Rural round-up

June 3, 2015

At Mt Mable what you see is what you get– Kate Taylor:

A PASSION for bloodlines and pedigrees is evident when talking with Norsewood angus breeders Kevin and Megan Friel.

Mt Mable Angus Stud was established at Ohura, west of Taumarunui, almost 50 years ago by Kevin’s parents Allen and Maisie Friel, with the majority of foundation stock acquired from the Puketutu Stud.

On-farm sales started in 1986. Kevin and Megan took over in 1997 and moved the stud to the 880ha Pukerimu Station at Norsewood, north of Dannevirke, in 2008. . .

BERL projects calf feeding could give dairy economy a $340m GDP boost:

Economic benefits worth up to $340m in GDP could accrue from an innovative new science-based and internationally peer-reviewed calf nutritional programme if adopted by 10% of the national herd, new research shows.

Economic research firm BERL has analysed the results from a seven-year ongoing longitudinal study conducted by Massey University (the first research of its kind in New Zealand) into the efficacy of the Queen of Calves feed supplement programme, which uses marine and land plant extracts to enhance the nutritional value of the milk fed to calves. . .

Applications Open for Fonterra Farmers to Lock in Guaranteed Milk Price:

Following last week’s announcement of the 2015/16 forecast Farmgate Milk Price, applications are now open for Fonterra farmers to lock in a Guaranteed Milk Price (GMP) for a percentage of their milk.

There are two opportunities in the 2015/16 season to secure a GMP on 60 million kgMS – up to 40 million kgMS is available in June, and up to 20 million kgMS will be available in December. Farmers who are looking for a GMP can now apply to supply some of their estimated milk production across one or more of five prices ($5.25, $5.15, $5.05, $4.95, and $4.85) at and below the 2015/16 forecast Farmgate Milk Price. . .

Southern Dairy Hub Gets Green Light:

The Southern Dairy Hub has the approval needed to proceed from its industry partners, DairyNZ and AgResearch.

Southern Dairy Development Trust Chair Matthew Richards says the Trust presented the results of its fundraising efforts to the Board of Directors of DairyNZ and AgResearch this month, and sought their approval and financial backing.

The Trust received 516 farmer pledges, with funds committed totalling $1.3 million. It had targeted $2 million in farmer pledges towards the proposal but the support from a majority of southern dairy farmers was a key determining factor in both Boards’ decision for the Hub to go ahead. . .

NZX dairy derivatives have record month in May as uncertainty, liquidity drive demand – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – NZX had a record trading month for dairy derivatives in May, as increased liquidity and uncertainty around dairy prices stoked demand for options.

The NZX Global Dairy Derivatives market traded 18,225 lots across futures and options in May, beating the previous record of 14,723 in August last year. Some 65 percent of the May trades were in options, compared with just 15 percent in August. . .

Briefing on the New Zealand Dryland Forests Initiative:

The committee commends the work of the New Zealand Dryland Forests Initiative. NZDFI is a research and development project working to develop ground-durable eucalypt species suited to New Zealand’s dryland regions.

On Thursday the committee heard from representatives of NZDFI including its founder Paul Millen, and Chairman, Shaf van Ballekom. The vision of NZDFI is for New Zealand to be home to a multimillion dollar sustainable hardwood industry based on 100,000 hectares of eucalypt forests, by 2050. . .

Mid-Canterbury Rural Business Network focuses on turning obstacles into opportunities:

Rural business professionals in Mid-Canterbury will have an opportunity to develop their businesses and strengthen their networks with the second Mid-Canterbury Business Network event for 2015. Mid-Canterbury will host its second event for the year on 9 June at the Hotel Ashburton, Ashburton.

The Rural Business Network provides an opportunity for rural-based business people to participate in events that will help them grow their businesses through networking and learning from others. RBN aims to connect innovative, motivated people from across the range of primary industry sectors with successful, experienced businessmen and women creating opportunities to share ideas, be inspired and learn by example. . .


Rural round-up

May 26, 2012

Reward for consistency – Rebecca Harper:

The accolade of Producer of the Decade was bestowed upon them at the 2012 Steak of Origin grand final, but for Angus breeders Chris and Karren Biddles, it was the reward for consistently producing a quality product.

“We like to breed good product and sell good product,” Chris Biddles sums up the philosophy that has seen Te Atarangi Angus named Producer of the Decade.

Chris and his wife Karren farm just under 1000 hectares on the Pouto Peninsula, near Dargaville in Northland, and have been long time supporters of beef cattle breeding in New Zealand. . .

Plenty of bull topped off with a great feed – Jon Morgan:

Aaaaah, Beef Expo. First to assail the senses is the smell. Bullshit and coffee.

Then it’s the noise. Over the low roar of farmers discussing the weather is the enraged bellowing of caged bulls. And somewhere in the distance a tormented soul is shouting out the same number over and over again.

He’s auctioneer Bruce Orr. “I bid 4000, 4000, 4000, 4000 dollars. I’ve got 4000 to bid, 4000, 4000, 4000, 4000.” And so on at break-tongue speed.

Later, I count him and he gets close to 100 times repeating the same number before a bidder takes pity on him and raises him $200. Then it starts again.

It’s my annual immersion in the world of beef breeding. . .

Shear joy for wool industry

As a young girl growing up on Mt Nicholas Station, at the head of Lake Wakatipu, Kate Cocks was used to a life of uncertainty. Her parents, Lynda and Robert Butson, were high-country merino farmers, their extensive 100,000-acre property spreading from the edge of the lake to the tops of the distant peaks.

“Twenty years ago our wool cheque could vary from $300,000 one year to $1.2 million the next,” says Cocks, who is now the manager of Mt Nicholas Station. . .

Clicking on the link above will take you to a video.

Forum hailed for brdiging troubled waters – Jon Morgan:

 If I could meet the 80 people representing the 60 organisations and five iwi that make up the Land and Water Forum, I would ask them to turn their backs. Then I would give each one a well-deserved pat.

That’s unlikely, so I’ll do it in print. What these people have achieved, and are still to achieve, is awe-inspiring.

Formed four years ago under the leadership of environmental advocates Gary Taylor and Guy Salmon, the forum now includes the representatives of everyone with a stake in the sustainability of our freshwater resource – a remarkable achievement. . .

Dairy expansion pushes cow total to more than 6 million -Annette Scott:

Dairy expansion in the South Island has driven the national dairy herd to over six million while fewer lambs and breeding ewes saw sheep numbers take another tumble in 2011, according to the latest agricultural production survey.

Final results from the 2011 survey show a continued increase in the national dairy herd. An increase of 259,000 dairy cattle brought the number to 6.17m, up 4.4% from 2010.

More cattle were kept for milk production and future replacement, a result of the high payout and strong international demand for dairy products. The national milking herd was 4.82m, 136,000 more than in 2010. . .

The rise and importance of the US dairy industry – Xcheque:

If you have been watching the dairy industry news over the past month you will have noted a growing nervousness about the state of international dairy commodity markets and the flow on effects of this at farmgate.

It certainly appears that there is a gathering storm, one brought about by the over-exuberance of the global dairy traders. 7 billion litres of extra milk production in 2011 from the EU, US, NZ and Argentina, and no sign of the growth rate easing in the first two months of 2012. Domestic demand growth from these countries is typically less than 1% or about 2 billion litres – the balance needs to go onto world markets. Is this possible?

Not if history is a guide. . .

Ray of hope for dairy industry:

New Zealand dairy farmers are expected to be on average 42,000 dollars worse off this season following yesterday’s announcement by Fonterra that it has to cut its milk payout forecast because of softening global dairy prices.

But a New Zealand product gaining increasing attention in the United States could help offset those losses.

Queen of Calves was invented on a Manawatu family farm and promises to raise milk production by 18 per cent. . .

Southland TB campaigner wins deer industry award:

Retiring TBfree Southland Committee member Kevin Gilmour has been awarded the prestigious Matuschka Award by the New Zealand Deer Farmers’ Association.

Kevin has been associated with the TBfree committee for 20 years. Until recently, he ran a successful deer farm on the edge of the Hokonui Hills, while working tirelessly to communicate, advocate and support the national bovine tuberculosis (TB) control programme in Southland.

“The award came as a very nice surprise. However, I can’t emphasis enough how important the support and technical expertise of the New Zealand Deer Farmers’ Association and TBfree committee has been in achieving our objectives,” he said. . .

Farmer-led Canterbury Water Forum to set the agenda:

Hard on the heels of the Land & Water Forum report, Federated Farmers has taken the lead by convening a farmer-led Canterbury Water Forum.  Taking place at the Ashburton Trust Events Centre on 7 June, it gives all farmers a chance to see what the future holds.

“This Water Forum is very much a forum for farmers by farmers.  It’s about looking at water and environmental stewardship through fresh eyes,” says Ian Mackenzie, Federated Farmers water spokesperson.

“It’s so important that ATS is helping us put it together.  It’s about issues, yes, but it’s about practical solutions farmers can take inside the farmgate. . .


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