Rural round-up

November 23, 2018

P kicking out dope in the provinces – Richard Rennie:

Rural New Zealand is playing host to a wave of methamphetamine (P) lab production and consumption that has knocked cannabis off its pedestal as the recreational drug of choice in the provinces.

Research by Massey University associate professor Chris Wilkins has highlighted that contrary to popular belief it is rural New Zealand, not large metropolitan centres, where P’s availability has resoundingly surged.

His research work has revealed small towns and rural areas where gang influence predominates are targeted specifically for P use to maximise gang drug revenue. . . 

Heading for a TB-free future – Barry Harris:

Ospri Chairman Barry Harris says New Zealand farmers can be proud of the progress of the TB Plan towards eradicating the infectious livestock disease bovine tuberculosis.

Among the most important challenges facing New Zealand agriculture is managing and eradicating diseases that threaten our dairy and meat exports. 

While Mycoplasma bovis has hogged the headlines recently, the progress of the TBfree programme to eradicate bovine tuberculosis has been quietly progressing as planned.

TB, caused by the similar-sounding Mycobacterium bovis, has been a problem for farmed livestock since they arrived in the 19th century.  . . 

Push for authorities to subsidise farmers’ use of dung beetles to help reduce environmental impacts – Gerald Piddock:

A company that grows and supplies dung beetles to farmers wants to partner up with local government to lift the insect’s uptake across New Zealand.

The insects are another tool to help pastoral farmers mitigate their environmental impact, according to Dung Beetle Innovations director Shaun Forgie​.

Forgie, along with business partner Andrew Barber and Peter Buckley, outlined to Waikato Regional Councillors at a recent committee meeting why it would be economically and environmentally beneficial for landowners and local government to include the beetles in steps for improving water quality and soil health. . . 

Stud stock agent judge of qualities – Sally Rae:

Among the hordes of exhibitors and visitors through the sheep pavilion at the New Zealand Agricultural Show in Christchurch last week, there was a familiar face.

Stud stock agent Roger Keach is a well-known figure within the New Zealand stud stock industry and  regular show attendee for many years.

This year, he was tasked with judging the Hampshire sheep section and  all-breeds wool ram hogget class. . . 

Getting in behind – Rebecca Harper:

A lack of practical experience made it hard for Ashley Greer to get a foot on the career ladder in the sheep and beef industry, but she refused to take no for an answer. After years of trying, she has landed her dream job shepherding on a progressive sheep and beef farm near Masterton. Rebecca Harper went to visit her.

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try, try again. It’s an old proverb, but one that is particularly relevant for 28-year-old Ashley Greer.

Ashley set her heart on a career in the sheep and beef sector and began studying towards her Bachelor of Science, majoring in agricultural science and minoring in animal science, at Massey University. In her holidays, she needed to obtain placements on farm. . .

North Otago meat plants ‘flat out’ – Sally Brooker:

North Otago’s two major meat processing plants are working flat out.

Alliance Group Pukeuri plant manager Phil Shuker said the site just north of Oamaru was operating three chains, processing both beef and sheep.

”Lamb is continuing to come through strongly, with the plant having just completed a very busy period processing chilled Christmas orders for the important United Kingdom market. . . 

Thriving horticulture sector behind new degree at Massey University – Angie Skerrett:

A booming horticulture industry has prompted the introduction of a new degree course at Massey University.

The Ministry for Primary Industries’ (MPI) quarterly outlook figures for New Zealand’s primary sector estimates growth in the horticulture sector for the coming year will be 13.1 percent, a $0.7 billion increase on the previous year.

A three-year Bachelor of Horticultural Science degree is set to begin in February to cope with the expected growth. . . 


Rural round-up

November 16, 2018

McBride to challenge everything – Richard Rennie:

Zespri chairman Peter McBride’s has not had time to put his feet up and catch his breath as he steps down from 17 years on the kiwifruit marketer’s board and becomes a Fonterra director.

But a glance over his career path indicates he has never been one to sit around for long and he ruefully acknowledges there will be more than enough to keep him busy again in his new post. He spoke to Richard Rennie.

Peter McBride’s time with Zespri has not lacked its share of roller-coaster moments and he is exiting his fifth year as chairman at something of a peak at the top of the country’s most acclaimed primary produce marketer. . .

