Rural round-up

April 5, 2017

Kiwi lamb supply helps UK farmers – Colin Ley:

A significant drop in New Zealand lamb exports to the United Kingdom this year has been noted by Scottish farm economist Stuart Ashworth as a key factor in a recent improvement in lamb values on the British market.  

“NZ data suggests that their lamb kill in the run-up to the key Easter period has been lower than last year and exports to the UK and Europe have been running significantly below last year’s levels,” Ashworth said during a press briefing in Edinburgh that focused on how Scotland’s livestock farmers might fare over the next two years of Brexit negotiations.  

While he believed it would be “pretty much business as usual” for the UK’s overseas meat trade in general, he agreed British sheep prices, since the turn of the year, had been at their lowest level for four years. . . 

Impressive line-up for Fonterra Dairy Woman of the Year 2017:

Three of New Zealand’s emerging dairy industry leaders are finalists in the sixth annual Fonterra Dairy Woman of the Year.

They are Claire Nicholson from Bay of Plenty, Jessie Chan-Dorman from Canterbury and Jolene Germann from Southland.

Claire Nicholson (Ngāti Ruanui) is a Director of Paraninihi Ki Waitotara (PKW) and Chief Executive of Sirona Animal Health, Jessie Chan-Dorman is a Fonterra Shareholders Councillor and a Director of the Ashburton Trading Society, and Jolene Germann is an Agribusiness Consultants dairy consultant and Chair of Rural Business Network Southland.

One of them will receive the coveted Fonterra Dairy Woman of the Year title at an awards evening during the annual Dairy Women’s Network conference, this year held in Queenstown, 11-12 May. . . .

Poaching reward no April Fools’ joke – Grant Shimmin:

A Timaru businessman who last week offered a substantial reward in connection with the alleged poaching of rare white tahr has stressed it was not an April Fool’s gag.

Neville Cunningham announced on Friday he was putting up a reward of $25,000 for information leading to a successful prosecution for the poaching of animals on a leased conservation block in the Mackenzie Basin. He asked people with information to contact him directly.

He and business partner Ray Harrington are trying to obtain resource consent for a conservation attraction, where visitors will be able to photograph New Zealand game animals, on the 100-hectare Twizel block. . . 

Pieces of Clydesdale history go under auction hammer in Pirongia – Cailtin Morrby:

It will be an emotional moment for Nick and Jill van der Sande when the auction hammer falls on their original DB Clydesdale wagon.

A selection of heavy and light horse wagons, carriages and gigs will be up for auction at Pirongia Clydesdales at 10.30am on Saturday.

The van der Sande family has owned the Waikato attraction since 1999 and are ready to take a step back. . . 

Dozens of Wisconsin farmers lose their milk contracts – Anna-Lisa Laca:

Imagine walking to the mailbox on a Monday only to find a note from your processor that in one month they will no longer be picking up your milk. That’s what happened to several Grasslands producers in Southern Wisconsin this week.

Grasslands handles the majority of cream sold in Wisconsin. The generic, unsigned letter producers received cited issues selling product to Canada as the reason for their decision to cut ties with some of their producer suppliers, but some producers aren’t buying it. For the approximately 75 producers reportedly being dropped, distance from the milk plant appears to be a factor in determining to kill their contracts.

At press time, Grasslands had not responded to a request for comments. . . 

Primary sector exports continue to grow:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy is welcoming new figures forecasting that primary sector exports will reach $37.5 billion for the year ending June 2017, up $0.8 billion from the previous December forecast.

“This is the first time the Ministry for Primary Industries has produced a quarterly update of its Situation Outlook for Primary Industries (SOPI) which will give us a more accurate picture during the year,” says Mr Guy.

“Next year overall primary sector exports are expected to grow by 9.7% to $41 billion. It shows we have a strong and diversified primary sector with sectors like forestry and horticulture continuing to do well. It’s also pleasing to see dairy on the rebound after a tough few seasons. . . 

A Man for All Seasons:

Allan Fong, the Pukekohoe market gardener and face of The Fresh Grower, who’s introduced New Zealanders to an exciting menu of versatile and flavourful vegetables, has been recognised as an outstanding leader and innovator winning a prestigious Australasian agribusiness award for all-round excellence.

“Our seasonal selections reinvent familiar veges but with a fresh take and grown to fit the current generation’s values, lifestyles and tastes for natural, convenient, whole foods that are safe and delicious to eat,” says Allan, who runs The Fresh Grower with brother Colin. “We take what are niche or exotic products like baby cos and fancy lettuces or slender broccoli stems and make them readily accessible, mainstream lines that add variety and versatility to every day meals.” . . 

 

Image may contain: meme and text

If at first you don’t succeed, keep trying until you’re really screwed.

Dairy farm with options placed on the market for sale:

An easy-to-manage dairy farm near the Waikato township of Pipiroa has been placed on the market for sale.

The 59 hectare flat and fertile property is made up of 14 individual land titles of varying sizes. The farm milks 144 fresian and fresian-cross cows – producing 52,101 kilograms of milk solids last season with a contract to Open Country Dairy – and is located at 1460 State highway 25, Pipiroa beside the banks of the Piako River.

The property’s 47 paddocks are separated with a mix of one and two-wire electric fencing – with a loop race ensuring ease of both stock and farm machinery movement across the land. The farm water source is from a quality council-supplied water line. Bought-in feed has been up to 150 bales of silage over the past two summers to supplement the chicory grown on-site. . . 

Beef + Lamb New Zealand resolutions pass:

Farmers have supported the three resolutions made at the Beef + Lamb New Zealand Annual Meeting on 30 March 2017.

They related to changes to the Beef + Lamb New Zealand Constitution, changing the directors’ fees pool and appointing an auditor.

The official results from Electionz.com who conducted the vote on behalf of Beef + Lamb New Zealand are:- . . 

Vodafone, Spark and 2degrees submit joint proposal to enhance broadband and mobile services for rural communities:

Vodafone, Spark and 2degrees today announced a joint proposal to improve rural broadband and mobile infrastructure. The three telecommunications providers have made a submission to the Government for the delivery of high speed broadband and mobile infrastructure using the Rural Broadband Initiative Extension (RBI2) and Mobile Black Spot Fund.

If successful, the bid would see Vodafone, Spark and 2degrees invest hundreds of millions of dollars over the life of the project, including a capital contribution of $75m to establish the infrastructure. The investment package also includes the contribution of spectrum, ongoing operating expenditure and other resources required to deliver and run this significant infrastructure deployment programme. This more than matches the Government’s own contribution of $150m, via the Telecommunications Development Levy (TDL). . . 


Rural round-up

April 24, 2015

100 years 100 horses unites community:

The tale behind this Saturday’s 20km trek by 100 horses and riders to honour their Anzac war dead has galvanised rural communities around Waikari, north Canterbury, even after the worst drought for 60 years.

On Anzac Day, a spectacular remembrance called ‘100 Years, 100 Horses’, assisted by a Fonterra Grass Roots Fund donation, will see 100 riders in formation – many of them dressed in replica gear from World War I. They will pay tribute, not just to the fallen, but to the community spirit behind the Canterbury Mounted Rifles.

Fonterra’s Grass Roots Fund was touched by the story of the Rifles, part of the New Zealand Mounted Rifle Brigade which left Lyttelton in 1914 for the conflict in Turkey with just under 2000 men and over 2000 horses. The north Canterbury townships of the Hurunui district – Waikari, Hurunui, Mason Flats, Peaks and Hawarden – provided 187 of the riders, 42 of whom did not return. . .

Landowners ease path to Tinui Cross, NZ’s first Anzac memorial  – Gerard Hutching:

Farmers and landowners in the Tinui district of the Wairarapa have been “superb” over the creation of a walkway across their land to the historic Tinui Anzac Cross.

The first Anzac memorial built in New Zealand, the cross was built in 1916 on top of Mount Maunsell, or Tinui Taipo as it is known locally.

It has long been a tradition for locals to walk the three kilometres from the Tinui cemetery to the cross on Anzac Day, but in recent years numbers have grown.

Chairman of the Tinui Parish Anzac Trust, Alan Emerson, said the Trust had wanted to establish informal access to the cross for a number of years, and a route through Tinui Forest Park and a neighbouring farm belonging to Mike and Lesley Hodgins proved most suitable. . . .

Dealing weeds a crushing blow – Time Cronshaw:

Frustrated by weeds infiltrating his crops Aussie farmer Ray Harrington borrowed coal mining technology to come up with an invention turning heads internationally, writes Tim Cronshaw.

Crushing was the final C option that farmer-inventor Ray Harrington turned to for eliminating persistent weeds on his Western Australia farm.

“I knew we would have to do something different to stave off the impending (herbicide) resistance and knew what was coming. That is why I decided to build in my mind what I dubbed as as the Big C project. We knew the chaff (coming from the header) when we harvested crops contained 98 per cent of the weed seeds and I had to catch the chaff, cart it, cook it, crush it or cremate it and that was the project in my head.” . . .

Bees show taste for toxic pesticides – study:

A New Zealand bee scientist says new international research that shows bees may be getting hooked on some types of pesticides, only paints part of a wider picture.

A study published in the science journal Nature this week shows bees prefer food laced with neonicotinoids in lab tests undertaken at Newcastle University.

Neonicotinoids are long-lasting insecticides which are primarily used to coat the seeds of plants, making them toxic to all insects when they grow.

There is international debate on whether bees are affected by them. . .

Horticulture production exceeds $7 billion:

Plant & Food Research is a New Zealand-based science company providing research and development that adds value to fruit, vegetable, crop and food products.

New Zealand’s horticultural production has exceeded $7 billion for the first time, according to the latest edition of the industry statistics publication Fresh Facts. . .

 


%d bloggers like this: