Rural round-up

16/06/2021

Farmers, builders keen for EVs but right vehicles not for sale :

Farmers and tradies say the government’s clean car package is an unfair tax on them as no alternatives are available for their work vehicles.

From next month, people buying new or used imported electric vehicles or plug-in hybrids will be eligible for a rebate.

But from next year fees of up to $5875 will need to be paid on new combustion-engine vehicles depending on their emissions.

A Toyota Hilux, for example, could incur a fee of almost $3000. . .

Biting the hand:

Be careful.”

That’s the response by National’s Rural Communities spokesperson Barbara Kuriger to Sunday’s unveiling of the Government’s electric vehicle rebate scheme.

Under the new Clean Car package scheme, rebates of $8625 will be given to buyers of imported new electric and plug-in hybrids from July 1. Used EV buyers will receive $3450. The discounts only apply to vehicles costing $80,000 or less, with a minimum 3-star safety rating.

Meanwhile buyers of higher emission vehicles like utes will be taxed from January. . . 

Robots aiding expansion of innovative apple company:

Introduction of world-leading robotic technology is one of the driving forces behind a New Zealand apple exporter’s expansion.

Rockit Global, which exports snack-sized apples packed into handy tubes for on-the-go consumption to more than 30 countries, unveiled its new state-of-the-art apple packhouse in Hastings earlier this month.

Alongside its 120 permanent staff and 300 seasonal contractors, four H&C apple tube filling machines which each contain three robots, automate the picking and packing of apples into Rockit’s signature tube packaging.

The robots were custom designed by global food processing technology company, MHM Automation. . .

Research and trails taking fodder beet to the next level – Mary-Jo Tohill:

It is a bright crisp autumn day in North Otago, and the fodder beet crop waves gently in the breeze.

Behind it stands Dr Jim Gibbs, an Australian vet and university lecturer from Canterbury. He has devoted much of his career to fodder beet’s establishment as a winter grazing crop in New Zealand, and debunked myths about its toxicity to the international farming world.

He was guest speaker at the recent Catalyst Performance Agronomy field day at Altavady farm near Oamaru, one of dozens he attends every year.

The sometimes controversial root crop has taken Dr Gibbs on quite a journey. . . 

Chief executive of LIC to step down:

Chief Executive Wayne McNee has advised the Board of his intention to step down on 30 November after eight years in the role.

LIC Chair Murray King said that through a significant business transformation Wayne McNee has contributed to sustained growth and development of the business.

“From his appointment as Chief Executive in 2013 Wayne has led the organisation through a period of significant growth and development across all areas of the business while delivering strong shareholder returns,” said Mr King.

“Over the past year, Wayne and his leadership team led LIC through the challenges of COVID-19 and the co-op is on track to deliver record results for the fourth consecutive year. . . 

Carrfields appoints two new directors to board:

Lain Jager and Ken Forrest have been appointed to the board of Carrfields Ltd as independent directors.

Lain Jager is a highly experienced professional in New Zealand primary industries with vast experience in the food and fibre sector, including a long tenure as CEO of kiwifruit marketer Zespri from 2008 to 2017.

His appointment is in line with Carrfields’ strategy to boost investment into its food and fibre divisions, says Craig Carr, managing director of Carrfields Ltd.

“Lain’s appointment as a director of Carrfields is tremendously exciting. We are now at a critical time for New Zealand’s primary sector, with our country poised to become a leading innovator in food and natural fibre production which will help address some of the biggest issues facing the world,” he says. . . 


Rural round-up

03/06/2019

Townies ringing the changes on rural folk – Nigel Malthus:

Decisions are being made about and for New Zealand’s rural communities by the 80% of the population who live in urban areas, say the authors of a new book on rural change.

Current trends favour a market led, business focussed approach to regional growth, but these trends downplay social and community considerations, and that needs further thought, the authors say.

Heartland Strong: how rural New Zealand can change and thrive finds that rural communities have enormous strengths which could be enhanced and maintained even in the face of inexorable change. . .

Debt problems rise only slightly – Nigel Stirling:

The number of dairy farmers struggling with high debt has risen slightly, according to the Reserve Bank’s latest stock-take of the health of the financial system.

In its twice-yearly Financial Stability Report it said the number of non-performing dairy loans reported by the trading banks has increased slightly.

“The dairy sector is continuing to recover from the two major dairy price downturns in the past decade. . .

Plan needed for competing wood demands – Fonterra – Gavin Evans:

(BusinessDesk) – Wood is a viable industrial fuel but greater effort may be needed to ensure that new demand from processors doesn’t strip supplies from existing users, Fonterra says.

Co-firing the firm’s Brightwater milk powder plant near Nelson on a wood-coal blend shows that wood is a viable means to reduce emissions from process heat, Tony Oosten, the firm’s energy manager, says.

Capital and fuel costs for new wood or coal boilers are now very close and the company could – were it to be building its Darfield 2 dryer in Canterbury again – do that with wood. . . 

 

World leading scientist teaming up with Fonterra on sustainability:

Professor Ian Hunter is a serial entrepreneur. Born in New Zealand, he started his first company at age nine and published his first scientific paper at age 10.

Now living in Boston, he’s the Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT, the co-founder of 25 companies, and has more than 100 patents to his name.

He’s also working on a new project – a partnership with Fonterra to solve some of dairy farming’s biggest sustainability challenges.

Kakariki Fund to help horticulture starts accelerate growth:

A wholesale investment offer being launched this week is aimed at helping the emerging stars of the New Zealand horticulture sector accelerate their growth.

Kakariki Fund Limited, which is seeking $100 million, will invest in orchards, vineyards, plantations and farms to be co-managed by leading horticulture processors and exporters including apple growers Rockit Global and Freshmax, Sacred Hill wines, craft beer hop grower Hop Revolution, Manuka honey producer Comvita and kiwifruit grower and packer DMS Progrowers.

Kakariki is targeting annual investment returns of 10%*, which will be made up of earnings from the sale of crops through the partners and any increases in land values.  . . 

Meat is magnificent water, carbon, methane & nutrition  – Diana Rodgers:

“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.” – John Muir

There was a recent article in The Washington Post entitled “Meat is Horrible”, once again vilifying meat, that was full of inaccurate statements about the harm cattle impose on the land, how bad it is for our health, and how it should be taxed. Stories like this are all too common and we’ve absolutely got to change our thinking on what’s causing greenhouse gas emissions and our global health crisis.

Hint: it’s not grass-fed steak

In the few days since the story originally came out, I’ve been brewing up some different angle to write. I’ve written here, and here about the benefits of red meat, and how Tofurky isn’t the answer to healing the environment or our health. I keep saying the same thing over and over. Recently, I posted this as a response to Arnold Schwarzenegger’s new claims that a plant-based diet is optimal. I also wrote about Philadelphia’s sugar tax here, and I don’t think a meat tax is any better of an idea, especially when the government is subsidizing the feed. I’m feeling quite frustrated. . . 


Rural round-up

27/11/2017

More business courses for rural women planned:

Business development programmes for women involved in sheep and beef farming are expanding to new locations next year.
The Agri-Women’s Development Trust runs the programmes with funding from the Red Meat Profit Partnership with the aim of lifting the sector’s performance and profitability.

Oamaru and Fairlie will be the first of 32 rural centres to host the programmes in early February.

They comprise ”Understanding Your Farm Business”, which has had 780 graduates since it began in 2014, and ”Wahine Maia Wahine Whenua” for women who are trustees, managers or partners in Maori sheep and beef farming businesses. . .

Cool winter boosts currants – Alexia Johnston:

A cold, wet winter is paying off for at least one South Canterbury berry grower.

ViBERi owner manager Tony Howey said the chill of last winter had provided a welcome boost to his crops of blackcurrants and redcurrants.

Moisture in the cooler months had also helped, he said.

”It was really good for the berries … and for some cereal crops as well.”

Cool temperatures in October, with some mornings near-freezing, were almost too cold, but the crops survived well. . . 

Demand for mini apples drives orchard investment:

Feilding rural investment company, MyFarm is chasing $13 million for the lease and development of four apple orchards in Hawke’s Bay.

The investment group will grow the niche export apple brand Rockit, which is a mini-apple under licence by Rockit Global.

One of the Rockit Global’s challenges has been growing enough apples to meet global demand despite production lifting 40 per cent on last year. . .

Lower Fonterra milk price seems likely – Hugh Stringleman:

Fonterra might reduce its farmgate milk price forecast by 25c to 50c/kg as early as this week after the fourth consecutive fall in world dairy prices on the fortnightly Global Dairy Trade auction platform.

Global prices fell 10% over the past two months since Fonterra reaffirmed its $6.75/kg forecast at the time of its annual results presentation.

After the latest 3.4% GDT index fall market analysts have found some unanimity with forecasts of $6.25-$6.50, along with predictions Fonterra would have to downgrade sooner rather than later. . .

Van der Poel elected new DairyNZ chair:

Waikato dairy farmer Jim van der Poel has been elected the new chairman of industry good body, DairyNZ. He replaces Michael Spaans, who passed away earlier this week.