Investment fund eyes Central cherry option – Sally Rae:

Central Otago cherries are being considered by a $250 million horticulture investment fund, but nothing has “lined up” yet, Craigmore chief executive Che Charteris says.

Craigmore Sustainables began fundraising for a new Permanent Crop Partnership in 2016, with a target of $250million. It was “quickly approaching” that target, and expected closing the partnership for new funds next month.

The strategy was to build a diversified business of the best of New Zealand orchards across a range of fruits for which the country already had an established reputation, including kiwifruit, apples and wine grapes, plus emerging crops such as cherries, citrus and avocado. . . 

NZ duck callers do well at world champs :

New Zealand duck-callers have done well against international competitors in the latest world championships.  

They took part in the World Waterfowl Calling Championships at Easton, Maryland, on the American East Coast.

The best results were from Hunter Morrow of Otago, who came second in the Live Duck category, fifth in the Live Goose category, and 3rd in the team events. . . 

CRISPR solves cotton bollworm resistance mystery – Ella Walla-Arizona:

Scientists have used genomics and gene editing to discover a genetic mutation that makes cotton bollworm caterpillars—one of the world’s most destructive cotton pests—resistant to genetically engineered cotton. 

The method may signal a new era in efforts to promote more sustainable pest control. Cotton, corn, and soybeans have been genetically engineered to produce pest-killing proteins from the widespread soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis, or Bt.

Non-toxic to people and wildlife including bees, these environmentally friendly Bt proteins are in sprays by organic growers for more than 50 years and in engineered Bt crops millions of farmers have planted worldwide on a cumulative total of more than two billion acres since 1996.

Consumers confused on nutritional value of milk alternatives  – Jacqui Fatka:

New research shows there is misunderstanding on nutritional values associated with milk alternatives compared to dairy milk. 

Dairy milk and plant-based milk alternatives are purchased with nutrition in mind, yet many consumers are not aware of nutritional distinctions between products, according to a new survey by IPSOS commissioned by Dairy Management Inc. 

Plant-based milk alternatives have grown in number and volume over the years, so understanding consumers’ expectation of “milk” is important, especially as the Food & Drug Administration is reviewing the standards associated with milk. The dairy industry has criticized the use of the term “milk” for plant-based alternatives, such as soy milk or almond milk, and asked FDA to restrict the use of the term if the product isn’t from a cow. . .

It’s cold! But don’t worry our soils are covered – Uptown Farms:

Whoa, it’s cold! But don’t worry, our soils are covered. 

Winter can be hard on soils and on the organisms that live in them. Our livelihood is dependent on healthy soils, and those soil bugs, so we take steps to keep them happy and comfortable all winter long.

🌱 We don’t till, or plow, our fields. No-till farming means less traffic across our field (less compaction) and less disturbance within the soil.  . . 


Rural round-up

November 10, 2018

Leonie Guiney election could usher in new direction at Fonterra– Gerard Hutching:

Democracy is the worst form of government – except for all the others.

Sometimes messy democracy delivers a result that sends an unmistakable message to the powers that be.

So in electing Leonie Guiney to the Fonterra board, dairy farmers have told their co-operative in no uncertain terms they have had enough of the status quo, and new thinking is needed in the wake of its $196 million loss – the first in its 17-year history.

Her election might not have happened if the board had got its way a few years ago when it was mulling over changes to the way directors were voted in. . . 

Labour-intensive task planting pumpkin field -Yvonne O’Hara:

Raewyn Officer, of Lake Roxburgh Village, intends to plant a 4.5ha block of land with about 30,000 grey pumpkin seeds, by hand, by herself, and she is happy to do so.

She works for Darryl Peirce, of Peirce Orchard (The Pumpkin Place), near Millers Flat, who has leased a 4.5ha paddock that lies between Ettrick and Millers Flat.

When Southern Rural Life spotted Ms Officer planting the seeds by hand on Saturday morning, Mr Peirce had already cultivated the soil and had laid one row of black plastic the length of the paddock, using an attachment on the back of his tractor.

He intended to do the same over the whole block, with each row 2.5m apart. . . 

Trade war means NZ picking sides – Hugh Stringleman:

A strategy is needed for New Zealand to avoid the worst effects of a new cold war between China and the United States, Rabobank Asia-Pacific strategist Michael Every says.

