Rural round-up

24/03/2022

ORC plan has far-reaching implications – Mark Patterson:

“Consultation on the Otago Regional Council’s new land and water plan has recently been under way,” writes Federated Farmers Otago president Mark Patterson.

The outcomes will set parameters for farming for the next decade or more.

Stage one is consulting the public on what are our shared visions for environmental outcomes in Otago. I would call it the kumbaya phase.

Everyone, farmers especially, cares about the state of our waterways and safe drinking water. While this phase is a necessary first step it’s hard not to see it as a box-ticking exercise given the outcome is heavily prescribed by the overarching national policy statement. . .

Don’t forget farmers when it comes to fuel prices – Jacqueline Rowarth:

Farming in New Zealand is under threat and overlooking the cost of fuel on-farm is yet another pressure, Dr Jacqueline Rowarth writes.

The reality of trying to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) was made startlingly clear this month.

When the price at the pump went up, the government announced a cut in fuel excise duties to allow people to continue life as usual.

The cut was an acknowledgment of the effect of fuel on the cost of living, which is part of the reason so many countries support fossil fuel subsidies. . . 

Forestry rules about to be upturned – Keith Woodford:

More forestry upheavals are coming as the Government foreshadows big changes to the rules of the game. Sheep and beef farmers including iwi are the big prospective losers.

In 2018, the Government announced that it was moving towards a new regime for New Zealand forestry within the Emission Trading Scheme (ETS).  The plans included a new so-called ‘permanent forestry’ category for introduced species, also known as exotics.

The relevant legislation was passed in 2020 with regulations subsequently added for enactment on I January 2023. Industry has been moving forward on that basis. Things are now about to be upturned.

Over the last 12 months, the Government has been getting nervous about what it had set in place. It took a while, but Government now understands what some of us understood somewhat earlier, that carbon forestry has become the most profitable game in the country.  That was not what they intended. . . 

Protecting bees from killer mites:

The parasitic mite Varroa destructor is a severe threat to New Zealand’s honey bees. Since the mite appeared on our shores twenty years ago, affected bees have not been able to survive without human intervention.

Effective treatment for varroa is essential for protecting our most productive pollinators.

More bee colonies are now being lost due to varroa mites than any other cause, according to the latest Ministry for Primary industries annual bee surveillance report. This was the first time in the survey’s history that the mite had been most frequently attributed to colony losses, with queen problems previously being considered the leading cause.

Agcarm chief executive Mark Ross says “Varroa wiped out wild bee colonies as it spread throughout the country, so it’s essential that beekeepers remain highly vigilant, check for its presence and treat hives with miticides – at the right time and with the right dose.” . . 

Career growth opportunities abound for Canterbury North Otago Dairy Industry Awards winner :

The winner of the 2022 Canterbury/North Otago Dairy Industry Awards is excited about the opportunities for career growth within the dairy industry.

Will Green was announced winner of the region’s Share Farmer of the Year category at Trott’s Garden in Ashburton on Tuesday evening.

Other major winners were Jaspal Singh, who was named the 2022 Canterbury/North Otago Dairy Manager of the Year, and Peter O’Connor, the 2022 Canterbury/North Otago Dairy Trainee of the Year.

Will has tasted success in the Dairy Industry Awards as the 2018 Canterbury/North Otago Dairy Manager of the Year and was also awarded the National Runner-Up title. . . 

New Zealand Young Farmers welcomes new sponsors to the NZYF tournament series :

Four agricultural organisations have jumped at the chance to support the New Zealand Young Farmers (NZYF) Tournament Series.

With a rich 80-year history, the NZYF Tournament Series now consists of the Hunting and Fishing clay target shooting, Goldpine fencing, NZ Farmers Livestock stock judging and Tavendale and Partners debating competitions.

NZYF Board Chair Kent Weir says these sponsors have made a world of difference to the Tournament Series which starts at grass roots club level.

“It’s fantastic to have these businesses on board to support our Clubs with hosting their tournaments locally and at a national level as well,” he said. . . 

 


Rural round-up

08/03/2022

Pressure on supply chain affects meat – Riley Kennedy:

Meat companies are warning farmers to be prepared to hold on to livestock for longer as the Omicron outbreak begins to cause processing delays.

Covid-19 case numbers have skyrocketed in the past week putting pressure on supply chains as more and more staff have to self-isolate.

Alliance Group – which operates four plants in the lower South Island – confirmed that none of its staff had been on site while infectious, but chief executive David Surveyor said it was inevitable that the communities where it operated would be affected by Covid.

Across its network, Alliance had rising levels of absenteeism as community levels of Covid saw “a number of” its staff staying home to isolate or look after children because schools were closed. . . 

Kiwifruit leaders on Omicron, rapid antigen testing, chronic labour shortage and upcoming record harvest – Carmen Hall:

Another record-breaking kiwifruit harvest is expected this season but a crippling labour shortage combined with Omicron concerns have put growers, major packhouses and contractors on edge.

About 24,000 seasonal workers would be required to pick and pack the crop nationally and New Zealand Kiwifruit Growers Inc has forecast there could be a shortfall of 6,500 people. The Bay of Plenty needed 20,000 of those workers as it was the largest kiwifruit producing region.

Major packhouse leaders spoken to by NZME are in recruitment mode for Kiwis and were reliant on getting their full contingent of Recognised Seasonal Employer staff into the country as soon as possible.

Most were paying the living wage of $22.75 per hour or more as the start rate, with another $2 an hour for night shifts and eight per cent holiday pay. . . 

Love of data, farming nous combine in quest to hone quality – Sally Rae:

Anna Boyd is on a mission to help New Zealand’s beef industry maximise profitability — in a sustainable way — through the uptake of good genetics. She talks to rural editor Sally Rae about her passion for cattle. Anna Boyd reckons she could work with cattle all day, every day.

It is a passion that stemmed from her exposure to livestock growing up on remote Haldon Station, on the northern shores of Lake Benmore, in the Mackenzie Country.

The 22,000ha property, which has been managed by her father Paddy for many years, is both diverse and innovative and she has had the opportunity to work with sheep, deer and cattle.

“I think I was allowed to kind of find my feet and find out what interested me the most and where my passions lay,” Ms Boyd said. . . 

Woolies jeans: New Zealand made merino jeans anticipates launch for mid-June 2022 :

After a blockbuster end to 2021 where Kaitaia born Shearer, Jovian Garcia-Cummins, 26, raised $337,426, from 220 investors, for his start-up Woolies Jeans, the company is set to launch and subsequently expand on ‘ideas from a woolshed’ at Fieldays 2022.

‘Right now, we’re getting our ducks aligned so that we are prepared to handle the orders we are anticipating. I have been overwhelmed by the amount of Kiwis wanting to give me a helping hand,’ says Garcia-Cummins, who is still juggling time between shearing and launching his new invention.

Woolies Jeans has been working with some big names in NZ fashion to bring the ideas to light. This includes collaborating with Award-Winning Designer Wynn Hamlyn, Sustainable Textile Agencies Ltd and NZ’s largest clothing producer Albion to take Garcia-Cummins and his ‘Mum’s ideas to a level of professional scalability.

The jeans themselves are unique to the market because they have a unique 100% merino lining interior and a high-quality sustainable denim exterior. This means that customers will be able to have 100% merino against their legs and hips but the denim exterior is used to protect the merino and look good. Woolies Jeans will also be NZ Made. . . 

Pandemic increases demand for deer velvet – Sally Murphy:

Strong demand for deer velvet has pushed up returns for farmers 20 percent higher than last season.

As well as farming for venison, many deer farmers harvest velvet and export it to Asian markets, where it’s believed to have healing properties.

Deer Industry New Zealand markets manager Rhys Griffiths said the pandemic has increased demand for health food products including velvet.

“It’s another season were we’ve seen some pretty good growth, in tonnage terms we are now just under a thousand tonnes so it’s doubled in the last 10 years. . . 

NI farmers ‘at end of tether’ over inaction in tackling bovine TB:

Farmers in Northern Ireland are ‘at end of their tether’ over inaction in tacking bovine TB in the region, the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU) has warned.

It comes as farmers eagerly await an announcement by the Department of Agriculture (DAERA) on the intended route for bTB eradication following a consultation.

Possible new measures include new steps to tackle TB in wildlife, the testing of non-bovines for bTB, and the increased use of the interferon gamma blood test in cattle.

Farmers could also see changes to the level and rates on which compensation is paid out to those who lose cows to the disease. . . 


Rural round-up

02/02/2022

Farmers urged to plan for Omicron – Peter Burke:

Farmers are being urged to have good plans in place for dealing with any major community outbreak of Covid-19 and, in particular, the omicron variant.

Will Halliday of Beef+Lamb NZ is part of a pan-primary sector group – which include DairyNZ, MPI, the deer and pork industries and Federated Farmers – that have been preparing advice for farmers to deal with this contingency.

All of these organisations have advice on their respective websites aimed at making it easy for those in the primary sector to plan for such an outbreak.

There are also copies of this information in vet clinics and rural supply stores. . .

Virus stops Cavalcade in its tracks – Shannon Thomson:

“Gut wrenching.” That is how organisers describe the decision to pull the pin on the 2022 Goldfields Cavalcade.

The event’s cancellation – and its 30th celebrations along with it – was officially announced yesterday in the wake of ever-changing Covid-19 traffic light phases and regulations.

The event was scheduled for the end of this month, with hundreds of Cavalcaders expected to converge on host town Millers Flat on March 5.

Otago Goldfields Heritage Trust (OGHT) secretary and Cavalcade co-ordinator Terry Davis said he and fellow co-ordinator trust treasurer Odette Hopgood-Bride had hoped to continue the event under the Red traffic light setting but as new phases and restrictions were introduced last week, it became obvious it was not an option. . . 

The surf’s (back) up for farmers – Rebecca Ryan:

North Otago and South Canterbury farmers are enjoying being able catch a break.

Since Surfing for Farmers returned to Kakanui last month, 20 to 30 farmers have been heading to Campbells Bay each week to take part in the national mental health initiative aimed at helping farmers manage stress by teaching them to surf.

Kakanui co-ordinator Alfie Broughton said everyone had different reasons for attending the Wednesday night Surfing for Farmers events.

“Mainly people just love coming and doing something different,” he said. . . 

Horror trip finishes on a high note :

When 14 hours turned into 60 calamitous hours trucking 33-head from the South to the North Island, the Gilbert family knew they were up against it more than usual at the New Zealand Dairy Event (NZDE).

LITERALLY NEARLY EVERYTHING THAT COULD GO WRONG, DID.

Just north of Cheviot in North Canterbury their truck’s clutch went, which left them stranded on the side of the road with the cows on-board (top and bottom) from 9.45pm until 3.30am the next morning, when they were towed 92km back to a mechanic’s garage in Rangiora.

CRESSLANDS TO THE RESCUE . . 

Thank goodness NZDE pushed on :

The overwhelming response coming out the New Zealand Dairy Event (NZDE) was exhibitor relief that the show went ahead.

The timing of the government moving New Zealand to a red traffic light COVID-19 protection framework couldn’t have been worse – with exhibitors either already at the show at Manfield Park, Feilding – or on the way.

Exhibitor numbers were immediately limited on-ground to 100 (plus event staff), and any hope of spectators being allowed onto the showgrounds were dashed.

Part of the solution came in the form of bidr®, New Zealand’s online selling platform, which stepped up to livestream the event. It is the first time that’s happened in New Zealand. . . 

Struggling country churches a new target in city exodus – Chris McLennan:

City folk chasing a lifestyle change in the country are also turning their attention to abandoned churches.

A selling agent said he could hardly believe the amount of interest being shown in the Uniting Church at Glenthompson in Victoria’s western district which goes to public auction in a few weeks.

“People are ringing from Melbourne, from Sydney, from all over,” David Jennings, the Elders agent in Ararat, said excitedly.

This small rural town of about 250 people is about three hours drive west from Melbourne. . . 


Rural round-up

18/12/2021

 Government ‘tone deaf’ to meat industry’s needs – Sally Rae:

The Meat Industry Association has lambasted what is understood to be the approval of 15 long-term critical worker visas for halal butchers – when 45 are “desperately” needed – saying it shows the Government is “tone deaf to the needs of business”.

Muslim markets and many customers demanded meat be processed in the halal way; 49 out of 55 processing plants in New Zealand operated halal systems and relied on 250 halal butchers.

In a statement yesterday, MIA chief executive Sirma Karapeeva said the “miserly” approval knee-capped the ability of the second-largest goods export sector to fully contribute to New Zealand’s economy and capture higher value from its exports.

Halal certified products contributed about $3.7 billion of annual export earnings. The sector could typically recruit only 100 halal butchers domestically due to New Zealand’s small Muslim population and the nature of the job. . . 

Farmers will want to milk it – Sudesh Kissun:

Dairy farmers will be milking cows for as long as they can to capitalise on a record milk price this season.

Soaring farm input costs may erode profit margins, but a milk price near $9/kgMS provides farmers the chance to boost income and reduce debt.

Fonterra chief executive Miles Hurrell says farmers around the globe are facing inflationary pressures and NZ is no exception.

“But I don’t think there will be any adverse reaction to milk production,” says Hurrell. . .

T&G Global to invest millions in automated packhouse, orchard redevelopment

Produce company T&G Global has announced it will pour in millions of dollars to expand its apples business to meet growing consumer demand. 

The company will invest $100 million into a new automated packhouse and has committed millions more to orchard redevelopment across Hawke’s Bay and Nelson.

The announcement comes after T&G downgraded its full-year profit expectations in October, due to persistent labour shortages and rising shipping costs.

T&G, which is one of New Zealand’s largest apple growers and marketers, said its premium Envy apple was on track to be a billion-dollar brand. . . 

Funding of hemp fibre innovation set to propel New Zealand on to world stage :

New Government funding will help a New Zealand hemp fibre company explore untapped opportunities – from soft flooring to food packaging that’s more environmentally sustainable.

The Government is contributing $1.34 million through MPI’s Sustainable Food and Fibre Futures fund (SFF Futures) to New Zealand Natural Fibres’ (NZNF) five-year research and development programme project. NZNF is the only hemp fibre company in New Zealand that controls its own supply chain end-to-end. The company is contributing a further $2 million in cash and in kind to the project.

“We plan to use the SFF Futures funding to develop our hemp growing, processing and marketing capability to ‘go further, faster’ towards taking a global leadership position in the development of industrial and consumer products made from hemp fibre,” says NZNF CEO Colin McKenzie.

“We are very pleased to have received government backing to continue our work with hemp fibre, which has huge potential to be part of the solution to some of the most crucial environmental challenges facing our planet today. . . 

Gearing up for harvest:

The export cherry season is now underway and in New Zealand, summerfruit has started appearing in the supermarkets.  In other words, the new season’s fruit harvest is gathering pace, as Christmas fast approaches and the great kiwi summer getaway also gets underway. 

Tomorrow, the Auckland borders will finally be open. Unfortunately across some areas of the country, there is apprehension and reservations about this change.  But let’s not pre-empt any negative thoughts.  Our Auckland comrades have done it very hard for a long period.  To help growers and packhouse operators prepare for in the event of a positive Covid test, we have worked with the Ministry of Primary Industries to pull together advice on what to do.  Click here to access that advice. 

The most important things to do are to isolate the worker and their bubble, alert your local District Health Board and follow their instructions regarding the public health implications, and contact your product group for further advice.  In terms of any media interest, it is recommended to direct any journalist to your product group or HortNZ for any comment as you will be busy managing the response and we are all here to help you.  . . 

Once perceived as a problem, conservation grazing by cattle a boon to vernal pools :

Giving 1,200-pound cows access to one of California’s most fragile and biologically rich ecosystems seems a strange way to protect its threatened and endangered species.

But a recently published study suggests that reintroducing low to moderate levels of cattle grazing around vernal pools – under certain conditions – leads to a greater number and greater variety of native plants.

“We found that after 40 years of rest from grazing, reintroducing conservation grazing had – across the board – positive impacts on vernal pool plant diversity,” said Julia Michaels, a visiting professor at Reed College who led a three-year study in a Sacramento-area reserve during her time as a UC Davis Ph.D. student.

Ecologists consider vernal pools – ephemeral ponds that form seasonally – “islands of native habitat” amid California’s grasslands that are dominated by exotic grasses. These biodiversity hotspots harbor about 200 native species of animals and plants, such as the coyote thistle, which germinates under water and forms a snorkel-like straw to deliver oxygen to its roots – and then “fills in” its stem as the pool dries. . . 


Rural round-up

09/10/2021

Gas profiles on target – Richard Rennie:

The pastoral sector is doubling down on its efforts to measure and price its greenhouse gas (GHG) emission as an alternative to becoming captured under the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS).

He Waka Eke Noa, the primary sector’s climate action partnership is working to implement a pricing and allocation scheme specifically for the primary sector’s emissions that keep it separate from the ETS.

One requirement the Government placed upon the industry was that 25% of all farms must know their annual on-farm GHG emissions by the end of this year, and 100% by the end of 2022.

DairyNZ strategy and investment leader Bruce Thorrold says the dairy sector has calculated the GHG profiles of 91% of the country’s dairy farms, largely in part to the efforts of Fonterra in recording farmer suppliers’ emissions. . . 

Cruel April Fool’s joke! – Mark Daniel:

In an ironic twist, the Government has pushed back the date of its so-called ‘ute tax’ or feebate scheme to April 1 next year – April Fools’ Day!

The delay – from the original January 1 date – was announced by Minister of Transport Michael Wood. “The rollout has been delayed because of the disruption caused by the current Delta outbreak,” he claims.

This is despite the unworkability of the scheme that has been identified by the motor industry and users like farmers and tradies.

Many in the vehicle sector also point out that Delta is actually the reason for increased production costs, monumental rises in shipping costs and long delays in product landing in New Zealand. . . 

Event winners world class

It was a fierce battle on the board between the wool industry’s elite shearers and woolhandlers in Alexandra at the weekend.

The 60th New Zealand Merino Shears were held at a near-empty Molyneux Stadium in compliance with Covid-19 Level 2 guidelines.

More than 70 woolhandlers and 65 shearers took part, and in the end it was two former world champions walking away with the major titles.

Invercargill shearer Nathan Stratford claimed the NZ Merino Open shearing title for the fifth time, beating runner-up Ringakaha Paewai. . . 

Cold August weather sees NZ milk production fall :

Cool, wet weather is being blamed on a 4.2% fall in milksolids production during August, Fonterra’s latest Global Dairy Update says.

Following a good start to the season, pasture conditions were impacted as a result of colder and wetter weather in August compared to a milder August last year. New Zealand milk production for the 12 months to August was 2.4% lower than last year.

