Rural round-up

January 10, 2017

Eradication helicopter pilot Peter Garden recognised for international work – Debbie Jamieson:

Wanaka man Peter Garden started his flying career as an agricultural pilot in Southland and went on to become one of the world’s pre-eminent eradication helicopter pilots.

The 70-year-old has been made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to aviation and conservation and said it was circumstances that led him to the work he is being recognised for. . . 

Let the fleeces fall fast – Sally Rae:

Nathan Stratford had been looking forward to sitting down and enjoying a beer over Christmas.

But a successful campaign on the shearing board at the Canterbury A and P Show in November ended that plan.

The Invercargill father-of-two edged out hot favourite Rowland Smith to nail the second spot in the New Zealand team for the world shearing and woolhandling championships.

Come next month, Stratford (42) will be pulling on his moccasins in front of a hometown crowd, albeit peppered with an international flavour, in the ILT Stadium Southland. . . 

The light between ordeals: From drought to storms – and an earthquake – Virginia Larson:

“I should hate this place by now, shouldn’t I? But I don’t. If anything, I’m even more excited about living here.” Doug Avery is on the phone from the family farm at Grassmere, 40km south of Blenheim. The line’s a bit crackly, but not Doug. “It’s the volcanoes and earthquakes and faultlines that have created this country. It’s what we love about it. And now, well, we’re making New Zealand great again!”

I’ve tracked down Doug because I figure if he’s given up after the November 14 Kaikoura quake, there’s no hope for any of us. We might as well hole up in our panic rooms and wait for the apocalypse. . . 

Kiwi are thriving – and so are kereru – Kate Guthrie:

The magnolias aren’t looking too good at Arthur Hinds’ place. His wife Diane used to complain about the damage possums were doing. But that’s not the problem nowadays.

The Department of Conservation dealt to the possums in 2000, just before the Whenuakite Kiwi Care Group started their predator control programme. Arthur joined the Kiwi Care Group early on and today Diane’s magnolias are the victims of the group’s success. Their buds are devastated by an exploding population of kereru. . . 

Actually, raising beef is good for the planet – Nicolette Hahn Niman:“The damage from the kereru is much worse,” says Arthur. “The possums ate the buds, but the kereru are killing the trees.”

People who advocate eating less beef often argue that producing it hurts the environment. Cattle, we are told, have an outsize ecological footprint: They guzzle water, trample plants and soils, and consume precious grains that should be nourishing hungry humans. Lately, critics have blamed bovine burps, flatulence and even breath for climate change.

As a longtime vegetarian and environmental lawyer, I once bought into these claims. But now, after more than a decade of living and working in the business—my husband, Bill, founded Niman Ranch but left the company in 2007, and we now have a grass-fed beef company—I’ve come to the opposite view. It isn’t just that the alarm over the environmental effects of beef are overstated. It’s that raising beef cattle, especially on grass, is an environmental gain for the planet. . .

An NFL player who has made $37 million spends 12 hours a day working on his family farm in the off-season – Cork Gaines:

Green Bay Packers wide receiver Jordy Nelson is in the second year of a four-year, $39 million contract and has already made $37 million in his career. But when the playoffs are over, he will return to his family farm in tiny Riley, Kansas, where every off-season he goes to put in a full day’s work.

In an interview for a recent issue of ESPN the Magazine, Nelson said he works up to 12 hours a day on the farm, driving a combine to cut wheat or rounding up the 1,000-cow herd in the town whose population is 992.

“Working cattle is my favourite farm duty,” Nelson told ESPN. He said he identifies “more as a farmer” than as a football player. . . 

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Farmer Nutrition Facts  % Daily value *:

Patience 200%  Common sense 200% Dedication 200%

Love of the land 300% Passion 200% Grit 200%

Sleep 50%

*Percentage daily values may vary depneding on the day.


Rural round-up

January 5, 2017

From backwater to water ‘battleground’ – Sally Rae:

Farming in the Omarama area these days is very much like farming in the proverbial fish-bowl.

The spotlight is on both the Upper Waitaki and neighbouring Mackenzie district with changing land-use, water quality and environmental issues to the fore.

Twenty years ago, Omarama barely registered on the map; rather it was ”somewhere to drive through at high speed” to get to Wanaka or Queenstown, sheep and beef farmer Richard Subtil, from Omarama Station, said.

Bellamy’s organic infant formula derails in China – Keith Woodford:

For the last two years, Bellamy’s organic infant formula out of Australia has been one of the two rising stars of the Chinese infant formula market. The other has been ‘a2 Platinum’ produced here in New Zealand by Synlait for The a2 Milk Company (ATM).

In recent weeks, the Bellamy’s business has run badly off the tracks. This has sent jitters more widely through the infant formula industry.

First, there was a cautious market guidance release by Bellamy’s on 2 December, and the Bellamy’s share price immediately crashed 40%. Then on 12 December, Bellamy’s asked that its shares be suspended from trade for 48 hours while they assessed their position. This suspension has subsequently been renewed twice and currently runs through to 13 January 2017 while further assessment occurs. . .

Dairy turmoil shows folly of narrow focus;

Farming does not get the public attention is deserves these days, until this time of year when any road journey out of the cities reveals what a wealth of beauty and prosperity the countryside contains. Many farms somehow managed to look prosperous to the urban eye even when the main industry of most – dairying – was in the doldrums. But at least this summer, city holidaymakers on the roads can look at those verdant pastures and know that this, at last, is a happy new year for rural New Zealand too.

After two years of depressed dairy prices, the market began to turn in the middle of last year and for the past few months the price of milk powder has been back above break-even levels for most producers. Furthermore, there is every reason to believe the slump is over. The over-supply that caused it, largely from Europe, has been reduced or consumed and this season’s supply better matches demand.

The end of the world as we know it: What a vegan New Zealand would look like. – Jon Morgan:

Over Christmas lunch an earnest young niece asked, what did I have against vegans. I replied, nothing.

A couple of people I know profess to be vegans, migrating there from simple vegetarianism. They have to go to great lengths to ensure they have a balanced diet and I worry for their children, but otherwise they’re perfectly likable.

It’s the militant vegans I can’t stand, I told her. They’re the ones who have made veganism into a nefarious political movement, with the closure of all animal farms as their primary goal. . .

Rustlers take 1400 lambs in massive stock heist:

A Whanganui farmer has lost 1400 lambs to rustlers in what might be the largest stock heist in the country.

Police say they received a complaint about the theft from an owner of a property near Fordell.

More than 1400 lambs, worth about $120,000, reportedly went missing between October 25 and November 7, this year.

“That could be one of the biggest thefts involving sheep in the country,” Harry Matthews, president of Whanganui Federated Farmers, said. . . 

Texus Fibre eyes $2.9b face mask market in Asia :

A Kiwi company has secured a deal it hopes will unlock a lucrative $2.9 billion Asian healthcare market.

Texus Fibre uses natural wool to develop ‘functional materials’ – meaning they do something clever scientifically.

On Thursday it announced an investment and distribution deal with Auckland firm Healthy Breath Limited (HBL) for Texus’ wool-based air filter to be used in face masks marketed to city-dwellers in Asia. . .

 


Rural round-up

December 20, 2016

Merino at heart of firm’s special textiles – Sally Rae:

Global Merino truly lives up to its name.

In August, the company’s founder and chief executive Jose Fernandez and his family moved from the United States to Spain.

The company itself remains based in California, there is an office in Bangkok, its technical director is in Melbourne and much of its merino wool is sourced from New Zealand.

Global Merino is a technical textile manufacturer, founded by Mr Fernandez in 2007, which uses merino wool as a primary ingredient and in a variety of ways. . . 

Livestock learning experience – Sally Rae:

A long day in the sheep yards weaning lambs might not be everyone’s idea of fun  but Scottish teen Jessica England reckons she is living the dream.

Miss England (18), who left school this year, is having a gap experience in New Zealand working on farms.

Her family has a strong connection with New Zealand. She is the great-granddaughter of James Galloway who, with his father Robert, founded the J. W. Galloway business. . . 

Central Otago win tourism growing – Yvonne O’Hhara:

Central Otago is seeing an increase in wine tourism as more tourists wend their way around the region’s cellar doors.

Tourism Central Otago and Central Otago Winegrowers manager Glenys Coughlan said as a result many of the area’s wineries were investing in additional facilities to take advantage of the growth.

”We have certainly seen an increase in interest and investment in wine tourism and I would estimate several million dollars [going] into new and improved facilities in recent times,” Ms Coughlan said. . . 

Up to 40 wasp nests per hectare in Nelson, ecologist says:

A new campaign is under way to combat the heavy wasp population in Nelson-Tasman.

Victoria University insect ecologist Phil Lester said the region, home to honeydew beech forests, has one of the greatest wasp densities in the world, with up to 40 nests per hectare.

A community-led project, which started this week, has been encouraging locals to sign up to put down bait stations containing a wasp poison, Vespex. . . 

Ryan looks forward to challenges :

The New Zealand Farm Environment Trust’s new General Manager James Ryan is looking forward to the challenges the new job will bring.

Christchurch-based James Ryan, a former policy manager with DairyNZ, was appointed in October this year.

He says the Trust will play a crucial role in guiding farmers through an era of increasingly complex sustainability issues. . .

 

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Pay the farmer now or pay the doctor later.


Rural round-up

December 12, 2016

Alliance manager connected with land – Sally Rae:

Agriculture is in Heather Stacy’s veins, both personally and professionally.

Ms Stacy started work last month in the newly created role of general manager, livestock and shareholder services, at Alliance Group.

Brought up on a dairy farm in Gippsland, a major Australian dairy region east of Melbourne, she had always had a sense of adventure.

“Throughout my life and career, I’ve done a lot of different things,” she said. . . 

Driftwood puts sculptor in her happy place:

Meet Zeus, possibly the quietest stag in Otago.

He is also cheap to keep, does not require feeding and is proving quite a drawcard on his roadside location near Karitane.

Zeus is the creation of East Otago woman Sharon Cunningham, who has been making driftwood animals for several years.

She started with some small pieces, including a poodle, and then progressed to some larger pieces, including a pony, a pig and piglets and a dragon. ‘‘I’m a huge Game of Thrones fan so I had to make a dragon,’’ she said. . . .

Supply-driven global meat markets to put pressure on prices – Rabobank:

· High supply and competitive market expected to push down global meat prices

· China forecast to maintain record levels of pork imports into 2017

· More complex production market forecast, with pressure to mitigate threats including concerns over antibiotic use and greenhouse gases

· New Zealand beef production to remain restricted as a result of herd rebuilding. New Zealand lamb returns are being challenged by a strong currency, despite some improvement in export conditions in some markets. . . .

Lincoln University’s funding cut by $2.4m -John Gerritsen:

The Tertiary Education Commission cut $2.4 million from Lincoln University’s funding earlier this year, official documents reveal.

They show the commission decided the university’s Telford division should no longer be protected from enrolment drops by a funding guarantee introduced after the 2011 Canterbury earthquake.

The guarantee, or funding recovery exemption, ensured Canterbury universities and polytechnics were funded at their pre-quake enrolments even if they enrolled fewer students and it runs until the end of 2018.

The commission’s board removed the exemption from the Telford section “due to its significant under delivery and poor incentives”. . . 

New Chair for NZ Dairy Industry Awards:

The New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Trustees have chosen Woodville dairy, beef and cropping farmer Ben Allomes as Chair at a recent trust meeting.

Mr Allomes has been a DairyNZ director since 2010 and a supporter of the New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards since he and his wife first entered in 2002.

Mr Allomes and wife Nicky won the Hawkes Bay/Wairarapa Sharemilker of the Year title in 2008 and went on to win New Zealand Sharemilker of the Year. They still have the same sharemilking position they did then, plus an equity partnership, equating to 1300 cows. . . 

New Zealand orange roughy gest top  international sustainability tick:

New Zealand’s three largest orange roughy fisheries have been certified as meeting the international gold standard for sustainable fishing by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) (MSC release).

This achievement further demonstrates New Zealand’s commitment to sustainable fisheries management, Deepwater Group Chief Executive, George Clement says.

“This milestone achievement validates the seafood industry’s ongoing investment into sound, scientifically grounded fisheries management and our desire to have our main fisheries recognised as meeting the world’s most rigorous sustainablity standards,” he says. . . .

Orange roughy fisheries certified as sustainable:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has welcomed certification of several orange roughy fisheries by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC).

“This is a great success and recognition for a fishery that was in real trouble in the early 1990s,” says Mr Guy.

“A huge amount of work has gone into rebuilding this fishery over the years by industry and successive Governments. To now have it recognised as sustainable by an independent, international body is worth celebrating.” . . .

Potato industry further strengthen biosecurity partnership:

Potatoes New Zealand Inc. (PNZ) today signed an agreement with Government to better protect the potato industry it represents in managing biosecurity.

The industry group became the 14th partner organisation to join the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for Biosecurity Readiness and Response. The Deed was signed by representatives from PNZ at a ceremony held on a potato farm in Koputaroa. Attendees included PNZ and Government representatives, the Hon Nathan Guy – Minister for Primary Industries and the GIA Secretariat. . . 

Potato industry joins GIA biosecurity partnership:

The potato industry has become the thirteenth industry partner to join the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) biosecurity partnership, Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has announced today.

“It’s very pleasing to have Potatoes New Zealand working with the Ministry for Primary Industries and other industry partners on biosecurity,” says Mr Guy.

“It means we can work together on managing and responding to the most important risks like tomato- potato psyllid. . . 

Nominations open for Beef + Lamb New Zealand governance roles:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand is seeking nominations for two farmer director positions and a role on the organisation’s Independent Board Remuneration Committee.

In line with the Beef + Lamb New Zealand Constitution, two electoral district directors will retire by rotation at next year’s annual meeting and they are Andrew Morrison (Southern South Island) and George Tatham (Eastern North island). . . 

Maintaining peat performance – Bala Tikkisetty:

Proper management of peat soils in the Waikato region is a crucial issue for both the profitability of farming and environmental protection, particularly as we head into summer.

A highly productive resource peat soils are, however, a literally shrinking resource as they lose moisture. But the good news is that there are strategies farmers can use to protect them and mitigate the impacts of their use on the environment.

Waikato region has about half New Zealand’s peatlands, some 94,000 hectares containing 2.7 billion cubic metres of peat. . . 

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Rural round-up

December 6, 2016

Farm and research hub all go – Sally Rae:

Work is under way to convert the site of the new Southern Dairy Hub at Makarewa, near Invercargill, into a working dairy farm and centre for science and research.

Last week, Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce climbed aboard an excavator to shift  earth at the site of the new dairy shed.

DairyNZ and AgResearch  are the principal shareholders in the hub,  investing $5million each, while local farmers and businesses  have contributed a further $1.25million through the Southern Dairy Development Trust. . . 

McKay still entranced by cavalcade – Sally Rae:

When Jeanette McKay saddled up for the first Otago Goldfields Cavalcade in 1991, it was to prove to be an “epic journey”.

A blizzard hit the trail, resulting in nine people being treated for hypothermia, but it failed to dampen her enthusiasm for the event.

Mrs McKay (71), from Springvale, near Alexandra, is among a handful of equine enthusiasts who have taken part in every cavalcade. And she will be hitting the trail again for next year’s 25th anniversary event which finishes in Omakau on March 4. The event still maintained its “magic” for the cavalcade veteran who always hoped it would “enthuse people to do more trekking, to see more of the country”. . . .

Healthy Rivers Plan Needs a Rethink:

Federated Farmers is calling for the Healthy Rivers Wai Ora project in the Waikato to be put on hold.

This follows the Waikato Regional Council’s intention to withdraw 120,000 hectares from the original proposed Plan Change 1.

The decision was made after Hauraki iwi raised concerns around the consultation process.

As a result, an area of land of interest to iwi will be ‘partially withdrawn’ as a step towards future consultation with Hauraki iwi. . . 

Concrete for 50 years peace of mind – Mark Daniel:

As the milk price nuzzles $6/kgMS, dairy farmers with financial clout can again turn to dealing with effluent and some equipment makers can cease holding their breath.

One dairy farmer who has the effluent problem under control is John van Heuven, who with his wife Maria milks 500 cows on 165ha at Johmar Farms on the outskirts of Matamata.

Having decided to increase cow numbers and install a 54-bail rotary for 2015, van Heuven decided to upgrade effluent storage, which had capacity for 1.5 milkings and needed closer attention. . . 

NZ milk processors including Miraka lift forecast payouts, boosting economic outlook – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – Advances in whole milk powder prices at recent GlobalDairyTrade auctions is bolstering the outlook for New Zealand’s largest export commodity and prompting milk processors to hike their forecast payout levels to farmers this season, signalling a boost ahead for the local economy.

Taupo-based milk processor Miraka hiked its base forecast late last week to a range of $5.80-to-$6 per kilogram of milk solids, joining Open Country Dairy which raised its forecast to $5.60-to-$5.90/kgMS, Westland Milk Products with a range of $5.50-to-$5.90/kgMS, and both Synlait Milk and Fonterra Cooperative Group at $6/kgMS. Dairy NZ currently estimates the average farmer will break even at a milk price of $5.05/kgMS. . . 

Lamb flap prices rise to 20-month high as higher Chinese demand meets lower NZ supply – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – Prices for the humble lamb flap are on a tear, hitting their highest level in 20 months, driven by increased demand from China and lower supply from New Zealand.

While prices for a leg of lamb in the UK and beef for meat patties in the US are being impacted by weak demand, the price for lamb flaps rose to US$5.10 per kilogram in November, from US$4.70/kg in October and US$3.80/kg for the same period a year earlier, according to AgriHQ’s latest monthly sheep & beef report. That’s the highest level recorded by AgriHQ’s since March 2015. . . 

Major dairy farming portfolio placed on the market for sale:

One of New Zealand’s larger private-structured dairy farming operations – producing some $8.5 million worth of milk a year – has been placed on the market for sale.

The portfolio of Otago farms encompasses four stand-alone dairying operations located some 15 kilometres south-west of Oamaru. They are owned by Oamaru-based company Borst Holdings Ltd.

Combined, the 992 hectares of land produce a whopping 1,418,000 kilograms of milk solids annually from a herd of 3380 animals. The four operations within the portfolio are:
• Pleasant Creek Farm – a 321 hectare property split into 42 paddocks, milking 980 cows. The farm has five dwellings – including a five-bedroom executive style homestead, a four-bedroom manager’s residence, a second four- bedroom dwelling, and a trio of two-bedroom staff quarters in various configurations. . . 

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Rural round-up

December 5, 2016

First transport of milk in and out of Kaikoura today :

Milk tankers will be able to start using Kaikōura’s only access road from today.

Essential freight is also being given priority on the inland road, which is considered fragile and hazardous.

Transport Agency regional performance manager Pete Connors said about 240 vehicles would be driving north on the road this morning. . . 

Scholarship awarded – Sally Rae:

Olivia Ross lives by the mantra: “make the most of every day”.

Miss Ross (28), of Longridge North, near Balfour, is one of five young primary industry leaders to receive the inaugural ANZ Future Leaders scholarship.

Open to New Zealand Young Farmer members, the scholarship, worth up to $10,000, was designed to give future leaders in the primary sector a “step up” by providing them with financial support for their planned path of study or professional development. . . 

Tertiary training demand falls – Neal Wallace:

Primary sector productivity rates will remain stalled unless more people are trained and issues with training providers are addressed, DairyNZ strategy leader Mark Paine says.

Industry studies and the Productivity Commission had found primary sector productivity had plateaued and part of the answer to improve that was a strong, flexible training structure, Paine, who is responsible for strategy and investment for people and business, said.

Last week the Farmers Weekly revealed providers responsible for training about 1000 sub-degree trainees were closing or considering doing so. . .

The sale of all sales – Annette Scott:

A national shortage of store cattle and grass-derived demand pushed weaner calf prices to record levels at the last ever cattle sale at Tinwald.

As the hammer went down on the annual consignment of calves, the Ashburton IHC calf and rural scheme fundraiser hit the record books in more ways than one.

The organisation’s calf prices not only hit record highs but the cattle sale was also the last for Tinwald sale yards, destined for closure this month.

The wet weather failed to dampen bidders’ spirits. . . 

NZ taking world leadership role against invasive species:

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry today announced that New Zealand will take on a leadership role internationally, working with others to control and eradicate invasive alien species and protect native habitats.

The Minister has made the announcement at the International Convention on Biological Diversity which is currently meeting in Cancun, Mexico to consider the best way to meets targets to reduce the impact of invasive species on global biodiversity.

“New Zealand’s commitment to Predator Free 2050 is the largest and most ambitious invasive species eradication project ever attempted.  We are already seen as world leaders in pest control,” says Ms Barry. . . 

Going, going, gone :

PGG Wrightson senior auctioneer John McKone  sells a ram at the Merrydowns Romney and Southdown ram fair at Waikoikoi last week.

Blair and Sally Robertson sold 194 rams as far afield as Warkworth for an average price of $1130.

Romney rams ranged from $600 to $3800,  the top priced ram purchased by Peter and Diane Lowe from Ashburton, and Southdown rams sold from $450 to $3000. . . 

Gorse set to fire Chinese barbecues in win-win for for farmers and the environment – Carol Rääbus:

Take a drive along the Midland Highway through Tasmania and you will see hillsides covered in thousands of gorse plants.

The spikey evergreen has become a major problem for farmers and the state’s environment since it was introduced with the arrival of Europeans.

It tends to like the conditions down here,” John Boland from Gorse Power told Leon Compton on 936 ABC Hobart. . . .

IR8 – the miracle rice which saved millions of lives – Justin Rowlatt:

Last week I received a very unusual invitation indeed. It was to a 50th birthday party in a swanky Delhi hotel, but the party was for a plant: a strain of rice known only by its initials, IR8.

A celebration for an angry rice variety; who could refuse?

The Indian Agriculture Minister, Shri Sudarshan Bhagat, opened the event, describing the introduction of IR8 as “a great moment in India’s history”. . . 

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Rural round-up

November 23, 2016

Dog shot after more sheep maulings – Mike Dinsdale:

Four sheep dead, at least 14 more badly mauled and at least one of the dogs responsible dead.

It was a weekend of death near Dargaville as landowners again saw their sheep killed or mauled by marauding dogs, but at least one of those responsible was caught this time.

Overnight on Friday two dogs went onto two properties at Colville Rd and attacked flocks of sheep belonging to Lynley Thompson in one paddock and neighbour Nick Thompson in another. . . 

Search for perfect horse proves fruitful – Sally Rae:

On a farm near Ranfurly, there is a big grey stallion living the life of Brian.
Ballineen Blue Mountain, aka Brian, is making a name for himself in equine circles. As well as the Irish Draught’s own plaudits, success is now coming for his offspring, notably Trevalda Mountain Storm, who was recently recognised as one of five outstanding exhibits at the Canterbury A&P Show in Christchurch.

Such an accolade was “pretty cool” and “a little bit unexpected” for Trevalda Mountain Storm’s breeder and Brian’s owner Tracy Crossan. . . 

Silver Fern sale to complete ahead of schedule

The controversial deal which will see meat processor Silver Fern Farms sell a 50% controlling stake to China’s Shanghai Maling for $267 million in cash is to completed before the end of the year.

The transaction, which was approved by farmer shareholders at two separate meetings, was due to proceed by January 4, 2017.

In a statement, SFF said it would now complete the deal prior to mid-December. Silver Fern Farms chair Rob Hewett said there was little merit in ” simply waiting”. . . 

Dairying in Argentina not for the faint-hearted – Pablo Fraga:

Argentina, once seen as a world ‘bread basket’, today faces many obstacles in achieving this. Argentinean student Pablo Fraga reports on the challenges of dairy farming in his country.

Let me first point out some figures, for context: milk production in Argentina is 11 billion litres per year (versus 20.7b L/year in New Zealand) – twice the production of the 1980s but static for the past ten years.

This places the country eighth in the world in milk production. Exports represent only 20% of national production, the balance being consumed domestically; we are big milk consumers. . . .

British Wool: a thriving industry, thanks to running the last marketing board in the country  Julia Bradshaw:

Every sheep is different, so every fleece is different, you open one up and never know what you’re going to get,” says Ian Brooksbank, a senior head grader for the British Wool Marketing Board (BWMB) – the country’s last surviving agricultural commodities co-operative.

Brooksbank works at its North of England depot, a massive warehouse on the outskirts of Bradford, next to the headquarters of the marketing board. There, he and a team of workers grade and package fleeces from the surrounding counties. Grading takes huge skill, and Brooksbank has years of experience. “I started here in 1990 when I was 16, just pushing the skeps,” he says as he touches the fleece in front of him, pulling out and inspecting the fibres to see how strong and uniform they are. . . 

Iowa farmer challenges activist Vandana Shiva after ‘myth-filled’ anti-GMO lecture – Michelle Miller:

As a farmer, writer, and public speaker, I work very hard to dispel the myths of modern agriculture. Over 90% of certain crop farmers here in the US are growing GMOs for good reasons which I’ve previously outlined here. So when I heard that one of the world’s most famous anti-GMO activists–Indian philosopher Vandana Shiva–was coming to my area in Iowa to speak at Drake University, I felt I need to hear what she had to say and hopefully get the opportunity in a Q&A to speak up.

And, fortunately I got my wish! She had a Q&A and I nervously approached the microphone to speak up on behalf of farmers everywhere. Shiva is known for spreading misinformation about agriculture. . . .


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