“The new cold war could be potentially earth-shattering for those countries which trade with both sides, forcing them declare allegiance or be told which side to support.”

The odds are strongly in favour of the US-China trade war escalating, Every said. . . 

Prickett takes on role at Pamu – Richard Rennie:

Freshwater campaigner Marnie Prickett has earned herself a seat at the table advising the country’s largest farming company on its environmental policies and direction. As a new member and chairwoman of Pamu’s Environmental Reference Group she intends to continue prodding the state-owned enterprise to greater levels of environmental responsibility, underpinned by a sense of excitement and urgency. She spoke to Richard Rennie.

Marnie Prickett was shoved into the glare of the contentious water quality debate two years ago when she headed the Choose Clean Water campaign. 

While not the first campaign pushing for better water quality around New Zealand it was notable for the way it pitched one heavyweight industry, tourism, against another, the pastoral farming sector.  . . 

Top dog trialist to pass on tips

One of the country’s top dog triallists is to hold a training class for owners of heading and huntaway dogs at the Ida Valley Station woolshed later this month.

Roger Tweed, of Waitahuna, will be providing tips, advice and suggestions during the workshop.

Hosted by the Omakau-Earnscleugh Collie Club, the class will be on November 18, from about 1pm.

Mr Tweed has been involved in the sport for many years. . . 

On the farm: Our guide to what’s happening in rural NZ:

What’s happening on farms and orchards around New Zealand? Each week Country Life reporters talk to people in rural areas across the country to find out.

Te Ika-a-Māui-North Island

Northland is a small tale of woe with no rain during the week, and limited moisture in the past three. Soils are drying out and the spring growth which normally continues into early November, hasn’t. Dargaville farmers are making some silage, but further north that’s not the case. Bull beef farmers are looking most glum they have in 20 years or so when it comes to prices too. . . 

Forget cattle, kangaroos are the future of farming – Christopher Cookson:

Recently, I was across the ditch in Australia for the first time in my life and as you do when you go to a new place, I decided to sample local foods. 

Looking around at meat in the supermarket, I was searching for something that would not drain my bank account and make it as dry as an Aussie farm.

Hiding away in a corner of the supermarket I found something you definitely don’t see in New Zealand: kangaroo meat. . . 


Rural round-up

October 27, 2018

Power prices heading north for the summer – Richard Rennie:

 Farmers looking to renew electricity contracts are being cautioned to expect a shock from new prices as the power industry faces tightening supply conditions amid strong demand from South Island irrigators for electricity.

Ruralco Energy general manager Tracey Gordon is dealing almost daily with co-operative farmer shareholders seeking advice as their electricity contracts come to an end and new ones are being set.

While electricity companies are renegotiating contracts with existing customers, those seeking new supply arrangements might find it more difficult to get on board. . .

Large-scale Canterbury irrigation project in new hands:

 An irrigation company has bought the resource consents for the large-scale Hurunui Water Project.

Shareholders on the Hurunui Water Project have voted unanimously to sell the council consents to Amuri Irrigation Company.

Amuri Irrigation chairperson David Croft said the company was aware of a strong desire for irrigation to be delivered to farmers south of the Hurunui River in north Canterbury. . . 

Agritourism witha  touch of southern hospitality – Tess Brunton:

Southland farmers have started looking for greener pasture – and tourist dollars – by welcoming visitors onto their working properties.

 It’s a niche market now, but there are hopes the region could become a mecca for agritourism.

Venture Southland has been running agritourism information workshops across the region this week, attracting more than one hundred people over four sessions.

Velvet prospects sound:

The velvet market during the 2018-19 season is expected to be reasonably stable, with consumption in Asia increasing in line with production growth in New Zealand.

Apart from a brief downward dip in prices two years ago, driven by uncertainty about regulatory changes in China, NZ velvet production and prices have increased for eight years. . .


Meat companies only have themselves to blame if meat prices are too high – Allan Barber:

 Seven years ago, the last time lamb prices were as high as they have been for the last 12 months, overseas customers suddenly decided enough was enough and turned off the tap, causing a sharp drop in price which reached its low point of less than $4.50 per kilo more than a year later. The difference this time appears to be a more gradual climb and a longer peak with no sign yet of a repeat collapse.

The other significant difference is the emergence of China as a key market, whereas in 2012 the traditional markets of UK, EU and USA had to bear the impact of selling to their consumers a product which had effectively priced itself off the market. Today the spread of market demand means more of the lamb carcase can be sold at a higher price; although this doesn’t mean there isn’t some risk of another collapse, there are greater signs of sustainability. . .

Why cows are getting a bad rap in lab-grown meat debate – Alison Van Eenennaam:

A battle royal is brewing over what to call animal cells grown in cell culture for food. Should it be in-vitro meat, cellular meat, cultured meat or fermented meat? What about animal-free meat, slaughter-free meat, artificial meat, synthetic meat, zombie meat, lab-grown meat, non-meat or artificial muscle proteins?

Then there is the polarizing “fake” versus “clean” meat framing that boils this complex topic down to a simple good versus bad dichotomy. The opposite of fake is of course the ambiguous but desirous “natural.” And modeled after “clean” energy, “clean” meat is by inference superior to its alternative, which must logically be “dirty” meat.

See the whole picture here.


Rural round-up

October 7, 2018

Quite and capable – Richard Rennie:

A farm apprenticeship course now a year old is starting to have an influence on getting more Kiwis in jobs on dairy farms.

Tirau farm apprentice Kadience Ruakere-Forbes is among the first year’s intake under the Federated Farmers’ Apprenticeship Dairy Programme, a pilot programme supported by PrimaryITO, the federation and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. . . 

Dairy database rules under review – Hugh Stringleman:

The valuable core database of the New Zealand dairy industry is subject to a regulatory review by the Ministry for Primary Industries, to which organisations and people can make submissions.

Consultation will run for six weeks until November 12 and any submission becomes public information, MPI said.

The key issue is whether the regulated dataset remains well aligned with the dairy industry’s current and future animal evaluation needs. MPI said there has been some concern expressed among dairy genetics companies about the management of herd improvement data. . .

Huge costs of pasture pests – Peter BUrke:

Grass grub and porina are causing $2.3 billion of damage to New Zealand pastures annually, according to an AgResearch study.

Of the total estimated annual losses in average years, up to $1.4b occurs on dairy farms and up to $900m on sheep and beef farms.

But scientist Colin Ferguson says this figure relates only to the damage to pasture and doesn’t include the cost of replacing the pasture, destocking and restocking and the long lasting damage to affected pasture. . . 

$11m study dives into high value milk products – Peter Burke:

A five year, $11 million research project has begun, aimed at producing new high value milk products.

Led by Professor Warren McNabb, of the Riddet Institute, Palmerston North, the project will seek better mechanistic understanding of the various milks produced in New Zealand including cow, goat, sheep and deer.

A particular aim will be to develop new products for babies, very young children and elderly people in New Zealand and, especially, for export. . .

 

First failed WorkSafe prosecution:

Athenberry Holdings Ltd grows Kiwifruit near Katikati. Zespri buy the fruit, brand, market and sell the fruit. Zespri engaged Agfirst to sample and test maturity and quality of fruit.

Agfirst use a local packhouse Hume to collect the samples. AgFirst’s sample collector died during the collection of fruit when her quad bike overturned on rough ground next to Athenberry’s kiwifruit block.

She was employed by AgFirst who had contracted a local packhouse – Hume Pack-N-Cool Ltd (Hume). It appears the rider had taken the quad bike over steep and rough terrain away from the area where she was required to collect samples.

Her training and industry practices are that you stick to the offical and mown access paths. No-one was sure why she deviated. . . 

Gene edited food is coming to your plate, no regulation included – Lydia Mulvany:

For Pete Zimmerman, a Minnesota farmer, the age of gene-edited foods has arrived. While he couldn’t be happier, the soybeans he’s now harvesting are at the crux of a long-running debate about a “Frankenfood” future.

Zimmerman is among farmers in several states now harvesting 16,000 acres of DNA-altered soybeans destined to be used in salad dressings, granola bars and fry oil, and sold to consumers early next year. It’s the first commercialized crop created with a technique some say could revolutionize agriculture, and others fear could carry as-yet-unknown peril.

In March, the top U.S. regulator said no new rules or labeling are needed for gene-edited plants since foreign DNA isn’t being inserted, the way traditional genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, are made. Instead, enzymes that act like scissors are used to tweak a plant’s genetic operating system to stop it from producing bad stuff — in this case, polyunsaturated fats — or enhance good stuff that’s already there. . . 


Rural round-up

September 6, 2018

Daunting report puts trees first – RIchard Rennie:

A landscape full of daunting challenges for the primary sector as New Zealand transitions to a zero carbon economy has been painted in a Productivity Commission report of Biblical proportions.

While by no means confined to agriculture the Low Emissions Economy report studying steps to zero carbon by 2050 puts agriculture at the sharp end of main policy shifts its authors cover.

It calls for major land use change to increase forestry and horticulture.  . .

Kiwi agri women lead the way – Annette Scott;

New Zealand is leading the way when it comes to including women in agricultural businesses, Agri Women’s Development Trust executive director Lindy Nelson says.

Speaking on behalf of the Ministry for Primary Industries and Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment as the sole NZ representative at the Asia-Pacific Economic Conference (Apec) 2018 in Papua New Guinea, Nelson was inspired by what she had to offer.

She was presenting as part of the agriculture and fisheries dialogue that had member economies addressing the importance of including women in the agribusiness value chain.

The focus of discussions was exploring practical ways of doing that. . . 

Fonterra split must be debated – Hugh Stringleman:

Further evolution of Fonterra’s capital structure needs discussion by farmer-shareholders, 2018 Kellogg scholar and dairy farmer James Courtman says.

Shareholders first need to settle on the direction of travel and whether the co-operative should be a strong player in the fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) market.

“Or are our values and risk appetite more aligned to producing high-value base products to sell to multinationals who already have strong consumer brands,” Courtman wrote in his Kellogg report.

“Neither option is right or wrong but doing one option poorly due to a lack of capital or misaligned strategy is not a good option for the business.” . . 

Apple and stonefruit industry members disappointed with revised MPI directions:

With one minute before the 5:00pm deadline set by the High Court, MPI has issued revised directions to the affected apple and stonefruit industry members, under s122 of the Biosecurity Act.

The directions appear to be as wide as the previous order, referring to the tens of thousands of apple (Malus) and stonefruit (Prunus) plants previously seized by MPI under s116 of the Biosecurity Act, which was deemed unlawful following a High Court judicial review. . .

Zespri forecasts jump in annual profit as it seeks to maintain value in ‘challenging’ market – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – Zespri Group, the country’s kiwifruit export marketing body, expects profit to surge higher in the coming year as it grows volumes and seeks to maintain values in “challenging” markets with higher volumes of low-priced fruit.

The Mount Maunganui-based company reaffirmed its forecast for net profit of between $175 million and $180 million in the year ending March 31, 2019, up from $101.8 million last financial year. It expects to pay a dividend per share of $1.35-to-$1.40, up from 76 cents per share last season. . .

Genetic solutions to pest control – Neil Gemmell:

New Zealand stunned the world in 2016 announcing a goal to eradicate mammalian predators by 2050. The key targets are possums, rats and stoats; species that cause enormous damage to our flora and fauna and in some cases are an economic burden to our productive sectors.

As all of these species were introduced to New Zealand from elsewhere there is little sympathy nationally for any of them and their control and eradication has been a key component of conservation and animal health management in this country for decades. Thanks to the work of many we can control and even eradicate many of these species at increasingly large scales. The success of these programs has seen a variety of ‘pest-free’ offshore sanctuaries formed, such as Kapiti Island and the Orokonui mainland sanctuary where many native species, including kiwi, kōkako, and kākā now have a realistic chance for population persistence and recovery. . .

MPI joins forces with forest industry on biosecurity readiness:

The Ministry for Primary Industries and the New Zealand Forest Owners Association (FOA) are joining forces under the GIA (Government Industry Agreement) to improve forest biosecurity preparedness.

The first jointly-funded initiative under this partnership will be a forest biosecurity surveillance programme designed to detect unwanted forest pests and pathogens in high-risk places.

FOA and MPI recently signed the Commercial Plantation Forestry Sector Operational Agreement for Readiness under the GIA. This agreement establishes a new way of working in partnership between the two organisations and will see a doubling of efforts to improve forest biosecurity readiness, says Andrew Spelman, MPI’s Acting Director, Biosecurity Readiness. . .

EPA: Views sought on new fungicide to protect arable crops:

The EPA is calling for submissions on an application by Bayer New Zealand Limited to approve a fungicide called Vimoy Iblon for use in New Zealand to protect cereal crops.

The fungicide’s active ingredient isoflucypram, has not yet been approved in any country.

Bayer is intending to market its use to control scald, net blotch, Ramularia leaf spot in barley, leaf rust in barley and wheat, stripe rust in wheat and triticale, and speckled leaf blotch in wheat. . .


Rural round-up

August 24, 2018

Water guru laments lost chances – Richard Rennie:

After half a century working with natural resources around the world and now in his career twilight Dr Terry Heiler despairs about New Zealand’s ability to develop a cohesive, sustainable water policy that supports irrigators, communities and the environment.

The irrigation pioneer and 2013 Lincoln Bledisloe Medal winner believes the problems around NZ’s irrigation funding are heightened in a global environment where hedge funds are seeking investment in a world requiring about $3.7 trillion a year in infrastructure investment.  . .

 

Milking It: taking calves from their mothers keeps the dairy industry going – Esther Taunton:

NZ is known for its dairy products, and is home to one of the biggest dairy companies in the world. In this Stuff special investigation, we examine how the price of milk is set and explore the industry behind our liquid asset.

It’s a practice often questioned by non-farmers but separating newborn calves from their mothers is better for the animals, a dairying leader says.

Janet Schultz, Federated Farmers Taranaki dairy chairwoman, said although taking calves from their mothers might appear cruel, it was necessary for the health of the animals and the industry.

Schultz said cows experienced the same discomfort as human mothers when their milk came in and a calf couldn’t drink enough to relieve the pain. . . 

Feeding cows seaweed cuts 99% of greenhouse gas emissions from their burps, research finds – Josh Gabbatiss:

Feeding seaweed to cows could slash the amount of climate change-inducing methane emissions from their burps.

Preliminary research has indicated a small amount of marine algae added to cattle food can reduce methane emissions from cattle gut microbes by as much as 99 per cent.

Now, scientists in California are hoping to help farmers meet strict new emissions targets by performing the first ever tests of seaweed feed in live dairy cows. . .

Continue to transform dairy field – Martin Wiedmann:

The dairy industry in New York and across the United States is at a crossroads. Even though cow’s milk remains one of the all-time best sources of dietary energy, protein and fat, people in the United States are drinking less of it. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Americans in 2016 consumed 154 pounds of fluid milk per capita year, down from 200 pounds or 25 percent just since the year 2000.

Along with a glut in milk production and trade uncertainty in global markets for dairy products, the lack of variability in dairy beverage offerings for consumers is placing New York dairy farmers under considerable financial and economic stress — and putting some out of business altogether. The state of New York has lost about 2,000 dairy farmers in the last decade alone, and more than 8,000 in the past 30 years. . .

Gates shut on daffodil viewing – Chris Tobin:

People once came in droves to admire the thousands of dancing daffodils at Pleasant Valley Daffodil Farm, just outside Geraldine, but it will not be happening this spring.

”We’ve decided not to open to the public now,” Gordon Coombes, who runs the daffodil farm with his wife, Cindy, said.

”By the same token, people’s lives have changed.

”When we started, most worked 40-hour weeks and weekends were free but people’s shopping and working lives have changed.

”The younger generation don’t have the same interest in gardening and they’re too busy. . .

Young Grower title goes back to the Bay:

After a lengthy battle, Danni van der Heijden was crowned Young Grower of the Year 2018 at an event in Napier last night.

Danni, 24, was named the winner after a day-long gauntlet of horticultural challenges, testing her skills and knowledge to the limits. As the regional Bay of Plenty champion, she beat out six other contestants for the title, and also secured the national title of Young Fruit Grower of the Year, along with finance, innovation, and speech awards.

First runner-up was Lisa Arnold from Hawke’s Bay, while third place went to Central Otago’s Hamish Darling. . . 

NZ Sommelier of the Year Competitions:

The New Zealand Sommelier of the Year 2018 has been won by Marek Przyborek of Huami Restaurant at Sky City.

The title was announced by Head Judge Cameron Douglas MS at the New Zealand Sommelier and Wine Professionals Awards Dinner earlier this week.

In a close-run competition, Andrea Martinisi from the Grove and Baduzzi Restaurants in Auckland and Maciej Zimny from Noble Rot in Wellington were runners-up. .


%d bloggers like this: