point of view, uneconomic prices for lambs are accompanied by a lack of killing space for ewes, of which there are plenty waiting for capacity to free up. . . 

Another tough season ahead for farmers:

DairyNZ chief executive Tim Mackle says the on-farm cash income of farmers from all milk production this season will be under $4 per kgMS as a result of today’s news from dairy co-operative Fonterra that it is dropping its forecast Farmgate Milk Price to $4.15 per kgMS.

“That’s because some extra Fonterra payments for this season are shifting forward out of the 2015/16 season into 2016/17. Very little was carried over from 2014/15.

“This will have ongoing effects on farmers’ cashflows, their business equity and their ability to keep managing debt. The reduced milk price announcement today means our industry is facing a reduction in dairy revenues by around $800 million. That means $67,000 less in cash revenue for the average farm producing 150,000 kgMS. . . 

Farm scarce wildlife to take profits from poachers – Stephen Franks:

Cheaper DNA identification could soon end lucrative illegal trading in protected New Zealand wildlife. All it needs are some careful law changes. Maori could once again routinely feast on (farmed) kereru, without risk to wild populations.

Current law prohibits buying and selling threatened species. That is meant to prevent profiting from poaching. Illegal supply to meet legal commercial demand could strip wild breeding populations. But the prohibitions perversely increase the scarcity value that makes poaching lucrative.

Now DNA technology can cheaply and quickly identify the family of individuals in a population. It could tell which are descended from an authorised commercially bred line and which are from the wild population. . .

New Zealand wine exports reach record $1.5 billion high:

New Zealand wine exports have reached a new record high of $1.54 billion for the 2015 year, up 14% on 2014 according to New Zealand Winegrowers.

‘The new record level of wine exports is an outstanding achievement for New Zealand wine exporters and testifies to the strong global demand for our wines,’ said Philip Gregan, CEO of New Zealand Winegrowers.

New Zealand wine is exported to more than 90 countries, and is New Zealand’s 6th largest export good. . . 

Man plans tractor trek after wife’s death:

Ten vintage tractors will travel the length of New Zealand next month to raise awareness and money for Hospice New Zealand.

Auckland man Phil Aish came up with the idea after the death of his wife Janice 15 months ago.

The Tractor Trek will begin in Bluff on 22 February and end almost a month later on 18 March in Cape Reinga.

Mr Aish said some tractors had been bought in Southland and some were being freighted to Bluff before the big trip. . . 

Purple haze proves a hit – Sally Rae:

Blake Foster has contemplated putting a warning sign on State Highway 80 that reads ‘‘caution, purple distraction ahead”.

For visitors to the Mackenzie district can now stop and smell the lavender – all 99,000 or so plants of it.

Situated on the Mt Cook highway, New Zealand Alpine Lavender is the largest certified organic lavender farm in the southern hemisphere. . . 

Wool Eases Slightly:

New Zealand Wool Services International Limited’s C.E.O, Mr John Dawson reports that the combined North and South Island wool auctions saw targeted buying with some categories firm to slightly dearer and others marginally easier.

Of the 19,800 bales on offer 93.7 percent sold.

The weighted indicator for the main trading currencies remained similar to the last sale on 21th January, softening by 0.23 percent. . . 

Beef + Lamb New Zealand appoints new CEO:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand has appointed Sam McIvor as its new Chief Executive Officer. He will also have the role of CEO of the New Zealand Meat Board.

Beef + Lamb New Zealand Chairman James Parsons said McIvor is an experienced CEO who brings a range of strategic thinking and management experience to support both organisations’ work for sheep and beef farmers, and the broader sector.

McIvor is currently the Group General Manager Farm Operations at Ospri and he has held the roles of CEO Preston Corp Ltd and CEO of New Zealand Pork. . . 


Rural round-up

January 26, 2016

Westland Milk’s man-on-the-ground in China says the anxiety over China has been exaggerated – especially as it relates to their dairy appetite – Gregg Wafelbakker:

In recent weeks there has been a lot of negative media about economic conditions in China.

In particular the slowing growth, a volatile share market and a decrease in dairy imports.

The potential impact of much of this has been exaggerated. Given the value of China to Westland, indeed the whole of the New Zealand dairy industry,  it is important that we understand what is happening. . . 

Volume,not value, gets record red meat returns – Sally Rae:

Total red meat export revenue might have reached a record high in the first quarter of the 2015-16 meat export season, but average per-tonne values were down.

More shipments were responsible for the increased revenue in beef and veal, lamb and mutton, analysis by Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s Economic Service showed.

Beef and veal exports generated $682 million in the first quarter, up 14% compared with the same period last season. . . 

Comvita’s share price soars as more honey equals more money – Fiona Rotherham:

BusinessDesk) – Comvita, the manuka honey and health products maker, is riding the crest of a consumer push for health and wellness products with its share price having risen 124 percent in the past year.

The Te Puke-based company attributes the soaring share price to its improved financial performance and a big surge in demand for manuka honey products. Australia’s Capilano Honey and vitamin and health supplement company Blackmores have also seen their share prices go through the roof in the past year – 151 percent and 424 percent respectively, on the back of rising sales in China in particular.

Comvita now derives half of its revenue from China for its overall range, which includes products from manuka honey, olive leaf, and fish oil. . .

Economic terrorism, count the cost and weep – Gravedodger:

Lake Sumner.

Not many of us have been there, possibly most would not even know where it is.

Plenty of us have an image that fresh water in this bountiful country is under serious threat due to the massive growth in irrigation.

The East coast of the South Island has gazillions of acres of flat to rolling arable land that has for ever suffered summer dry that inhibits productive activity. . . 

Ashburton Zone Water Management Committee focuses on proposed land-use rules:

The Ashburton Water Management Zone Committee will meet for the first time this year on Tuesday 26 January to discuss how new land-use rules will affect local land-users.

The committee will receive a report from Environment Canterbury on the Nutrient Management and Waitaki Plan Change to the Canterbury Land and Water Regional Plan (LWRP).

The proposed Plan Change includes new region-wide nutrient management rules relating to land used for farming, and the zone committee will consider how it affects land-users in the Ashburton zone.

It requires land-users to implement Good Management Practices, and farming activities requiring resource consent will need Farm Environment Plans. The Plan Change also addresses phosphorus management and is expected to be notified for public consultation in February. . . 

A new food resolution for 2016:  Support family farmers! – Uptown Farms:

Statistics show that over 30% of all new year’s resolutions have to do with food – most often, eating less of it. Stats also indicate that by this time of year 1 out of 3 have already given up on those resolutions

So let me challenge you to a new kind of food resolution for 2016. Instead of just worrying about how much of it and what types of it you consume, I challenge you to also start caring about the people who are raising it – the family farmers. Below is a list of things you can do to support family farmers!

1. Stop determining the quality of farmer by the size of the farm! . . .

What farmers wish you knew about farmers – Pink Tractor:

From ‘farming is easy’ to ‘farmers are rich,’ there are a million things consumers think they know about farmers. We asked our amazing farm community what the one thing they wish people knew about farmers. These are the responses.

Farmers are smart! They have to be everything – plumbers, carpenters, mechanics, scientists, vets and more. Every day!

Farming is a lifestyle, not a job. It’s 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Every day of the year. It’s almost impossible to take a vacation, especially if you have animals. . .


Rural round-up

December 23, 2015

Proud to be NZ Farmers:

A  campaign designed to tell good news farming stories has caught the imagination of kiwi farmers attracting more than 1000 followers and reaching tens of thousands more in the first 24 hours since launch.  

The Proud to be NZ Farmers campaign, announced yesterday on The Farming Show by prominent beef and deer farmer, Shane McManaway, was kick-started with a Facebook page inviting anyone associated with New Zealand agriculture to share their positive news stories and talk about the pride they feel for their profession.  

Shane McManaway says the #ProudNZFarmers campaign is all about farmers coming out of their shells and showing the world the positive and passionate side of New Zealand farming.  . . 

Proud to be NZ Farmers's photo.
Solar innovation a relief for drought-stricken farmers:

A solar water pump system is helping get much needed water to stock on remote hill country farms and has captured international interest from water-stressed countries.

Central Hawke’s Bay electrical and pumping business Isaacs Pumping & Electrical has been developing the technology over the last two years with support from Callaghan Innovation.

Isaacs Electrical directors Gavin Streeter and Shane Heaton were continually being asked by farmers what options were available to reliably get water to stock without electricity, especially in remote hill country properties. . . .

Shareholder needs focus of manager – Sally Rae:

Nigel Jones is a strong believer in co-operatives.

Mr Jones, who joined Alliance Group as general manager strategy at the end of September, previously spent 16 years with Fonterra, where he had the same role in the ingredients division. Before that, he had an extensive career in internal logistics and supply chain.

Ever since he had been involved in co-operatives, he felt a sense of accountability to the shareholders.‘‘You recognise, in some cases, shareholders have got their entire family wealth entrusted to you,” he said. . . 

Beef and Lamb scientist takes genetics to farmers – Sally Rae:

One of the best parts of Annie O’Connell’s job is connecting with farmers.

Dr O’Connell is South Island extension officer for Beef and Lamb New Zealand Genetics, a position she took up in August.

Her Dunedin-based role focuses on helping commercial farmers and breeders apply genetics to their business objectives.

Beef and Lamb NZ Genetics was established in 2014 to consolidate sheep and beef genetics research and innovation. . . 

NZ export log prices jump to 9-month high on Chinese demand; slowdown looms – Tina M0rrison:

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand export log prices jumped to a nine-month high amid steady inventories and stronger demand from China, the country’s largest market.

The average wharf-gate price for New Zealand A-grade logs rose to $104 a tonne in December from $92 a tonne in November, marking the highest level since March, according to AgriHQ’s monthly survey of exporters, forest owners and sawmillers. The AgriHQ Log Price Indicator, which measures log prices weighted by grade, increased to 97.11 from 92.51, its highest level since February. . . 

MPI’s SOPI report suggests it is on different planet – Allan Barbeer:

When I read the headline forecast in the December update of the Situation and Outlook for Primary Industries report, my initial reaction was “they must be joking, what planet are they on?” After a slightly more in depth study of their analysis, I am still baffled.

Their prediction for the 2016 year appears to be based on two main premises: firstly product prices will be roughly maintained at present levels due to strong overseas demand and secondly the exchange rate will be 15% lower than at the time of the June update. These factors indicate an increase in export revenue of $1.9 billion, roughly half from red meat and the other half from forestry and horticulture. . . 

Beef + Lamb New Zealand Director Election in Central South Island:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand Western North Island Farmer Director Kirsten Bryant has been elected unopposed.

An election will be held in the Central South Island with candidates, John Gregan of Timaru and Bill Wright of Cave, being nominated for one Farmer Director position. . . 

Kiwifruit industry to benefit from new strategic alliance:

New corporate shareholders for Opotiki Packing and Coolstorage Limited (OPAC) provide the company with a strategic advantage in the growing Eastern Bay of Plenty kiwifruit industry.

Te Tumu Paeroa – the new Māori Trustee, and Quayside Holdings Limited (Quayside) – the investment arm of the Bay of Plenty Regional Council, will each own 10.1% of OPAC following agreement at a shareholders meeting yesterday.

The investment by each is part of an OPAC over-subscribed equity capital raising which totalled $4.85 million. . .

Proud to be NZ Farmers's photo.


Rural round-up

December 21, 2015

Peterson Farm Bros's photo.

Proactive approach succeeds – Sally Rae:

When it comes to grappling with water-quality issues, Madeline Hall has a suggestion for farmers.

They need to take a pro-active role to think about rules coming in and ask themselves how they could be involved to help make it work, Ms Hall, an environmental sociology masters student at the University of Otago’s Centre for Sustainability, said.

Ms Hall has researched the social impact of a nutrient-reduction nitrogen-trading scheme on farming communities in the Lake Taupo basin. The innovative market-based environmental policy was established to address growing community concern about water quality. . . .

‘Fearless leadership’ urged – Sally Rae:

When Dutch couple Helen and Art Blom came to New Zealand in the mid-1990s, it was to be only a temporary stint.

The couple, who had studied agriculture at university in Holland, intended to work on a farm for a year.

But they ended up ‘‘staying forever”, Mrs Blom, who recently graduated from the Agri-Women’s Development Trust’s 2015 Escalator programme, says, laughing. . . 

Summer vigil for biosecurity staff:

The latest border biosecurity boost will help the Ministry for Primary Industries manage a swarm of new international flights and passengers this summer.

Last week, 57 new biosecurity staff, including 24 detector dog teams, graduated from their training at a ceremony in Auckland.

MPI and other border agencies are gearing for the busiest summer ever, says Steve Gilbert, MPI’s Border Clearance Director. . . 

Pest control firm praises ‘exemplary’ 1080 investigation:

Animal Control Products (ACP), the State-Owned Enterprise that imports 1080 and manufactures 1080 bait products for pest control in New Zealand, today congratulated the Police on arresting and charging the blackmailer who threatened to contaminate infant formula with 1080 poison.

Chief executive William McCook said ACP was pleased to have been able to assist the Police with their investigation, in particular with some of the technical and historical aspects of their investigation.

He said the Police had done an exemplary job in tracking down and bringing the blackmailer to justice, and that the Ministry for Primary Industries’ (MPI) approach to protecting consumers and ensuring infant formula was safe was well-coordinated. . .

Upgraded Hooker Valley track opens:

A newly completed upgrade of Aoraki/Mt Cook National Park’s popular Hooker Valley track makes it easier for visitors to experience the spectacle of New Zealand’s highest mountains, Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says.
Ms Barry officially opened the improved track at a ceremony outside Mt Cook Village today.

The $1.7 million project means the track is less prone to flooding, avoids potential avalanche and rockfall areas and is more accessible for walkers. . .

AgriFoodNZ Setting Up To Invest in New Zealand’s Food & Beverage Sector

Signs Memorandum of Understanding with Bank of China NZ

The Bank of China (NZ) and AgriFoodNZ have today announced that they have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to help New Zealand food and beverage companies seeking to gain access to investment capital and expertise in marketing and distributing product and services in China.

AgriFoodNZ (Food & Agricultural Trading New Zealand Limited) was recently formed to facilitate investment and enhance the marketing and distribution capability of New Zealand food and beverage products.

Macri ditches wheat, corn, beef export taxes:

The [Argentinean] national government has finally announced one of its pledges during the campaign: the total removal of export taxes for regional economies and a cut of the soy bean export tax by 5%.

Soy bean export taxes will be reduced from 35 percent to 30 percent while corn, wheat and meat export taxes will be totally removed.

“The day has come and I had asked you to hold on,” Macri said during a speech delivered in the Buenos Aires city of Pergamino where he made the announcement, escorted by Buenos Aires governor María Eugenia Vidal, Agricultural Minister Ricardo Buryaile, Interior Minister Rogelio Frigeroi and Let’s Change Senators Carlos Reutemann and Alfredo de Angeli, among other officials.

He called to “launch a new phase together” adding “without the agricultural sector the country won’t move forward.” . . .

Student has made $40,000 profit selling baby formula to buyers in China – and says he is doing nothing wrong ‘because every child deserves access to the food’ –  Liam Quinn:

A student has revealed how he made more than $40,000 selling baby formula to China.

The young student, who did not reveal where he lives in Australia, said he got into the lucrative market after a Chinese friend returned to the country late in 2014.

Just weeks later, he was selling his first can and making a measly $1.50 profit, but it was the start of a huge pay-day. . .


Rural round-up

November 23, 2015

Enterprising Rural Women Award 2015 winners announced:

Joanne Taylor’s rural lifestyle magazine Latitude has won the supreme award at the Enterprising Rural Women Awards held in Nelson on Saturday 21 November.

“In the seven years of this competition we have seen vibrant rural businesses increasingly appeal to urban residents, tourists and the rural community. This has been reflected in the winning rural business woman : who has succeeded in pursuing her publishing dream, while also supporting New Zealand’s rural communities,” says Wendy McGowan, National President, Rural Women New Zealand.

Joanne Taylor was the NZ Post sponsored ‘Making it in Rural’ category winner; however, there were three other exceptional category winners: . . .

Thinking pink helps raise funds for hospice support – Sally Rae:

Tom Ballantine has been through a rough patch.

Not only did the Invercargill man lose his daughter, Paula Dempster, to cancer in December last year, but his wife, Lorraine, died in February this year, also succumbing to the disease.

”It’s been a really, really torrid time,” Mr Ballantine (71) said.

What has helped keep him occupied has been a fundraising initiative, selling pink singlets to those in the wool harvesting industry, with $2 from each sale going to boost hospice coffers. . . .

Trust head promotes wool with a passion – Sally Rae:

Wool is a fibre that ”easily ticks all the boxes”.

What now needed to happen was a concerted effort on getting that message out to discerning consumers, Campaign For Wool New Zealand Trust chairwoman Philippa Wright said.

Ms Wright, who is boss of Waipukurau-based woolbroker Wright Wool, has been involved with Campaign for Wool since its inception in 2010. . . 

JUSTICE for Mary Jane Veloso, JUSTICE for Filipino Dairy Workers in NZ and All Victims of Illegal Recruiters:

We applaud Indonesia’s moratorium on executions as we in the Filipino-Kiwi communities in New Zealand were among those who prayed and petitioned for the life of human trafficking victim Mary Jane Veloso. Mary Jane’s plight generated massive support from citizens around the globe. This young mother of two on the brink of execution on drug trafficking charges became the face of many other Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) on death row and those exploited by illegal recruiters and abusive employers. We hope that freedom and justice for Mary Jane will be the next good news.

In New Zealand, over 1000 Filipino migrant workers are now greatly distressed as they experience their lives hanging in the dairy farms. Last October, Immigration NZ arrested a dual Filipino/New Zealand national on fraud charges. This recruiter used false employer details and false documents on workers’ experience, asking huge fees from the applicants wanting to work in NZ. We hope Filipinos back home would be aware of this scam and be careful not to be victimised by recruiters who take advantage of their desperate need to find better jobs in NZ and elsewhere. . . 

NZ Farming's photo.


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