The co-operative’s milk collection for August was 96.7 million kg MS, 4% lower than the same month last season and its season-to-date collection was 130.9m kg MS, 2.8% behind last season.

The colder month affected collections across both North and South Islands. Its North Island milk collection was 71.8m kg MS, 2.3% lower than August last season and its season-to-date collection was 101.7m kg MS, 0.1% ahead of last season. . . 

Much experience packed into 100 years – Sandy Eggleston:

From the farm to Karitane nursing to working in Harrods in London to back on the farm, Eleanor Logan has packed many interesting experiences into a century of living.

The Resthaven Care Home resident celebrates her 100th birthday in Gore today.

Mrs Logan (nee Galt) said she grew up on a farm at Tuturau.

Life on the farm was busy with children helping out before and after school. . .

Agritourism’s ‘no vaccine, no entry’ – Annabelle Cleeland:

Tourism industry providers across regional Victoria are preparing for mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations to be a key feature of their industry going forward.

The ‘no vaccine, no entry’ is the position of Donovan and Melissa Jacka of Tolpuddle Goat Cheese and Farm Foods, near Wangaratta, as they prepare to introduce a vaccine passport system when they re-open to tourists in November.

In a post on Facebook and Instagram, the Jackas wrote when they re-opened, visitors to Tolpuddle must be fully vaccinated (if they were eligible and can be vaccinated).

“The idea that a person has the right to choose not to be vaccinated, thereby jeopardising the health of someone who cannot be vaccinated, is deeply offensive,” the post stated. . . 


Rural round-up

01/10/2021

Ball dropped! – Rural News:

For more than a year now the primary sector has been crying out for changed around immigration settings to help ease numerous critical worker shortages right across the country’s key export earning industries.

The Government and immigration officials have badly dropped the ball on this issue – with the entire country is paying for their incompetence.

There is no doubt that things have been complicated by Covid-19 and the ongoing restrictions this has placed on allowing people into the country. However, governments are elected – and officials employed and well paid – to come up with solutions to such problems. Yet the piecemeal, ad-hoc, minimal changes made by both in this area are a national disgrace.

For starters, Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi has been completely MIA – that’s ‘missing in action’, not the Meat Industry Association, which is probably keen to chat to him on immigration issues, as is the rest of the primary sector. He is clearly either out of his depth or not interested and the Prime Minister should have relieved him of the portfolio months ago. One suspects that because her caucus has all the depth of the bird bath, and any capable minister is already overloaded, there is no one with the talent to manage or oversee this highly challenging role. . .

Catchment groups need to be farmer-led – Jessica Marshall:

Catchment projects need to be farmerled, according to Louise Totman, who coordinates the Rangitikei Rivers Catchment Collective.
Totman says the decision to join the collective needs to be a farmer-led initiative on behalf of the sub-catchment group.

The Rangitikei collective is an umbrella for 17 sub-catchment groups, covering 700,000ha across the Rangitikei, Turakina, and Whangaehu river catchments. Recently it received $910,000 in Government funding.

“We don’t do a big push to get these groups up and running,” she told Dairy News. . . 

Old dogs finding a new home – Shawn McAvinue:

A North Otago teacher is giving retired working dogs a second chance at life.

Waitaki Boys’ High School agriculture teacher Elizabeth Prentice adopted her dog Meg after seeing her listed on the website of Retired Working Dogs.

Before retiring, the pig dog worked in pest control around the world, including Bali and Canada.

Her former owner lives in Ashhurst, near Palmerston North, and loved Meg, she said. . . 

Radical dog biscuits the cherry on top – Ashley Smyth:

There is a saying, you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, but after turning to pet food production after 50 years of farming, John Newlands may beg to differ. He talks to Ashley Smyth about how Radical Dog started, how it is going and where it is heading.

When it comes to food for dogs, Radical Dog could be the pick of the crop.

The dog biscuits are made using Montmorency tart cherries and are the brainchild of John and Maureen Newlands, of Incholme, near Maheno.

In the late 1980s, the couple were considering options to integrate something different into their farming business which used their irrigation more efficiently, and they wanted grow something high yielding and profitable, within a small land area.

 

Auckland BioSciences buys Australia’s CellSera, creating $40m firm – Chris Keall:

In a pandemic year that has seen so many New Zealand tech firms bought by offshore rivals, Auckland BioSciences (ABS) has bucked the trend by acquiring Australia’s CellSera.

ABS manufactures and exports New Zealand-made serum and plasma, derived from the blood of cows, pigs and sheep, sourced from meat processing plants around NZ.

Animal serum is a key ingredient for cell culture in bio-pharmaceutical manufacturing and is used in medical research and in the manufacture of human and veterinary products such as vaccines and other biological preparations, ABS says.

The global cell culture market is expected to reach US$36 billion by 2027, according to one market researcher. . . 

Allbirds 2.0? Woolies seeks crowdfund to take ‘NZ Made’ merino jeans worldwide :

Auckland-based jeans company Woolies Jeans will launch an equity crowdfunding campaign on 4 October to fund their international launch

Started in 2018 by Jovian Garcia Cummins, Woolies Jeans was created in a woolshed, where a then 22 year old Jovian, became fed up with the workwear he was wearing – and thus enlisted his mother to help create his first pair of jeans made with comfortable merino lining and protective denim exterior.

“I’m excited to share my invention with the world because I’ve been making these jeans for mates in exchange for some beers, but want to hire some smart hardworking kiwis to help really get this thing going and start shipping worldwide,” says the enthusiastic entrepreneur. . . 


Rural round-up

07/09/2021

B+LNZ remains unconvinced by low-slope map :

The Government’s new proposed low-slope map for stock exclusion is better than the original, however the map still won’t practically work on the ground, says Beef+Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ).

The Government is consulting on a revised map after the original mis-identified thousands of hectares of steep land across New Zealand as ‘low-slope’ and therefore requiring stock exclusion or fencing.

It is also consulting on a proposed certified freshwater farm planning approach. B+LNZ has released factsheets outlining key issues and guidance for farmers on both consultations and will be making submissions incorporating farmer feedback.

It will also be making a submission on the changes to the intensive winter grazing rules announced last week. . . 

NAIT  tackles lifestyles – Annette Scott:

Lifestylers have become a key focus for Ospri as it ups the efficiency of the national animal identification tracing (NAIT) programme.

Ospri head of traceability Kevin Forward says a lot of lifestyle properties now border farms and it’s important these property owners understand their responsibility when it comes to owning animals.

Real Estate New Zealand statistics show more than 7000 lifestyle properties change hands every year.

Whether you have a dozen animals or even just one, as person in charge of animals (PICA) there is a legal obligation to register with Nait and keep your account up-to-date if managing NAIT animals. . .

Careful paddock selection first step in winter forage crop programme :

Wintering practices have changed on Robert Young’s Southland farm over the past 10 years.

A continual process of fine-tuning the management of their winter forage crops to protect their soil and water resources is paying dividends, with less mud, reduced run-off and content livestock.

Robert and his family farm a 970ha rolling to steep sheep, beef and dairy support property near Gore.

Winter forage crops, namely fodder beet and swedes, are an important part of their farm system; both as part of their pasture renewal programme and to grow a bulk of quality feed for sheep and cattle over the depths of winter. . . 

AGL’s Nelson plant rolls out covid-19 vaccines :

Alliance Group Ltd’s Nelson plant is rolling out covid-19 vaccinations to staff and immediate family members within their “bubble”.

Sixty-nine workers and 10 of their family members received their first covid-19 vaccinations at the plant on Thursday in a joint initiative between Alliance and Te Piki Oranga Ltd, a local Māori healthcare provider. Approximately 40 employees at the plant have already been vaccinated.

Te Piki Oranga staff worked with the Nelson plant’s health and safety manager Sheryl Edwards to provide the immunisations at the plant. The second of the two vaccinations required will be provided at the plant in six weeks’ time.  . . 

FarmIQ appoints respected ago-leader as its new chairman:

FarmIQ is ‘bringing it all together’ with the announcement of Warren Parker as Chairman of its Board of Directors.

Warren brings a wealth of knowledge and experience in agricultural systems, farm management, and governance while also being experienced in working effectively with government.

His vision for FarmIQ in the next five years is founded on this experience and the increased market and compliance expectations placed on farmers, “It has all the ingredients and ambition necessary to become the national leading software choice for land managers in New Zealand and will have grown its presence internationally.”

FarmIQ can only achieve this by being a good partner, respectful collaborator and admired for its practicality but he says “there is a lot to do but I’m excited by the high caliber of their people and their enthusiasm to help farmers.” The power of a platform approach is other software providers can offer their tailored solutions while farmers need to enter data only once. This is well proven in the banking and other sectors, and there is no reason it cannot be just as successful in the rural sectors. . .

Beef giant Brazil halts China exports after confirming two mad cow disease cases – Nayara Figueiredo:

Brazil, the world’s largest beef exporter, has suspended beef exports to its No. 1 customer China after confirming two cases of “atypical” mad cow disease in two separate domestic meat plants, the agriculture ministry said on Saturday.

The suspension, which is part of an animal health pact agreed between China and Brazil and is designed to allow Beijing time to take stock of the problem, begins immediately, the ministry said in a statement. China will decide when to begin importing again, it added.

The suspension is a major blow for Brazilian farmers: China and Hong Kong buy more than half of Brazil’s beef exports.