Jim says Michael was a skilled, dedicated and passionate chair for DairyNZ and he plans to continue the vision established for DairyNZ and dairy farmers.

“While I step into this position under sad circumstances, as a board we will continue Michael’s good work – his influence will continue as we develop plans for the future of our industry.” . . 


Rural round-up

29/06/2017

 

Rockit Global is Hawke’s Bay Exporter of the Year:

Specialist apple grower Rockit Global has been named ExportNZ Hawke’s Bay’s ASB Exporter of the Year.

They were presented with the award by the Head of Trade Finance at ASB Bank, Mike Atkins, at the sold-out awards dinner last night at the Napier Conference Centre.

Rockit Global had earlier in the night won the Napier Port Industry Trail Blazer Award. . . 

Arable Farmers Honoured with Inaugural Awards:

The best and brightest of the country’s arable industry was celebrated and honoured at last night’s Federated Farmers’ Arable Industry Conference and AGM at Lincoln.

At the climax of the industry’s annual get together was the presentation of two inaugural awards.

Mid-Canterbury farmer Eric Watson was crowned Federated Farmers /Bayer Arable Farmer of the Year with Karen Williams from the Wairarapa awarded Federated Farmers’ Biosecurity Farmer of the Year.

$85 million for new Lincoln University facilities:

Primary sector education, research and innovation will receive a significant boost thanks to a capital injection for state-of-the-art new buildings at Lincoln University, Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment and Science and Innovation Minister Paul Goldsmith announced today.

The Government has agreed to provide Lincoln University with $85 million to support the construction of new shared education and research facilities with AgResearch on the university’s campus. The investment will help Lincoln University’s recovery from the Canterbury earthquakes by replacing earthquake damaged buildings with modern teaching and research spaces. . . 

#My60Acres: Is it really illegal for me to keep my own seed? – Uptown Farms:

Its growing day 30 and we have been blessed with timely rainfalls for #My60Acres! The soybeans are doing well and starting to become more visible among the cover crop and last year’s corn stubble.

As I have had the opportunity to talk about my soybean crop, I’ve realized people have some of the same questions I did about soybeans. Is it really illegal for farmers to keep their own seed? Does the government force us to grow GMO crops?

I think these are important questions and with all the misinformation available, I wanted to tackle them head on. 

Is it really illegal for me to keep soybean seed from #My60acres to plant next year?

The short answer is – yes, it is! When we decide to purchase certain seeds, we sign a contract that we will not keep seed to replant. But why the heck would farmers be OK with that? . . 

Mid-2018 opening for Lorneville venison plant – Sally Rae:

Alliance Group’s new $15.2million venison processing facility at Lorneville is expected to be operational in mid-2018.

Plans were announced last year to build the plant in a refurbished beef building, funded with proceeds from selling Makarewa land.

In the latest update to suppliers, chief executive David Surveyor said the team had been working since then to improve the design. . . 

Kiwifruit industry to create 29k jobs by 2030:

The kiwifruit industry will generate 29,000 new jobs and add an annual $3.5 billion to New Zealand’s gross domestic product by 2030, with much of the growth driven by new cultivars such as Gold 3, according to a Waikato University report for Zespri International.

The nation’s statutory kiwifruit exporter commissioned the report to look at the economic contribution of the industry to the Bay of Plenty, Northland and New Zealand as a whole. The report finds that both the Bay of Plenty, which has the lion’s share of the industry, and Northland will enjoy a similar impetus to regional GDP – 135% between 2016 and 2030, with the contribution to Bay of Plenty GDP rising to $2.04b from $867 million and Northland’s to $72m from $30.6m. . . 

Skifield possums return – Guy Williams:

Queenstown’s furry skifield saboteurs may have struck again.

For the second time in a fortnight, the Remarkables ski area was unable to open yesterday because of a power cut possibly caused by possums.

Ski area manager Ross Lawrence said the outage occurred about 6.45am.

”I was doing our reports saying we were opening, then bang, the power went out.”

A helicopter took to the air at dawn and found a power pole, with a dead possum attached, on the mountain’s lower slopes about 15 minutes later.

However, power could not be restored immediately, forcing him to close the ski area for the day. . . 

Colonial homestead in North Canterbury abandoned by UK owners, looking for love – Colleen Hawkes:

No-one is building houses like this any more, which makes it all the more sad that this majestic homestead has been abandoned for the past six years.

The colonial beauty in Swannanoa, North Canterbury, known as Northwood, was last sold in 2011 to a family living in the UK. But due to changed personal circumstances, their dream plans for relocation fell through.

Now, they need to sell, says listing agent Mitchell Roberts of Harcourts Twiss-Keir Realty in Christchurch. . . 


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