Rural round-up

October 19, 2018

Fonterra CEO Miles Hurrell responds to claims co-op is a failed experiment:

This week, the Herald published an article by industry observer Tony Baldwin, which argued in some depth that Fonterra has been a failed experiment. What follows is a response from Fonterra CEO Miles Hurrell to that article.

I took the job of CEO of Fonterra because I believe in the Co-op’s potential and the positive difference it makes to New Zealand and consumers around the world.

It’s clear the challenge is big and we don’t always get everything right. I’ve been open about that with our farmers, unit holders, employees and the New Zealand public.

Now our focus has shifted to rolling up our sleeves and getting on with the job. We are well underway with our business review, which will deliver a balanced portfolio of high-performing investments, aligned to strategy and delivering returns across the short, medium and longer term. . .

Hands-on hard yards training – Hamish MacLean:

Colderidge Downs, in the Rakaia Gorge, looks like paradise, but the Coleridge Down Training Farm is home to hands-on hard-yards-style training for youth with a passion for agriculture and the outdoors.

Covering extensive hill country to intensive irrigated pastoral land, the group of central Canterbury farms cover about 10,000ha, run 42,000 stock units, and take on three cadets a year to ultimately gain level 3 and 4 qualifications through primary ITO in a two-year course.

Lachie Mee (18) finished at Waitaki Boys’ High School as a year 12 pupil last year and started at Coleridge Downs in January along with two other first-year cadets.
And when he started, he quickly learned he had entered the workforce. . . 

 

Pāmu Deer Milk Wins Novel Food Award at NZ Food Awards:

Pāmu is excited to announce its success at the prestigious Massey University New Zealand Food Awards, taking home the Novel Food or Beverage Award for its groundbreaking deer milk product.

The announcement was made at the NZ Food Awards Gala Dinner last night, an event which highlights the best New Zealand has to offer in the food and beverage industry.

“The Food Awards are all about rewarding innovation, which makes this acknowledgement very meaningful to us,” said Pāmu Chief Executive, Steve Carden. “We spent over three years testing and trialing deer milk and have been incredibly pleased with the reception it has received amongst the restaurant industry. We knew it had broad appeal for desserts but have been really inspired by the range of savory applications we’ve seen chefs across the country develop. Some chefs have even created deer-milk cocktails.” . . 

Marks & Spencer weave NZ’s troubled wool into new line – Eric Frykberg:

New Zealand’s troubled coarse wool industry could benefit from a new line in sustainable clothing at British retail giant Marks & Spencer.

Six lines of men’s blazers have gone on sale at stores throughout Britain, made with New Zealand product.

Coarse wool has been struggling to earn its keep for years, with greater volumes having to be put onto the market in an often unsuccessful attempt to make up for falling prices.

Only fine fibre from breeds such as merino have helped the wool sector to prosper overall. . . 

‘Have your Say’ campaign launched for Rural NZ:

National Leader Simon Bridges has today launched the ‘Have Your Say’ listening campaign for Rural New Zealand as the next step in National’s 2020 election policy development process.

“We know farmers and growers contribute $42 billion a year in exports that sees 350,000 people employed in the sector, and New Zealand’s success depends on it. This success is underpinned by sustainable business practices that continue to enhance the environment for our children.

“We want to make sure rural communities can access top-quality public services and infrastructure like broadband, rural policing, education and health services. . .

Big cheese competition – Robyn Bristow:

Amateur cheesemakers will pit their skills against one another in the third annual Amateur Cheesemakers Competition at the Oxford Farmers Market on Sunday.

Those with a passion for cheesemaking must have their cheeses entered by 9am to be in with a chance of picking up a $50 prize. A $5 Farmers’ Market voucher will be given to everyone who enters.

Anyone wanting to be part of the taster/judging panel can register for $2, giving them the chance to taste all the entries and pick the three cheeses that tempt their tastebuds the most. . . 


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