Rural round-up

27/10/2022

Labour plans an act of ‘mega stupidity’ – Muriel Newman :

It seems inconceivable that at a time of hyper-inflation and global unrest, any government would deliberately destabilise the agricultural sector by introducing policies that would increase costs to primary producers, reduce production, and fuel price increases. Yet that’s what Jacinda Ardern’s Labour Government is planning to do.

And how are they justifying these radical changes?

Our Prime Minister, the poster child of modern-day socialism, wants to once again boast on the world stage that she’s taking the lead in climate policy – this time by introducing a price on agricultural emissions of greenhouse gases.

No doubt next month’s climate change COP27 talkfest, where tens of thousands of climate activists from all over the world will fly to Egypt to talk about cutting emissions and saving the planet, will provide just such an opportunity. . . 

Rural women flag concerns about community wellbeing – Jessica Marshall :

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) says they have major concerns for the wellbeing of rural communities after the release of the Government’s emissions pricing plan.

The proposed plan, announced earlier this month, will see farm emissions priced at the farm-level, but deviates from the industry recommendations in key aspects. It is currently up for consultation.

While Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern describes the pricing plan as a ‘pragmatic’ approach, RWNZ national president Gill Naylor says her organisation is concerned by the adverse impacts it may have on primary producers, particularly if they aren’t supported while they adapt their practices.

“We are also concerned about the flow-on effects on small towns and regional centres that depend on our primary producers to remain viable and vibrant communities and… the health and wellbeing of our farmers and their families is a concern where they are worrying about the viability of their businesses, and where the place that they call home might be on the line,” Naylor told Rural News. . . 

Cherry growers hopeful for harvest but freight demand, cooler start to spring pose challenges – Tess Brunton :

Central Otago orchards say the upcoming harvest is looking promising but there are more challenges ahead.

The Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) scheme recently received a cap boost with up to 19,000 places available for the 2022-23 year.

Driving through Central Otago, the cherry blossoms are slowly giving way to fruit after a colder start to spring.

45 South employs upwards of 500 people during the cherry harvest. . . 

Shipping reduces agribusiness-emissions :

New Zealand’s newest addition to the coastal shipping fleet, the MV Rangitata, made her maiden voyage in October, carrying product for Ravensdown.

The trip by ship reduced CO emissions by an estimated 39 tonne when compared to moving the same volume of product by road.

She is the newest vessel for Coastal Bulk Shipping Ltd, one of four preferred suppliers in a $30-million Government investment for coastal shipping funding through the National Land Transport Programme (NLTP) to improve domestic shipping services, reduce emissions, improve efficiency, and upgrade maritime infrastructure.

Coastal shipping is forming a key part of Ravensdown’s national emission reduction strategy, says Sustainability Manager Allanah Kidd. . . 

Red meat leaders of the future wanted :

The Meat Industry Association (MIA) is inviting applications for its prestigious scholarship programme from students interested in a career in the red meat processing and exporting sector following a major re-vamp of the initiative.

The popular scholarship programme, now in its sixth year, is focused on supporting highly skilled young people who have the potential to become future leaders in New Zealand’s largest manufacturing industry.

A maximum of three new undergraduate or post-graduate scholars will be selected for the 2023 programme. The selection criteria has been enhanced to focus on a smaller group of high calibre students preparing to pursue a career in the sector.

The undergraduate scholarships will provide $5,000 for each year of study for up to three years. The post-graduate awards are for $10,000 a year for up to two years. The 2023 intake will join the existing 10 scholars in the programme. . . 

Rockit makes a move, heads to South Island :

Pioneering apple company, Rockit Global Limited, is planning for its biggest planting year yet, targeting a further 200ha of trees in the ground in 2023. And it’s taking its global success story south, identifying suitable land and growers in Canterbury and Nelson as well as seeking new partners in Hawke’s Bay and Gisborne, where fruit is currently grown.

Despite sharing many of the same challenges as many other New Zealand fruit varieties this year, Rockit’s forecast orchard gate return has progressively lifted across the year and the company is on track to deliver a record market price. This year more than 76 million New Zealand Rockit™ apples will be shipped, with up to 160 million apples expected in 2023.

Rockit’s General Manager Commercial, Tom Lane, says with international demand for the snack size apples booming and new markets opening up every year, the innovative apple brand is tasked with finding fresh ways to keep up with the hordes of hungry consumers buying Rockit across more than 30 countries including China, India, Vietnam, the USA and UAE. Currently, Rockit grows apples in the northern hemisphere (the USA, UK and Europe) as well as throughout New Zealand’s east coast to ensure year-round global supply. . . 


Rural round-up

26/10/2022

Ag sector not impressed – David Anderson :

NZ’s farming sector has been left disappointed and stunned over the Government’s proposal to price agricultural emissions.

Federated Farmers argues the plans would “rip the guts out of small town New Zealand, putting trees where farms used to be”. It accuses the Government of throwing out the years of work the sector put into finding a solution and said it was “deeply unimpressed” with the Government’s take on what He Waka Eke Noa (HWEN) put forward.

Modelling done by Ministry for Primary Industries shows that without representation – and assuming farmers paid the levies at the farm gate – using the price proposed by HWEN of 11c a kilo of methane, by 2030 production of milksolids would be down by up to 5.9%, lamb down 21.4%, beef down 36.7% and wool down 21.1%.

The same modelling showed that 2.7% of dairy land would go out of dairy production while 17.7% of sheep and cattle country would cease running livestock, presumably to be converted to forestry. . .

Emissions plan will sound death knell for farmer s – Mayor – Peter Burke :

Wairoa Mayor Craig Little says the Government proposal to charge the ag sector for emissions will be the death knell for East Coast farmers.

He says farmers like himself were already being treated like second class citizens and this proposal reinforces that.

“It takes away all hope,” he told Rural News.

Little says farmers are now talking about selling up and going to Australia where he says agriculture is booming. . . 

BLNZ calls out HWEN changes – Annette Scott:

More than two years of cross-sector collaboration with uncomfortable conversations and robust debate on pricing emissions has not been recognised and “I am gutted”, Beef + Lamb New Zealand director Nicky Hyslop says.

“I am gutted as a sheep and beef farmer and as a BLNZ director with the government decision to make significant changes to He Waka Eke Noa (HWEN), which now have an unacceptable impact on a sheep and beef farmer,” Hyslop told farmers at the central South Island farmer council annual meeting.

“We get the current farmer anger and frustration but let’s channel that into strong messages that will resonate with the public, build pressure on the government and get constructive changes to make this whole thing workable.

“The bottom line is we are not going to agree to anything that threatens the viability of our industry and of our family farms. . . 

Call for more support for rural communities’ fight against climate change :

Government support for rural communities is vital to realising the potential in mitigating climate change says Rural Women New Zealand.

“Our members care for our land, our people and rural communities and we acknowledge the need to adapt, however, we would like to see more work on empowering rural communities through the provision of resources to effect positive change,” says National President Gill Naylor.

“There is no doubt that the solutions proposed by the He Waka Eke Noa Primary Sector Climate Change Partnership and the Government’s discussion document on pricing agricultural emissions, will have an impact on rural communities.

“Rural communities include the towns and regional centres which service them – the adverse impact of, and the opportunities afforded by, emissions pricing stretch further than the farm gate. . . 

Trust takes Ahuwhenua Trophy for top farm :

The Wi Pere Trust, a large sheep and beef farming operation at Te Karaka near Gisborne, was awarded the 2022 Ahuwhenua Trophy for the top Māori sheep and beef farm. 

Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor made the announcement at the Ahuwhenua Trophy awards dinner in Hawke’s Bay. He said Māori account for 25% of the production of sheep beef and wool in New Zealand, and have brought a highly professional approach to their farming operations. 

He encouraged everyone to go along to Ahuwhenua Trophy field days to better understand the complexity of the farms and passion of the farmers.

Trudy Meredith of Wi Pere Trust said winning the Ahuwhenua Trophy was absolutely amazing – especially given this was the first time they had entered the competition.  . . 

NZ Rural Land diversifies into forestry – Hugh Stringleman :

New Zealand Rural Land Company (NZL) is moving into forestry land ownership at a cost of $63 million for five properties in the Manawatū/Whanganui region.

The listed landlord has entered an agreement with private company NZ Forest Leasing to acquire the forest estate of approximately 2400ha and lease it all back to NZFL for a period of 20 years.

The settlement date for the acquisition is April 15, 2023 and the first year’s lease payment will be $4.98m.

Thereafter annual lease payments are subject to CPI-linked adjustments. . . 


Black Heels and Tractor Wheels – Sarah Reed

26/08/2022

A new episode of Black Heels and Tractor Wheels:

Today on the podcast, Sarah Reed of The Grumpy Merino (TGM) joins us to have a chat! Sarah, her husband Jono and their three children live on the Grampians in Culverden, North Canterbury. The Grumpy Merino (TGM) is driven by a desire to better utilise merino wool, transforming it into high-quality yarn and blankets. The wool can be traced every step of the way, eventually being crafted into a natural, high-quality, New Zealand-made product. Sarah has an amazing candid chat about her business journey, the biggest lessons and tips she has learnt along the way, as well as the incredible connections she has made with other rural women business owners. 

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels is a Rual Women NZ initiative. You can find out more here.


Black Heels and Tractor Wheels – Meredith Carpenter

25/08/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels is back for another season, episode one features Meredith Carpenter:

Meredith is behind Ruanui Station products, which are 100% New Zealand made from start to finish. The sheep are farmed and shorn at Ruanui Station near Taihape, just as they have been for three generations, which are then woven into luxuriously soft blankets.

Meredith has a great chat with us about her isolated upbringing in Taihape, her experience starting her own business and her top tips for anyone else who may be thinking of doing the same thing!

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels is a Rural Women NZ initiative. You can learn more here.


Rural round-up

16/08/2022

Lack of rural health services distressing – RWNZ :

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) say it is distressing to see rural communities suffer due to a lack of access to quality health services.

RWNZ president Gill Naylor says the health and wellbeing of rural communities is at risk of further deterioration if something is not done to resolve the issues facing people who live, work and play in rural New Zealand.

In June this year, a rural health strategy was added to the Pae Ora Healthy Futures legislation which came into effect last month. The strategy had been removed during the select committee phase but was added back into the legislation after Health Minister Andrew Little was convinced to add it by his party’s ‘rural caucus’.

Naylor says the challenges rural families face with access to health services are varied and include a lack of rural midwives, lack of rural nurses and GPs, lack of rural mental health services, delays in emergency services such as ambulances and long distances to travel for services like allied health and cancer treatment. . . 

Exotics forestation surges on ETS carbon values – Richard Rennie:

The Climate Change Commission is estimating exotic forestation has surged to a rate well beyond the annual levels it says is required for New Zealand to achieve 380,000ha of exotic plantings by 2035.

The commission’s general manager for emissions budgets, Stephen Walter, told delegates at this year’s Carbon Forestry conference that the latest data indicates 60,000ha of exotic forest will be planted this year. That is more than twice the rate the commission envisaged.

This is also reflected in the Ministry for Primary Industries’ workload for accepting forests into the Emissions Trading Scheme. MPI’s ETS forestry manager, Simon Petrie, said there is an application queue of 130,000ha of forest awaiting scheme approval as of June.

The recent move by the commission to recommend the government limit carbon units is partly due to concern that current ETS emissions prices will drive large-scale afforestation for sequestering carbon, rather than behaviour change to reduce emissions. . . 

Rural residents ropeable over lack of cellphone coverage – Rachel Graham :

Residents in Ladbrooks, a seven-minute drive from the edge of suburban Christchurch, say living in a cellphone coverage blackspot is annoying and dangerous.

Ladbrooks School, with its 150 pupils, sits in the centre of a semi-rural area with an increasing number of lifestyle blocks.

It also sits in the middle of a cellphone black spot.

Ladbrooks School principal Margaret Dodds said the lack of cellphone coverage was much more than an inconvenience. . . 

Bale-grazing experiment benefits cows and soil – Shawn McAvinue:

A grass and hay wintering system is showing promising results in Northern Southland.

AgResearch Invermay soil scientist Ross Monaghan is running a nearly $1 million project to explore whether dairy cows grazing on pasture in winter can reduce nitrogen leaching and mud compared with being on traditional forage crops.

The Soil Armour Project was launched in October 2020.

Experiment sites are live on a dairy farm on the Telford campus near Balclutha and Freedom Acres Dairy Farm at Wendonside. . . 

New Zealand’s pipfruit industry gathers in August for National conference :

More than 250 growers, suppliers, industry leaders and government officials from around the country will gather at the Rutherford Hotel in Nelson for the 2022 NZ Apples and Pears Inc (NZAPI) Conference.

The Conference will be held on Thursday 25 and Friday 26 August, with the industry AGM being held on Wednesday 24 August at 4pm. An ‘Agritech in the Orchard’ field day will be also be held on Wednesday 24 August, a collaboration between Callaghan Innovation and NZAPI.

The theme for the 2022 conference is ‘Adapting to New Horizons’. NZAPI CEO Terry Meikle says that two years on from the beginning of the pandemic, we have learned to modify and adapt to a new environment to ensure New Zealand pipfruit can continue to compete on the global stage, demand premiums and remain an industry exemplar.

“NZ is widely regarded as the best apple and pear producer in the world, but to retain that title, we must continue to adapt and innovate. The Conference will explore how we as an industry can meet and succeed in these new environments. . . 

Improving crop resilience with nanoparticles – Neil Savage:

Materials that can carry CRISPR gene-editing into plant cells could be key in the fight against global hunger.

There were sceptics when Michael Strano and his colleagues published their method for using nanoparticles to alter the biology of living plants (J. P. Giraldo et al. Nature Mater. 13, 400–408; 2014). In a letter to Nature Materials, one prominent plant scientist stated that the findings were wrong. “She wrote to the editor and said, ‘What these authors are proposing is not possible. We think they’re misinterpreting their data’,” Strano recalls.

But the chemical engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, won over his critics, overturning an assumption that the membrane of the chloroplast — an organelle within plant cells that is responsible for photosynthesis — was impervious. “We had real-time video of particles going into this seemingly impenetrable chloroplast,” he says. The method, known as lipid exchange envelope penetration (LEEP), allows scientists to calculate where a nanoparticle will go to inside a cell — such as into the chloroplast or another organelle — or whether it will remain in the cytosol, the fluid that surrounds the organelles. This information can inform the design of nanoparticles that carry gene-editing machinery to targeted areas to rewrite the plant’s genome and imbue it with properties such as pest and disease resistance.

In particular, researchers are exploiting the CRISPR gene-editing system to engineer food crops that offer higher yields, or plants that produce compounds used in medications. The technology, for which Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier shared the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, allows specific stretches of DNA to be targeted for editing, deletion or replacement. . .

 


Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Best bits

08/07/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

 


Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Becks Smith

05/07/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today we are speaking to Becks Smith, who is based in Ranfurly with her husband and children. Becks is an extremely busy woman, working as a vet, running a social enterprise, farming on a 700ha Sheep, Beef and Deer property, and raising children.Becks is the founder of the Whole Story NZ, a Social Enterprise using the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals as a framework for inspiring, facilitiating and articulating conscious, holistic sustainability on farms. We talk to Becks about the Whole Story, her passions, and her experience being a Zanda McDonald Award Finalist (and her love of a bit of drum and bass.


Black Heels & Trator Wheels – Becks Tosswill

04/07/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today we are speaking to Becks Tosswill, who is based in the Wairarapa with her three children and husband Richard. She is the founder and owner of Farmers Daughter Design Studio, which is based on the 650-hectare Wairarapa hill country farm that she and her husband own. Their farm is known for its innovation, having won the Supreme Award at the Greater Wellington Ballance Farm Environment Awards and the 2021 Wairarapa Sheep & Beef Farm Business of the Year. Becks talks to us about following your passions, what makes a good brand, the journey of starting your own business and how Richard and Becks have incorporated innovation into their farming. 

 

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Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Kiri Elworthy

02/07/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today we are speaking to Kiri Elworthy, who is based in Martinborough with her husband James. Kiri and her husband own and run Tora Coastal Walk, a three-day, fully catered walk and two 650ha farms, which are where the Coastal Walk is based. Kiri started her journey in Riversdale, eventually heading to Lincoln University. However, at the end of her first year, she got pregnant with her daughter Margot. Kiri discusses her journey so candidly and honestly, discussing her experiences flatting and studying whilst being a single mother, taking over a family business and the conservation efforts herself and James implement on their farm.



Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Clare Bradley

30/06/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today we are speaking to Clare Bradley, CEO of AgriSea, who is based in Paeroa with her husband Tane and their three children. Clare started her career after studying Biology at Auckland University. She previously lived and worked for 2 years in the Amazon Rainforest, with a remote community helping them to develop enterprises that would conserve their rainforest. AgriSea was founded more than 20 years ago by Clare’s mother and father-in-law. The company produces seaweed-based concentrates used in the agriculture, horticulture, viticulture, and apiculture sectors.


Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Jenny McDonald

29/06/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today we are speaking with Jenny McDonald, currently our star National Finance Chair here at Rural Women. Jenny lives in Canterbury with her husband Mark and has three grown children, Jack, George, and Annie. 

Jenny has always been determined to forge her own career as an accountant as well as supporting her husband on the farm.

She talks about the challenges of balancing this with farm life and raising a family in a new island where initially, she didn’t know a lot of people. While shes always been a get things done kind of person, she also acknowledges a couple of times in her life where she has experienced some difficult challenges, which she talks about very openly with us today, along with ways that we can all help those in our communities who need our support.  


Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Raewyn van Vugt

28/06/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today, we speak to Raewyn van Vugt who operates a dairy farming business with her husband Rob in Otago 🙌🏻

Raewyn grew up on the West Coast of the South Island, as a coal miners’ daughter in a small town called Reefton. In 1991 she moved to Inch Clutha with her husband Rob, where their farming enterprise started.

Raewyn has been heavily involved in her community, being a member and Treasurer of Plunket, Playcentre, PTA, and involved with the local discussion group, Large Herds Otago Committee and a Networker for Fonterra. She is also a member of the Inch Clutha RW and is currently the Regional Leader for Region 1.

Raewyn gives some tips for any aspiring farm owners, details her experiences going from a single mum to operating a successful farming enterprise with her husband, and helpful ways to get involved in your rural community.

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Rural round-up

22/06/2022

Rural backbone of regions expected to stand up better to economic woes:

Rural economies are expected to outperform their urban counterparts in the year ahead, due to the strong demand for agricultural exports.

Westpac Bank’s annual Regional Roundup report forecasts economic growth would slow in the year ahead, as high inflation and rising interest rates put pressure on household budgets.

But the severity of the slowdown would be felt differently across the country.

The outlook for the cities, in particular Wellington and Auckland, would be challenging because they had two of the worst performing housing markets in recent months. . . 

Farmers urged to tell their stories, develop brand – Sally Rae:

“Farmers are the world’s rock stars.”

That was the message from entrepreneur Justine Ross to more than 400 farmers, industry representatives and sponsors attending the two-day South Island Dairy Event (Side) in Oamaru yesterday.

But farmers also needed to be brave “and a little bit louder” as they were terrible at telling their stories, which consumers around the world were craving to hear.

“They want to hear about your farms, hear about your life. They want to know you,” Mrs Ross said. . . 

NZI Rural Women NZ Business Awards 2022 open :

The NZI Rural Women NZ Business Awards 2022 are now open for entries.

The Awards, run by Rural Women New Zealand and insurance company NZI, take place each year and are designed to celebrate rural women entrepreneurs.

Rural Women New Zealand national president Gill Naylor says the Awards are a great opportunity to showcase the contributions rural women entrepreneurs make to rural communities.

“We are delighted that NZI will join us for the sixth year as our Premier Partner in presenting the Awards. . . 

Science and genetics boost Fernside farm :

Fernside dairy farmer Julie Bradshaw has applied learnings from a five-year National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) irrigation study to make science-based decisions while also using genetics to improve her herd with the overall goal of reducing the farm’s environmental footprint.

Julie is participating in a six-month farming innovation project, which examines how the next generation of farmers are using innovative approaches to improve their farming practices. Waimakariri Landcare Trust (WLT) and Waimakariri Irrigation Limited (WIL) have partnered with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) for the project, with support from MPI’s Sustainable Food and Fibre Futures fund along with Environment Canterbury, Ballance, and DairyNZ.

From 2016 to 2021 Julie and a group of five neighbouring farmers participated in a co-innovation study which provided landowners with real time data and forecasts to make science-based irrigation decisions.

The data included measured rainfall, soil moisture, soil temperature, drainage, and estimated evaporation as well as two, six and 15-day rainfall and weather forecasts. . . 

Laura Marston from Craggy Range takes out Hawkes Bay 2022 Corveta Young Vit title :

Congratulations to Laura Martson from Craggy Range who took out the title of Corteva Hawke’s Bay Young Viticulturist of the Year 2022.

The competition took place in the stunning Paritua vineyards in Bridge Pa Triangle on 16 June 2022 with eight contestants competing for the title.

Congratulations also goes to Douw Grobler from Trinity Hill who came second and Robbie Golding from Crab Farm, who came third.

The judges commented on the professional and positive attitude of all the contestants and that there are many passionate and talented young people in the Hawke’s Bay wine industry. The other contestants were Daniel Brewster from AONZ, Jamie Scoon from Te Mata, Joseph Stenberg from Woodthorpe Terraces and Jessica Sunderland-Wells and Sarah St George, both from Villa Maria. . .

Innovative Pāmu deer milk product wins prestigious global award :

Pāmu’s awarding winning Deer Milk won the Best Dairy Ingredient category at the World Dairy Innovation Awards, announced in Laval, France overnight.

Pāmu Chief Executive Mark Leslie says the win in these prestigious awards is a validation of the hard work and innovation that has gone into creating an all-new product for the agri-sector.

“All New Zealanders, as shareholders in Pāmu should be really proud of this win, at what is essentially the World Cup for the dairy sector.

“Our deer milk product has been steadily growing in popularity among high end chefs and as a unique new ingredient in cosmetics. But that’s not where it ends. . . 


Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Shaz Dagg

27/05/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today we are speaking to the incredible, ‘limb-it-less’ Shaz Dagg. She is New Zealand’s first elite para-triathlete and Parafed Manawatū’s sport development adviser. In 2016, Shaz’s left arm was crushed by a gate while she was working on a goat farm.

After multiple complications, and nine surgeries, the arm was amputated above her elbow. Prior to her farm accident, Shaz represented New Zealand at the 2014 ITU world duathlon championships in Spain and raced in a number of Ironman events.

She also competed as an age-grade triathlete and decided to come back to the sport after her accident.By 2018 she had qualified to represent New Zealand at the triathlon world champs on the Gold Coast, becoming the country’s first Para triathlete.

In 2021 Shaz was the first ever female amputee to complete the Coast – to Coast.  If you enjoyed this episode, feel free to visit our Instagram, Facebook, and website, or even become a member! www.ruralwomennz.nz  

 

 


Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Shaz Dagg

13/05/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today we are speaking to the incredible, ‘limb-it-less’ Shaz Dagg. She is New Zealand’s first elite para-triathlete and Parafed Manawatū’s sport development adviser. 

In 2016, Shaz’s left arm was crushed by a gate while she was working on a goat farm.

After multiple complications, and nine surgeries, the arm was amputated above her elbow. Prior to her farm accident, Shaz represented New Zealand at the 2014 ITU world duathlon championships in Spain and raced in a number of Ironman events.

She also competed as an age-grade triathlete and decided to come back to the sport after her accident.

By 2018 she had qualified to represent New Zealand at the triathlon world champs on the Gold Coast, becoming the country’s first Para triathlete.

In 2021 Shaz was the first ever female amputee to complete the Coast – to Coast.  

If you enjoyed this episode, feel free to visit our Instagram, Facebook, and website, or even become a member! www.ruralwomennz.nz 

 


Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Maria Kuster

12/05/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today we are speaking with Maria Kuster, a rural businesswoman with a twist, who along with her partner Sean runs the incredible Pure Salt boat charter business in Tamatea/Dusky Sound. 

Originally hailing from Germany,  Maria stepped on a plane as a young woman arriving in the South Island and found that Aotearoa was where her future and heart lay. 

Since then Maria and Sean have created their business to embrace conservation, right from the beginning with a string of successful projects on land and in the sea, in restoring Dusky to its original state. 

If you enjoyed this episode, feel free to visit our Instagram, Facebook, and website, or even become a member! www.ruralwomennz.nz 


Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Sophie Hurley

11/05/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today Sophie Hurley joins us on the podcast, one half of the duo behind Honest Wolf.

Sophie is based in the Turakina Valley in the North Island, where she lives with her husband Sam and son Harry.  

Sophie Sam launched Honest Wolf, a line of accessories made from wool from the family farm, in 2020. Honest Wolf’s goal is to make wool the sustainable go-to fiber in the luggage and accessories industry.

With another baby on the way, Sophie talks to us about her next steps with Honest Wolf, how she juggles running her own business with a young family, and shares her experiences and advice for starting up a business from your passions. 

If you enjoyed this episode, feel free to visit our Instagram, Facebook, and website, or even become a member! www.ruralwomennz.nz 

 

 


Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Sarah Martelli

10/05/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today, Sarah Martelli joins us on the podcast, who amongst many other things is the incredible woman behind Strong Woman.

Sarah is a mum to three young children and lives with her husband Mathew, her kids, a spoodle puppy, pet pig, and chickens, on a 400 cow dairy farm in Reporoa, New Zealand.

Life is pretty hectic with juggling kids’ activities, helping on the farm, the household, and being actively involved on the PTA committee and as sports co-ordinator at the local primary school.

Sarah had a Molar Pregnancy – a very rare gynaecological abnormality where instead of growing a baby, the cells didn’t form properly and grew into a cancerous tumour called Choriocarsinoma. She very candidly and bravely talks to us about her journey and how this encouraged her to create the Strong Woman community.

In 2017, she qualified as a Personal Trainer. Sarah runs an Online fitness membership platform, group fitness classes, and personal training sessions. In 2020 she completed a Certificate in Exercise Nutrition, and now provides one on one health coaching to women from all over New Zealand, and in 2021 she trained to become a Qualified Pilates Instructor. 


Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Amber Forrest

09/05/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today’s guest is our 2021 Supreme Winner at the NZI Rural Women NZ Business Awards, Amber Forrest.
Amber is based in Wairoa and provides the only full-time beauty therapy clinic with fully qualified staff in the region, a salon called BeautyAntix.
Amber has built an award-winning business which is immersed in the diversity of its clientele and community. It provides a wide range of expert, professional treatments and provides a career path for young women, particularly Māori, through a nationally recognised Beauty and Wellness Training facility.
The Beauty Antix motto is Exceeding Expectation with Expertise. It is an environment that is open, inclusive, and respectful to all customers and serves its community in a uniquely holistic way 

 

 


Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Tia Potae

07/05/2022

Today we are very lucky to speak to Tia Potae, the winner of the inaugural Primary Industries award at the 2021 Women of Influence New Zealand Awards. Tia is based in the sunny Coromandel, but hails from Milton at the bottom of the South Island 👏

The Potae name is extremely well known in shearing circles, with her grandfather’s brother George Potae winning the Golden Shears in 1969. Tia herself has been in the shearing industry all her life, representing New Zealand in woolhandling in 2005 and 2013.

Tia has a huge list of achievements and is truly a champion of rural communities ✨

Tia is a Whānau Ora navigator at Tokomairiro Waiora and won the award for supporting shearers and their families through the challenges of Covid-19. During the 2020 lockdown, she developed an online programme for wool, forestry and fishing industry workers who found it difficult to access services after hours. She also helped workers access the Wage Subsidy Scheme. 

Tia is also a rural navigator for Tokomairiro Waiora, a Kaupapa Māori Health Service providing Whānau Ora services in South Otago. Her rural navigator programme was a response to a Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu 2019 survey of wool harvesters which found they needed better access to health and social services.

And if you thought she couldn’t possibly do any more, she also has a small business, Taki Toru Woolshed Services, where she runs her own training programme. . . .


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