The cases were identified in meat plants in the states of Mato Grosso and Minas Gerais, the ministry said. It said they were the fourth and fifth cases of “atypical” mad cow disease that have been detected in Brazil in 23 years. . . 


Rural round-up

07/07/2021

Farmers contribute much to NZ’s balance of payments and our standard of living – but some ministers don’t grasp this reality – Point of Order:

Global  prices for New Zealand products  from the  agricultural sector, as measured on the ANZ Commodity Price Index,  have risen for eight consecutive months to hit a  new  record in May.  Prices on the world index  are  up 18% this  year, or 17% in  local currency terms.

Some  economists are predicting more  rises  are  in  store  this  year.

The  gains  have  gone  some way in the  balance of  payments to offset big losses on  the  foreign  currency  front  from the overseas tourism and   international education sectors.

Westpac senior agri-economist Nathan Penny says being a food producer has been positive during Covid-19 as people still need to eat in times of crisis. . . 

EU biofuel goals likely behind major deforestation in last decade, report says

European Union targets to boost biofuel use are likely to have led to the deforestation of an area roughly the size of the Netherlands over the last decade to expand soy, palm and other oil crops, a report says.

About 4 million hectares of forests mainly in Southeast Asia and South America have been cleared since 2011 – including about 10 percent of remaining orangutan habitat, according to estimates by campaign group Transport and Environment (T&E).

That suggests efforts to replace polluting fuels such as diesel with biofuels are paradoxically increasing planet-warming carbon dioxide emissions, said Laura Buffet, T&E’s energy director.

“A policy that was supposed to save the planet is actually wrecking it,” she said. “We cannot afford another decade of this.” . . 

Primary industry heroes honoured by peers:

A collaboration that will reduce emissions and accelerate green hydrogen infrastructure, a company that has taken our honey to the world and an initiative to boost farmer mental wellbeing by taking them surfing have been recognised by their primary industry peers.

Food and fibre sector achievers were recognised at the 2021 Primary Industries New Zealand Awards dinner at the Air Force Museum of New Zealand in Christchurch last night, with seven winners named from 65 nominations.

A favourite with many of the more than 500 farmers, growers, foresters and fishers present was the winner of the Team Award, sponsored by BASF. Steven Thompson from Bayley’s Rural Real Estate started helping farmers get out on the ocean waves as a way to leave the stress of their busy roles behind them for a few hours. Surfing for Farmers now boasts a team of 50 volunteers and has spread to 16 regions, with nearly 3000 farmers taking part.

“For most farmers it is their first time on a surf-board. Steven says when farmers come out of the water, it’s like a reset for them,” judges noted…

Retaining farming’s voice – Paul Crick:

As farmers, we are skilled at managing what happens inside the farm gate; it is the externalities, the factors we cannot control, that can cause the greatest amount of stress.

There has been a paradigm shift in our sector. So, it is pleasing to see Beef+Lamb New Zealand’s renewed strategy reflecting this change.

Two of the organisation’s three priorities are “outside of the farm-gate”, namely championing the sector and increasing market returns. The third priority, supporting farming excellence, means they will continue to deliver extension and support farmers to run sustainable and profitable farming systems.

This strategy shows that the organisation will do the advocacy and market development work on farmers’ behalf.

Who’s eating New Zealand? – Farah Hancock:

If you imagine New Zealand’s sheep meat as a plate of 10 meatballs, Kiwis would get to eat half of a meatball. So where’s the rest going? In the first story in a new series, Farah Hancock crunches more than 30 years of data to find out who’s eating New Zealand.

New Zealand produces enough food to feed about 40 million people but given our population is just 5 million, who are these people we’re feeding and what are they eating?

And in the land of milk and honey, how much is left behind for Kiwis?

RNZ has looked at some of our biggest merchandise export earners and some of our highest profile products to see who has been eating and drinking New Zealand over the past 30 years. . . 

Cannasouth to buy out cultivation and manufacturing joint venture partners:

Leading medicinal cannabis company, Cannasouth Limited has today entered into two conditional agreements to acquire the balance of the stakes that it does not already own in its cultivation and manufacturing joint venture businesses.

Acquisition of outstanding interest in Cannasouth Cultivation Limited

Cannasouth has entered into a conditional agreement with Aaron Craig and his family interests (Craig Family Interests) to acquire the remaining 50% stake in Joint Venture business Cannasouth Cultivation Limited that Cannasouth does not already own.

Cannasouth Cultivation has built a state-of-the-art growing and processing facility that will produce medicinal cannabis flower biomass at highly competitive production cost. It is energy efficient and more environmentally sustainable than indoor cultivation operations. . . 

Large rural land holding teed up to sell:

A substantial rural land holding in one of Mangawhai’s high growth areas has been placed on the market for sale.

The 50.14 hectare farm, is located near the internationally renowned Tara Iti Golf Course, and within a short drive to the Mangawhai Central development and the area’s famous surf beach.

The property at 213 Black Swamp Road is being marketed for sale via a tender process (unless sold prior) on 21 July, by Bayleys Country property specialist John Barnett. . . 


Rural round-up

08/06/2021

Big rain, big pain, big cost – Canterbury’s week of flooding devastation – Martin van Beynen:

An intensively farmed region of Canterbury lying between the north branch of the Ashburton/Hakatere and Hinds rivers was one of the hardest-hit by this week’s floods. Reporter MARTIN VAN BEYNEN spent four days in the area assessing the impact.

Farmers in Mid-Canterbury knew it would be bad.

When the MetService issued a red alert for the Canterbury region on Friday, May 28, they prepared for some sleepless nights and a rough weekend.

The MetService warned that 200-300 millimetres of rain was expected to “accumulate” about the high country between 3pm on Saturday and 11am on Monday. The rain would cause dangerous river conditions and significant flooding, the agency said. . . 

Flood took my farm – Annette Scott:

The storm has eased and the carnage is emerging on Darryl Butterick’s flood-stricken Ashburton Forks property.

Farming deer, sheep and beef across two separate properties between the North and South branches of the Ashburton River, Butterick was smack bang in the middle, copping the breakout of both rivers.

“We got it right up the ass, that’s for sure,” Butterick said.

Two-thirds of his deer farm, carrying 500 hinds and sire stags, was under water. . . 

Farming leaders focus on Canty clean-up – Neal Wallace:

Offers of help are coming thick and fast for Canterbury flood victims, but farming leaders say they are still trying to collate exactly what is needed and where.

North Canterbury Federated Farmers president Caroline Amyes says much activity is happening behind the scenes.

“We are all working in the background to collaborate and to have a unified approach,” Amyes said.

The groups coordinating the response include Federated Farmers, Rural Support Trust, rural advisers, Civil Defence, Ministry of Primary Industries, the feed source hotline, Environment Canterbury, DairyNZ and Beef + Lamb NZ.

Amyes says the Rural Support Trust is collating needs and the Government’s $500,000 grant has enabled a co-ordinator to be employed to match offers with need and arrange logistics. . . 

Northland SNA plan: Kāeo residents up in arms at packed public meeting – Peter de Graaf:

A plan to designate more than 40 per cent of the Far North as Significant Natural Areas (SNAs) is a big disincentive to people who already look after their land, speaker after speaker told a packed public meeting in Kāeo.

More than 200 people turned out on Thursday evening to share their concerns about a proposed expansion of the district’s SNAs, a day after close to 500 people attended a similar meeting in Kawakawa.

Many of those at the Kāeo meeting said they already protected native bush by planting, pest control and fencing — but the SNA plan, which could limit use of their properties, had given them second thoughts.

Ahipara’s Danny Simms said he loved his land and didn’t need anyone to tell him to look after it. . . 

Global food prices rise at rapid rate in May:

Global food prices rose at their fastest monthly rate in more than a decade in May, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has reported.

The FAO Food Price Index averaged 127.1 points in May, 4.8% higher than in April and 39.7% higher than in May 2020.

A surge in the international prices of vegetable oils, sugar and cereals led the increase in the index to its highest value since September 2011 and only 7.6% below its all-time peak in nominal terms.

The FAO Cereal Price Index increased 6% from April, led by international maize prices, which averaged 89.9% above their value a year earlier. . .

A season of outstanding quality for New Zealand winegrowers:

After a smaller than usual harvest this year, New Zealand winemakers are excited about the excellent fruit and wine quality, though careful management of inventory is required to meet escalating global demand.

Spring was cooler than usual in 2021, with frosts occurring until unusually late in the season. This, combined with increasing costs of production, has made wine harvesting more difficult and expensive than usual.

The globally renowned wine-growing region of Marlborough was hit especially hard by these frosts. As an area famous for the quality of its wine – particularly Sauvignon Blanc -– this shortage of grapes has created a number of downstream implications for the wine industry, both here in New Zealand as well as internationally. . . 


Rural round-up

16/05/2021

Fonterra Shareholders’ Fund growth threat to farmer control even if they can’t vote: Chairman’ – Andrea Fox:

The Fonterra Shareholders’ Fund does not have voting rights in New Zealand’s biggest business, but it does have influence, which is a form of control, says chairman Peter McBride.

“The greater the size of the fund, the greater the level of influence it can bring to bear on the co-operative’s leadership.”

Fonterra farmer-shareholders and unitholders had different ideas about risk and value, he said. . . 

Nominations for rural business awards open:

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) and insurance company NZI have launched the NZI Rural Women NZ Business Awards for 2021.

RWNZ national president Gill Naylor says the awards are an opportunity to showcase the creativity and innovation of rural women entrepreneurs and the support they provide rural communities.

“Many small businesses have faced significant challenges as a result of the pandemic. This makes the opportunity to recognise and celebrate the resilience of women-owned and operated rural businesses all the more important. . .

Do animals need a varied diet – Jacqueline Rowarth:

A “varied diet” is in response to food availability and an attempt to restrain our own inclinations to indulge. Imposing this recent and muddled human concept on animals is inappropriate, Dr Jacqueline Rowarth writes.

Children like lollies. Not always, but generally. Sweet-free aisles at the supermarket are in place to avoid trouble.

Watch what happens at a children’s party and the energy foods will be eaten first – icecream, cake, chips. Not always, but generally.

In adulthood, doughnuts are a popular choice to meet the need, and research involving bagels has shown that the most popular choice has the combination of sugar for instant energy and fat for long-term calorie maximisation. . . 

Dedication behind trialling success – Alice Scott:

Next week, Greenvale will come alive as it plays host to the New Zealand Sheep Dog Trials. Alice Scott talked to keen triallist Scott Hunter as he prepares for a big week.

Dog trialling. The keen enthusiast will chew through quite a few diesel kilometres in the ute, consume a few cups of coffee while waiting for their run and sometimes, for those who hang around long enough, may enjoy a cold beverage later on. Just the one.

For those just starting out and with a partner or young family — it will also likely mean preparing said loved ones for the impending days or (God willing) weekends of absence, all the while seasoned wives tend to happily nod as they hatch out their own weekend of matrimonial bliss.

Scott Hunter’s name is often seen up on the leaderboard at many club trials around Otago and Southland. He has competed at 10 Island championships and 10 New Zealand championships. At 2019’s South Island championships in Hanmer Springs, he came away with two third placings. . . 

Farmers discuss the benefits of Southdowns – Shawn McAvinue:

A tour of Southern farms running Southdown sheep featured discussions about hogget lambing and the traits of the breed farmers must “protect at all costs”.

About 40 people from throughout the country attended the Southdown Sheep Society of New Zealand’s national southern tour last week.

Tour stops included Don Murray’s Riverside stud in Waitahuna, about 10km southeast of Lawrence. Southern Southdown Breeders Club member Roger Keach, of Waihola, started proceedings by quizzing the visitors.

“Who played at two test matches — All Blacks and New Zealand Kiwis — on the same day in Auckland in 1946?” Visitors pondered the question as Mr Murray introduced himself and talked about his system breeding Southdowns on his 550ha farm. . . 

 

Essential oil “without peer” offers bright future in spite of production challenges – Jamie Brown:

The quietly performing Aussie native lemon myrtle produces oil and dried leaf suitable for high-end culinary and medicinal purposes. Right now an eager global market is clamouring for more.

Newly formed Myrtle Trading Company purchased a farm at Wyrallah near Lismore with an existing orchard and now is in the process of expanding production and is keen to work with local farmers interested in producing lemon myrtle leaf. This week they hosted a training program, in conjunction with Ballina based North Coast Community College.

Students paid to study – and to plant trees – learning about organic methods of farming that include controlling the troublesome myrtle rust – a fungus that spots the leaves and reduces growth, marking them visually but not affecting the plant’s citronol-rich quality. . . 


Rural round-up

19/03/2021

B+LNZ’s reaction to the Government’s intensive winter grazing announcement:

B+LNZ chief executive Sam McIvor says it’s encouraging the Government has accepted some of the Southland winter grazing advisory group’s proposals, including supporting an industry-led Intensive Winter Grazing (IWG) module to farm plans in the coming year, and the delayed implementation of the winter grazing rules.

Minister O’Connor made the point to our Annual Meeting that more time is needed to work through the Southland group’s recommendations and to write robust policy as a result. We welcome this commitment to getting it right and look forward to working with the Government on this process.

“B+LNZ has been an integral part of the industry front-footing action on the ground. Our belief has always been that industry-led, tested and practical solutions achieve better results than arbitrary rules.

“B+LNZ led the development of the IWG module, and this module is already part of the B+LNZ farm plan launched today and which is being rolled out in the coming weeks as part of our commitment to supporting resilient, profitable farming businesses while achieving positive and lasting environmental outcomes. . .

Rural health workers decline Covid-19 vaccine due to ‘hours of travel’ – Rowan Quinn:

Some rural doctors, nurses and frontline health workers are turning down their first chance of getting a Covid vaccine because they would have to take hours out of their busy day to get one..

They fear it is a signal for what is to come for the wider rural community.

Whangamata doctor and Rural GPs Network chair Fiona Bolden said frontline health staff in the Coromandel have had the call up to get their first vaccination.

Some had not been able to take it up because they would have to make a return journey to Hamilton to get it, and do that again for the second dose three weeks later . . .

Pastoral lease reform back to the future? – Catherine Irons, Mike Britton, Allan Brent:

Will the Crown Pastoral Land Reform Bill achieve its objectives or will it turn the clock back, reviving old tensions

The Crown Pastoral Land Reform Bill, currently before Parliament, will end the 30-year programme called tenure review. Tenure review allows pastoral leaseholders to separate the land they lease from the Crown into two types: farmland where the farm is owned by them freehold and conservation land held by the Crown.

If the Bill becomes law, remaining pastoral leases will continue but with stronger rules limiting the changes leaseholders might make to their farming methods.

We are members of a newly established non-governmental organisation, the Environmental Law Initiative, and we think this Bill will in fact create greater problems in a climate-changed future. . . .

Saving Dolly – Owen Jennings:

The cow has become a much maligned beast of late.  She makes our rivers unswimmable, puts nitrogen in our drinking water, pugs the ground causing erosion and farts and belches poisonous Greenhouse Gases into the atmosphere.  No wonder people don’t want to eat her bountiful products anymore.

Of course, most of that, if not all, is blatantly untrue but it makes for selling copy, keeping well paid academics in their job and the green lobby groups’ coffers filled.

Take the bit about farting and belching.  The story goes that cows emit Methane as they chew their cud.  Methane is a potent Greenhouse Gas.  Greenhouse Gases trap heat in the atmosphere and warm our planet.  The story concludes it is going to get so hot we are all going to die.  Leaves Baldacci and Grisham in the dust.

Now for some balance.  Farms use huge amounts of CO2.  Dr Bradley Case at AUT found farms take in about 90% of the Greenhouse Gas they emit in the woody vegetation and trees alone on the farm. That’s not counting the grass which uses even more CO2 in photosynthesis.  Farms are a net sink. . . 

Native plants can boost crop yields new study shows – Hugo Cameron:

New research shows fruit and vegetable growers can utilise native bush to increase yields and protect plants from pests.

The Plant and Food Research study found having more native plants near crops could attract insects that help with pollination and combat some harmful pests.

Figures from the Ministry for Primary Industries showed insect-pollinated crops such as kiwifruit and avocados were worth about $2 billion to the national economy. . .

Foot and Mouth: hoping that painful lessons have been learnt :

SIR, – Your recent articles commemorating the 20th anniversary of the 2001 foot-and-mouth (FMD) outbreak brought back some bitter and heartbreaking memories for my family.

We had not been farming for long here and were in the process of building up a pedigree flock of 1000 Lleyn ewes when disaster struck as a result of a single ram being purchased at Longtown on that fateful day, February 22, resulting in the entire flock along with my wife’s cherished, prize-winning flock of Jacobs as well as some rare breeds being culled.

The irony for us was that not only was the ram and our flock never infected with the disease, but the nearest outbreak to us was more than 40 miles away

 


Rural round-up

13/12/2020

Totara could be part of the water quality answer:

Tōtara oil and milk might seem strange companions – but a project currently under way could one day see both become products emanating from dairy farms.

The pairing is just one option that could stem from a project looking at productive riparian buffers – native and/or exotic planting that can not only promote better water quality in New Zealand waterways but also create new income streams for farmers.

“We know riparian planting benefits the environment by reducing nutrient losses into farm waterways,” says Electra Kalaugher, senior land and water management specialist at DairyNZ. “However, riparian planting can often mean a loss of productive land for farmers.

“Productive riparian buffers are different – and the project is exploring new and existing plant product options and their ability to deliver environmental, social, cultural and financial benefits.” .

Top RWNZ award for shearer – Annette Scott:

A competitive and world record-holding shearer, Sarah Higgins’ passion for shearing has earned her a top award at the NZI Rural Women NZ 2020 Business Awards. She talked with Annette Scott.

SARAH Higgins’ Marlborough-based shearing business breaks all the stereotypes of how a shearing crew might look and behave.

“We strive to break through the status quo of the shearing industry,” Higgins said.

And, it was her passion and commitment to harness her love of the land that has her Higgins Shearing business now firmly rooted in its local community. . . 

 

Farming through the generations – Colin Williscroft:

Members of Guy Bell’s family have been farming in Hawke’s Bay for five generations, with his sons making it six. Colin Williscroft reports.

The Bells are a family that farms four properties across Hawke’s Bay, from the Central Hawke’s Bay coast to the foothills of the Ruahines.

Guy Bell is the fifth generation of his family on his mother’s side to farm in the area, and the second on his father’s side.

He has two brothers and a sister who also farm in the district. . . 

Cut flower farming grew after few seeds planted – Mark Price:

Anna Mackay, of Spotts Creek Station in the Cardrona Valley, has diversified into cut flowers. She described to Mark Price her experiences so far.

During a family holiday in Matakana a few years back, I purchased a book called The Cut Flower Garden by Erin Benzakein, of Floret Farms, in the United States, and I was totally inspired by her story.

In my past life, I have owned a florist’s shop, have been heavily involved with interior design, worked alongside Annabel Langbein as her prop stylist during her ‘‘free-range cook series’’ and, in later years, operated an event-styling company, Barefoot Styling, with good friend Sarah Shore.

When the younger of our two sons started school in September 2016 I wanted to slow my life down. . . 

Sowing the seeds of success :

Rangiora’s Luisetti Seeds’ warehouses, seed clearing facilities and silos are a constant reminder to locals of the town’s long agricultural history.

The family business was established by Vincent Luisetti in 1932 and while it may be 88 years old, the company is in expansion-mode and is investing in state-of-the art seed cleaning technology.

Edward Luisetti, Vincent’s grandson and Luisetti Seeds managing director says the company is in the process of installing the highest capacity ryegrass and cereal seed cleaning facility outside of America. It will be located in Ashburton.

The machinery has been purchased from Germany and initially, Covid delays put a spanner in the works. . . 

Are cows getting a bad rap when it comes to climate change? – Stu McNish:

A leading climate scientist, Myles Allen, believes the effect of cattle on climate change has been overstated.

“The traditional way of accounting for methane emissions from cows overstates the impact of a steady herd by a factor of four.”

That’s a problem, says Allen. “If we are going to set these very ambitious goals to stop global warming, then we need to have accounting tools that are fit for purpose. … The errors distort cows’ contributions — both good and bad — and, in doing so, give CO2 producers a free pass on their total GHG contribution.”

Allen is a heavyweight in climate circles. The BBC described him as the physicist behind Net Zero. In 2005, he proposed global carbon budgets and in 2010, he received the Appleton medal and prize from the Institute of Physics for his work in climate sciences. . .


Rural round-up

11/12/2020

Dairy farmer confidence is improving but there are challenges in export markets – Point of Order:

The dairy industry  has  recovered some  of  its  confidence, as  its  role  as the  backbone  of  NZ’s  export structure has  moved  into sharper  relief  in the  Covid-19  pandemic.

Rabobank’s  latest quarterly survey of  farmer confidence says  it  has improved from  minus 32%  to minus 23%, with  demand  for  NZ dairy products  holding up well  since the  previous survey  in September.

The  dairy  industry  over  past  seasons   has  been the  target  of  urban critics  for  so-called   “dirty dairying”, climate  change  warriors  who want a reduction in methane emissions,  and the  government, which is implementing  new  freshwater regulations. Internally the industry was  stricken  with  the  financial  woes   of   Fonterra.

Even  now  as the  industry absorbs the evidence  for greater  confidence,  it   is  not  without  strategic  concerns.  . . 

Fonterra’s new ‘carbon zero milk’  50 Shades of Green:

Reading this week about the launch of Fonterra’s ‘Five anchor milks are now carbon zero’ we learned that this product claim would be achieved by gaining off-sets through funding a solar farm in India and a wind farm in New Caledonia.

In our opinion the embracing of the ETS and the use of off-setting is being used simply as a greenwashing marketing tool and duping New Zealanders who perhaps don’t understand the nuance of offsetting on our country.

It’s the ETS and off-setting mentality that is currently ruining our rural communities, replacing good productive farms and displacing people that live and work there with carbon pine forests, that will, far from being a solution, grow old, rot and burn. A disaster of our own short sighted making. . . 

Survey confirms value of farm environment plans:

Recently released fantastic survey results from farmers in the Aparima catchment in Southland confirm the value of farm environment plans, Invercargill MP and National’s associate Agriculture spokesperson Penny Simmonds says.

The survey was of 151 dairy and sheep and beef farmers in the Aparima Community Environment project who are committed to addressing water quality issues and reducing their environmental footprint.

“The survey results confirm what National has been promoting – that farmer-led action and working with scientists and industry experts is most effective, not the over prescriptive, unworkable regulations such as what the Labour Government has put in place,” Ms Simmonds says. . .

Farmer bank pressure drops but so do satisfaction rates :

Fewer farmers are feeling undue pressure from their bank but satisfaction rates continue to slide, according to the Federated Farmers November Banking Survey.

Of the 1,341 farmers who responded to the survey independently run by ResearchFirst, 65.4% said they were satisfied or very satisfied with their bank relationship. That’s down from 68.5% from the Feds’ survey in May.

“Satisfaction has steadily slipped over the past three years – in our November 2017 survey it was 80.8%,” Federated Farmers President and commerce spokesperson Andrew Hoggard said . . 

Seeka forecasts higher underlying earnings :

Strong sales, cost savings and significant one-off gains has seen kiwifruit exporter Seeka lift and narrows its full-year profit guidance.

The company expects underlying earnings between $15 million and $17m, compared with its previous guidance of between $9m and $12m

In a statement to the stock exchange, the company said the update reflected an improvement in its operational earnings, cost savings and the gain it expects from the sale and lease back of its Australian kiwifruit orchards. . .

Heartland launches farm term loan with self-serve online application:

Challenger bank Heartland has added another product to its growing list of digital offerings – this time for the rural market.

The term loan, called Sheep & Beef Direct, is designed for established farmers who are looking to buy or refinance a sheep or beef farm. In launching this product, Heartland is testing the appetite for a low-touch, online application that farmers can complete whenever and wherever – and they’ll be given an initial decision then and there.

Sheep & Beef Direct is the most recent of Heartland’s digital lending offerings. Joining the likes of Heartland’s Open for Business loans, car loans and home loans, it offers an online application which can be completed in minutes. . . 

 

 


Rural round-up

29/10/2020

Dairy industry short hundreds of staff

The dairy industry says despite a big push to try and attract locals, it is still hundreds of staff short this season.

Dairy NZ chief executive Tim Mackle said there were about 800 vacancies farmers were still looking to fill. The busy calving period had been challenging and exhausting for those who were unable to plug gaps, he said.

Mackle said a government-backed GoDairy course launched in May to attract and upskill locals did help, but like many in the primary sector, it had not seen as much demand for work as was expected.

“GoDairy was designed during the first Covid-19 lockdown in April when unemployment was expected to reach upwards of nine percent, if not higher, by late 2020. . . 

Is food too cheap? What makes up the price of your fruit and vegetables – Dr Helen Darling:

Warnings of an acute shortage of workers to harvest food crops in New Zealand are growing. But the problem – and potential solution – are more complex than they may seem, and give rise to the question: ‘Is food too cheap?’ Food Truth’s Dr Helen Darling considers the issues.

Spring brings hope on the orchard; trees burst to life with blossom signalling a good crop, however, the usual horticultural fears of frost, rain and hail have been joined this year by a significant shortfall of orchard workers.

The situation is not new, but it is usually addressed by the influx of seasonal workers from the Pacific Islands. This year is different, of course, because closed borders mean fewer workers are now available. Commentators (and there have been many) claim orchard workers are paid too little, and Kiwis are too lazy to do the work. The reality, however, is that it is not that simple and it raises the rather interesting question of who is responsible for our end-to-end food system? . . 

Helping the meat industry nurture female talent – Sally Rae:

When Ashley Gray was studying communications in Auckland, she dreamed of working for a large, “glossy” public relations agency.

The last thing on the self-described city girl’s mind was a job in the meat industry and yet, fast forward a few years, and she wears multiple “hats” within the sector.

Among those roles is chairwoman of the New Zealand chapter of Meat Business Women, a professional networking initiative founded in the United Kingdom by Laura Ryan in 2015.

The New Zealand meat sector and Meat Business Women recently signed an agreement aimed at boosting the number of women in the industry . . 

Growers employment expo in Hawke’s Bay

Hawke’s Bay growers are facing their most challenging season, with about 10,000 workers needed between November and April for thinning, picking, packing and processing the region’s world renowned produce.

COVID-19 has severely impacted the availability of overseas workers so the industry is looking for local heroes to help.

Hastings Mayor Sandra Hazlehurst says we feed the country and the world with our produce and the industry needs everyone’s help in these unprecedented times.

“More than 8,000 local people are permanently employed in Hawke’s Bay in and around the horticulture and viticulture sectors, from pack-houses to the port. However these jobs are at risk if the fruit is not picked. . . 

Woolhandler wins two major titles at Waimate – Yvonne O’Hara:

Amber Poihipi is passionate about the wool industry and wool handling.

That passion contributed to her success when she won both the New Zealand Spring Championship and South Island Circuit senior woolhandling finals at Waimate.

Based in Winton, Ms Poihipi has been working for Shear Tech Ltd owners Ray Te Whata and Matt Watson for about a year.

She has been in the industry full-time for 14 years, and has worked throughout New Zealand and also spent six years in Australia, as well as several months in the United States, grading wool in a mobile woolshed.

“It was very different working out there in a trailer, and we graded into short, long, strong and coloured wools and we didn’t skirt,” she said. . . 

The farmers trying to  save the world and how you can help :

Farmers are using innovative methods, on their farms and further afield, to reduce their environmental impact. Some are creating products you may not know about, others are using techniques and technology designed to slash their carbon footprint. Just how far has environmentally friendly farming come, and what questions should you be asking about how your food is produced?

Slashing food waste

Fruit farmer Charlie Fermor has two main environmental focuses: to reduce food waste and find the most environmentally-friendly packaging for his farm. And he’s found ways to do both.

“We’ve always tried to be as efficient as possible on the farm, and reducing waste is probably the biggest part of that.” . . 


Too much weather

29/09/2020

 

It’s more than a wee bit breezy in North Otago and was so cold this morning water from the k-line irrigators turned to frost.

Further south:


Rural round-up

20/08/2020

Some farmers can’t access stock due to Auckland border restrictions – Sarah robson:

Farmers with properties either side of Auckland’s southern border are frustrated they haven’t been able to check stock or get essential supplies because of the alert level 3 lockdown.

Travel in to, out of and through Auckland is heavily restricted, with only a limited number of exemptions.

Federated Farmers Auckland president Alan Cole said that was causing headaches for farmers with properties in both Auckland and Waikato.

“They are unable to get to them,” he said.

“You need to be able to get to your stock basically every day or every second day to feed out, check them. Some of the guys are calving at the moment and they’ve got properties on either side of the boundary.” . . 

COVID-19: Let the small guys stay open — Feds – Sudesh Kissun:

Calls are growing for the Government to allow butchers and independent fruit and vegetable retailers to operate under COVID-19 Alert Levels.

Federated Farmers is the latest industry lobby calling for the Government to reconsider and let small fresh food sellers stay open under level 3 and, if necessary, at level 4.

New Zealand’s first COVID-19 lockdown rules meant butchers, bakers and greengrocers could not open as the small retailers were considered non-essential.

But Feds president Andrew Hoggard is pleading with the Government to “let the little guys stay open”. . . 

Meeting leads to productive relationship – Kerrie Waterworth:

A Wanaka farmer and sheep breeder who has developed wool for some of the world’s most sought-after Covid-19  face masks is already thinking of new value-added ways to use coarse wool in other industries. Kerrie Waterworth reports.

Five  years ago Andy Ramsden was looking for a home for a new type of wool from his trademarked Astino breed.

At a presentation in Queenstown by a New York consultancy firm on the state of the New Zealand wool industry he met the chief executive of Auckland-based air filter producer Lanaco, Nick Davenport.

Mr Ramsden said they sat down for a quick cup of coffee and stood up four hours later. . . 

Velvet trumps venison – Sally Rae:

It is a tale of two halves in the deer industry as venison schedule prices drop to their lowest level in more than a decade while consumer demand for velvet remains robust.

ANZ’s latest Agri Focus report said venison markets were “extremely challenging”; venison was highly exposed to the European restaurant trade and the industry was scrambling to move more products into the retail space to reduce reliance on the food service sector.

Farmgate prices for deer might have “ticked up a tad” recently but prices had not been at such low levels for more than a decade.

“It is a real blow for an industry that was doing so well and had appeared to have moved away from the volatile cycles of boom and bust that have long plagued the industry,” the report said. . .

NZ food industry benefits from leading-edge portable drying technology:

When Robert Barnes was asked by a friend to build a dryer to dehydrate macadamia nuts 25 years ago, he never thought it would be the start of his own drying machine business.

Robert, an electrician and refrigeration engineer by trade, set up his own refrigeration and air-conditioning company in 1989, attracting Port of Tauranga as one of his clients. Since 1995 he has also been using his skills to develop highly innovative Rexmoi® Dryers. He sold the refrigeration and air conditioning business five years ago to focus solely on Drying Solutions Ltd.

Now Robert is gearing up to exhibit a Rexmoi® Dryer, at his fourth Foodtech Packtech show next month. . . 

Cow’s milk greener than vegan alternatives :

Cows’ milk from grass-based systems is environmentally friendlier than plant-based alternatives because it uses far less soya, according to a new study.

It says vegans and others who buy milk substitutes made from soya for their latte and cappuccino, or breakfast cereal, are harming the planet. The study, published in the Journal of Applied Animal Nutrition, says consumers’ ever-increasing demand for soya meal and palm kernel meal is fuelling the destruction of rainforest.

The authors calculate that about 85 litres of milk is produced in the UK for every kilo of soya bean meal consumed by dairy cows. . . 


Rural round-up

02/05/2020

Ongoing drought is bleeding us dry – Rhea Dasent:

We are living through exceptional times, and the drought of 2020 is one of the exceptions – and not in a good way.

Businesses affected by the coronavirus lockdown understand how farmers feel about the drought.

Being unable to trade due to external influences puts you not just on the back foot, but several feet behind, for the rest of the year or even longer.

Tourism businesses rely on a good summer with lots of customers in order to have the income to get through the low winter season. Farmers have good and bad seasons too, and hope that it all evens out.

But the lockdown and this drought have taken the usual seasonal ups and downs to a whole new level. . . 

Overseas markets holding up – Allan Barber:

In a recent conversation, Alliance CEO David Surveyor described world red meat markets by comparing them to traffic lights. Contrary to the evidence earlier in the year, when buyers stopped buying because of Chinese New Year closely followed by the Covid-19 shutdown, China has emerged as the brightest light with the traffic lights firmly set on green. The composition of Chinese orders has changed since the virus outbreak with retail and online sales growing considerably, while there are signs of hot pot outlets starting to reopen.

Silver Fern Farms’ Simon Limmer agrees with this assessment, although he cautions against assuming there won’t be a risk of a market reversal at some point. For the time being China is a saviour, in spite of meat exporters’ wish not to put too many eggs in the same basket. This is not a time to pick and choose though. The rest of Asia is also quite strong with demand for grass fed beef holding up well in Japan, Korea, Taiwan and South East Asia. . .

Changing patterns in food supply must be addressed – Anna Campbell:

I have been reading and listening to reports and podcasts on the impact of Covid-19 on food supply and buying patterns.

It is interesting to note that most of these trends were identified as trends before Covid-19, but the pandemic has massively shifted the dial in terms of the pace of change. We are likely to see many of these shifts sustained in the Covid-19 recovery and beyond.

1. In the United States, Covid-19 has increased the dominance of the large food players such as Walmart and Amazon (which owns Whole Foods). Small grocery chains and independents, before Covid-19, made up 40% of the grocery sector — this is rapidly shrinking. Workers within the large chains are negotiating higher pay and, in general, profit margins on grocery products are decreasing. This will make it harder for small players to compete, especially without the benefits of robotics and artificial intelligence systems. . . 

Four Dairy Women’s Network Regional Leader finalists:

Grassroots dairy farming leadership efforts from throughout New Zealand are represented by the four finalists in the Dairy Women’s Network new DWN Regional Leader of the Year award.

The finalists are spread from the north of the North Island where Sue Skelton is farming south west of Whangarei near Waiotira to Jessica Goodwright who is sharemilking in Drummond in Central Southland.

Mid-Canterbury farmer and personal development coach Tania Burrows and North Canterbury contract milker Rebecca Green are the other two finalists that represent over 70 volunteer Dairy Women’s Network Regional Leaders spread throughout the country. . .

High yields in difficult season a credit to NZ’s arable farmers:

Yields for the 2020 harvest are up 16 percent across the board when compared to 2019, the latest Arable Industry Marketing Initiative (AIMI) survey shows.

Particularly encouraging was the fact fewer hectares were planted in total this season compared to last (98,090 ha vs 104,000) yet tonnes harvested were substantially up (873,080 vs 796,700), Federated Farmers Vice-Chairperson Grains, Brian Leadley, said.

“This is in despite of a severe early season hailstorm, flooding in some regions and some pretty variable weather.  It just highlights that our arable farmers are world class,” Brian said. . .

Muttonbird hunters expect prices to go up as season cut short by lockdown – Te Aniwa Hurihanganui:

Eager muttonbird hunters are hoping to get a flight out to the Tītī / Muttonbird Islands as soon possible, with alert level 3 now opening a small window of opportunity to gather the delicious tītī before the season is over.

Muttonbirds are in hot demand every year, but with alert level 4 putting the season on hold, hunters now have just two weeks before the birds leave the island in early May.

Tony McColgan from Invercargill usually collects up to 2000 birds a year; he thought the season was over when the lockdown began. . . 

Investing in cows grows wealth in dairy – Samantha Townsend:

It might have taken the Nicholsons 30 years to put their name on the mortgage but it was an investment well worth the wait for the next generation.

Megan and Geoff Nicholson started their dairy journey as lease farmers in 1989 having moved back to her home town of Taree from the United Kingdom where they met.

Geoff was from a beef, sheep and cropping farm but neither of us had particular dairy experience but we decided to give it go and loved it ,” Mrs Nicholson said. . . 

 


Rural round-up

09/01/2020

Farmer fears M Bovis back on property despite culling of 700 cattle

A Southland farmer is concerned the Mycoplasma bovis disease could be back on his farm, 18 months after his previous cattle herd had to be culled.

The disease can cause mastitis, pneumonia, arthritis, and late-term abortions.

Ben Walling and Sarah Flintoft had 1700 cattle culled after M bovis was discovered on their farm which was later declared disease-free.

Afterwards, they told RNZ they hoped they would never have to go through such an ordeal again. . . 

Kiwifruit seeks social license – Richard Rennie:

The term social licence to operate could be discarded as yet another slick marketing phrase but it is the guardrail that will keep New Zealand’s primary sector front and centre of this country’s continuing economic growth.

Richard Rennie spoke to Kellogg scholar and Kiwifruit Growers Incorporated communications manager Mike Murphy about his research on social licence and the kiwifruit sector.

Trust is probably the best descriptor when trying to define social licence to operate, a term that i relatively new to the primary sector, Kellogg scholar and Kiwifruit Growers Incorporated communications manager Mike Murphy says. . .

Shed upgrade cuts milking time :

Matamata goat farmers Wiebe and Piety Smitstra have retrofitted their goat milking shed with a GEA WestfaliaSurge low line double-up herringbone system.

The system, including automatic cup removers, milk meters and DairyPlan software, have contributed to worthwhile efficiency gains, say the Smitstras.

They have ‘gained’ two extra hours per day and the ability to identify their top performing goats for breeding. . .

Green tea instead of sulphur – Tessa Nicholson:

A Marlborough winery is attempting to replace sulphur dioxide (SO2) from their organic Sauvignon Blanc with green tea.

SO2 is a preservative that’s widely used in winemaking for its antioxidant and antibacterial properties. In terms of wine, adding it helps prevent oxidation, ensuring the wine stays fresh. In recent years the use of SO2 has come under scrutiny as some consumers say they react to wines that contain it. Reactions range from allergy effects, such as runny nose, itchy throat, skin rashes to asthma attacks. The number of producers not wanting to add sulphites is increasing world-wide and the orange wine movement has grown exponentially on the back of this. . .

Record attempt abandoned – Adam Burns:

A Central Otago shearer’s bid for a world record was abandoned after a few hours near Ranfurly on Saturday.

Stacey Te Huia, of Alexandra, was aiming to break a nine-hour merino wethers record of 418 set by Canterbury shearer Grant Smith in 1999.

The attempt was originally scheduled for December 7, but was postponed because the weight would not have been met.

Mr Te Huia started at 5am needing an average of about 47 an hour to break the record. . .

Hot cows affect reproduction – Greg Jarratt:

Heat stress has a big effect on reproduction, explains Greg Jarratt, vet and director of Matamata Veterinary Services.

One of the biggest headaches faced by NZ farmers is reproductive failure where in a herd six–week in calf rates fall and empty rates climb.

This translates to a major hit to the businesses bottom line due to lower production and more involuntary culling.

For this reason, many farmers consistently devote significant resources and efforts towards optimising reproductive performance and regularly review their reproductive performance and policies.


Rural round-up

25/06/2019

Farmers have a tough time ahead let’s stand with them – Tom O’Connor:

The message from environment campaigner Guy Salmon of the need to adapt farming operations to avoid an eventual environmental catastrophe is not new.

It has been repeated many times in many ways by a growing number of far sighted people for several decades. For most of that time many of these people have been pilloried and ridiculed by those with vested interests or others who refused or were unable to understand the consequences of accelerated climate change.       

When Salmon told a conference of the Waikato Small Milk and Supply Herds Group at Lake Karapiro recently, unlike previous generations of dairy farmers, many of those in attendance would have been well aware of what he was talking about and the situation they face but unsure how to prepare for it. . . 

Farm credits on table – Neal Wallace:

The Government is considering letting farmers use riparian planting and shelter belts to offset their greenhouse gas emissions.

To qualify now, vegetation must meet area, height and canopy cover criteria which primary sector leaders claim favours plantation forestry and ignores the carbon sequestering function of most farmland.

Livestock and horticulture sector representatives have been lobbying the Government to broaden the definition, saying New Zealand needs every available tool to meet the goal of being carbon neutral by 2050 . . .

OIO review brought forward a year – Neal Wallace:

The Government has brought forward by a year a review into the screening of foreign forestry investors in response to concerns from rural leaders that large-scale tree planting is destroying communities.

The review was to be started by October next year but Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor has confirmed it has already started and will look at the impact of Government changes to the Overseas Investment Act to identify any areas of concern.

The changes streamlined the vetting by the Overseas Investment Office of foreign forestry companies to reflect the fact about 75% of forest companies operating in New Zealand are owned by offshore entities. . . 

Leading food industry figures point to a positive future for New Zealand red meat:

Listen to the episode of Let’s Talk Food NZ podcast feature discussion panel HERE. Download images of the event HERE.

Last night, an expert panel made up of scientists and food industry experts were tasked with tackling the challenging question; Does New Zealand-produced red meat have a role in a healthy and sustainable diet?

Hosted by the Northern Club in Auckland in front of a crowd of food writers, nutritionists, dietitians and other interested parties, the panel covered a range of topics addressing whether we can meet the nutritional needs of exponential population growth, whilst working within the sustainable limits of planetary health.

The discussion was facilitated by NZ Herald journalist and editor-at-large of the Healthy Food Guide, Niki Bezzant who was joined by Dr Denise Conroy, Senior Scientist at Plant & Food Research; Dr Mike Boland, Principle Scientist at the Riddet Institute; Dr Mark Craig, a Auckland-based GP advocating a whole food, plant-based diet; Jeremy Baker, Chief Insights Officer for Beef + Lamb New Zealand Ltd; and Angela Clifford, CEO of Eat New Zealand. . . 

Ballance partners with Hiringa for Kapuni hydrogen project – Gavin Evans

(BusinessDesk) – Ballance Agri-Nutrients is to develop 16 MW of wind generation at its Kapuni site as part of a plan to produce renewable hydrogen there.

The fertiliser maker has partnered with Hiringa Energy to develop the $50 million project at its site in southern Taranaki.

Up to four large wind turbines would provide a 100 percent renewable power supply for the existing plant and to power a series of electrolysers to produce high-purity hydrogen, either for feedstock for the plant or to supply zero-emission trucking fuel. . .

 

Open letter to the non-agricultural community – John Gladigau:

Hi

We need to talk.

Firstly – apologies to you, because we are not always that good at doing this. We all too easily get defensive, up in arms and occasionally confrontational when we are challenged, accused or criticised. The thing is, we get a little sick of being called uneducated and ignorant when we have a lifetime of experience and many of us have qualifications which are similar to (or even exceed) our city cousins. It hurts us when people tells us we are cruel to animals, don’t care for the future of the planet and are blasé about food safety whereas for the majority of us the opposite is true. It frustrates us when people with little agricultural knowledge or experience lecture us on social media about the dangers of chemicals, our contribution to a changing climate, soil health, genetic modification and more when we have spent a lifetime working in, studying, experiencing and developing strategies to not only benefit our businesses, families and communities – but also those we produce for that we don’t even know. . . 

 


Rural round-up

29/03/2019

Agricultural sector productivity growth – Michael Reddell:

In the last few weeks, presumably simply by coincidence, I’ve had various comments and emails about productivity growth in the agricultural sector.    The most recent one finally prompted me to dig out the official data and check that my impressions were still supported by the data.  They were.    Agricultural sector productivity growth was very strong, but has been much more subdued for some time now.

There are two main measures of agricultural sector productivity: labour productivity (in effect, output per hour of labour input) and multi-factor productivity (in effect, the residual after what can be attributed to growth in labour and capital inputs has been deducted). In principle, MFP is superior.  In practice, estimates rely more heavily on the assumptions used in the calculation (although –  diverting briefly –  to the various readers who have sent me a recent piece by GMO on TFP/MFP, I reckon there is less to that critique than the authors claim). . . 

No trade wobbles in China for Fonterra – Paul McBeth:

 (BusinessDesk) – Fonterra Cooperative Group hasn’t faced any issues getting its products into China, where its business hit some speed wobbles when the butter market slowed.

The world’s biggest dairy exporter counts China as one of its most important markets and has been a beneficiary of a burgeoning middle class in the world’s most populous nation. . . 

Lamb exports climb to record levels:

Lamb exports reached record levels in February 2019, bumping up overall meat exports to a new monthly high, Stats NZ said today.

Lamb exports were $391 million in February 2019, a new record for any month. The previous high was in May 2018 ($367 million).

This month’s rise was driven by higher prices, as quantity was little changed from May last year. . . 

Apiculture New Zealand supports Minister’s call for unity:

Apiculture New Zealand supports the Minister for Agriculture’s plea for greater unity to address existing challenges around bee welfare and biosecurity, food safety and export regulations, and welcomes the Minister’s commitment to supporting the industry.

This follows a meeting by Apiculture New Zealand with the Minister late last week on the commodity levy results.

“As we advised the Minister a ‘no vote’ for the commodity levy means we do not have the investment fund needed, nor the collective focus that is characteristic of other primary industries in identifying, deciding and actioning priorities,” says Bruce Wills Chair of Apiculture New Zealand. . . 

First charter ship carrying Zespri Kiwifruit sets sail for China and Japan:

The first charter vessel carrying Zespri SunGold Kiwifruit is heading to China and Japan following this season’s early start to harvest.

The Southampton Star departed from Tauranga Harbour yesterday evening carrying approximately 3,000 pallets of Bay of Plenty-grown SunGold Kiwifruit bound for Shanghai and Kobe. The vessel had earlier berthed in Gisborne where it picked up 1,600 pallets of SunGold Kiwifruit, marking the start of what promises to be another bumper crop. . . 

Dates set for the 2019 NZ Young Viticulturist of the Year:

The Bayer NZ Young Viticulturist of the Year Competition is now in its fourteenth year and to take out the coveted title has become a key goal for many young viticulturists in New Zealand.

The programme aims to grow the wine industry’s future leaders, by stretching them, putting them out of their comfort zone and creating new relationships. It is a fantastic opportunity for Young Vits (30 yrs or under) to upskill, grow in confidence, widen their network and start making a name for themselves within the industry. . . 


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