Progressives won’t factor in next parliament

September 27, 2010

The report on the latest political poll says, as most do assumes that the Progressive Party will hold a seat in the next parliament.

Unless Jim Anderton loses his bid to be mayor of Christchurch and then reneges on his promise to resign from parliament at the end of this parliamentary term, there won’t be a Progressive Party after the next election.

It hasn’t been a real party for years, it’s just a one man vanity vehicle and when he goes it will go too.


Political corpse stirs

June 28, 2010

The vital signs  have been hard to distinguish for months, but the corpse of the Progressive Party has stirred again.

It’s re-registered as a political party even though its leader told members to join the Labour Party.

Is there any reason for doing so apart from allowing Jim Anderton to get the extra funding as a party leader while he campaigns to be Chrsitchurch mayor?

That it’s managed to come up with the 500 members required for registration is evidence the bar is set far too low.

If the New Zealand Motor Caravan Association has 39,700 members, surely it’s not expecting too much to require a group which might end up in parliament to have at least a couple of thousand members?


More gets less

May 28, 2010

What does this say about the standard and appeal of the candidates?

 Jim Anderton’s Progressive Party has found that the more active candidates that it fields in elections, the lower its party vote is.

From Liberation where a series of posts on Key to Victory: the 2008 Election Campaign, edited by Stephen Levine and Nigel Roberts continues with a look at the Progressives campaign.

Given the party exists only in name to provide the would-be mayor of Christchurch with a party leader’s budget, this could be considered an obituary.


Another reason 500 members too few for party

September 24, 2009

The Veteran at No Minister has performed a community service by requesting that the Auditor General investigate payments made to  Jim Anderton as leader of the Progressive Party which is a party in name only.

This supports my contention that 500 members is too low a threshold for a group to enlist before they can register as a political party.

MMP lets wee parties into parliament where they cost us a lot of money and potentially into government where they can wield considerable power as well.

If they can’t get at least a couple of thousand people to agree with their principles and philosophy and pay a sub they’re not parties they’re lobby groups.

If the few remaining members are told to sign up to another party which leaves the group with just a leader, they’re not parties, they’re one-man vanity vehicles.


NZ election results

November 8, 2008

The National Party’s Waitaki Electorate is partying in Oamaru.

National’s Jacqui Dean is the only candidate who was seeking both ticks but we’ll wait for some of the indicator booths to be counted before we get too excited.

eday-002

Update #1: 11.1% of votes counted:

National Party 133,847 48.79 44 19 63
Labour Party 86,035 31.36 18 22 40
Green Party 16,919 6.17 0 8 8
Mäori Party 5,832 2.13 5 0 5
ACT New Zealand 9,347 3.41 1 3 4
Jim Anderton’s Progressive 2,304 0.84 1 0 1
United Future 2,204 0.80 1 0 1
New Zealand First Party 12,373 4.51 0 0 0

That 4.51% for New Zealand First is too close to 5% for comfort.

Update # 2 With 32.9% counted:

National Party 269,633 47.81 42 19 61
Labour Party 180,069 31.93 20 21 41
Green Party 36,083 6.40 0 8 8
ACT New Zealand 20,148 3.57 1 4 5
Mäori Party 12,025 2.13 5 0 5
Jim Anderton’s Progressive 5,031 0.89 1 0 1
United Future 4,763 0.84 1 0 1
New Zealand First Party 24,035 4.26 0 0 0

Update # 3: First cheer of the night – TV1 just said NZ First won’t be in parliament.

Update # 4: Jacqui Dean is the new MP for Waitaki, Labour’s candidate David Parker conceded the seat – at 9.30.

Update # 4 : With 90.9% counted:

National Party 859,959 45.58 41 18 59
Labour Party 634,083 33.61 21 22 43
Green Party 121,982 6.47 0 8 8
ACT New Zealand 69,911 3.71 1 4 5
Mäori Party 42,221 2.24 5 0 5
Jim Anderton’s Progressive 17,665 0.94 1 0 1
United Future 16,804 0.89 1 0 1
New Zealand First Party 80,114 4.25 0 0 0

Update # 5: with 96.9% of polling places counted:

National Party 921,446 45.51 41 18 59
Labour Party 681,707 33.67 21 22 43
Green Party 130,995 6.47 0 8 8
ACT New Zealand 75,148 3.71 1 4 5
Mäori Party 45,465 2.25 5 0 5
Jim Anderton’s Progressive 19,045 0.94 1 0 1
United Future 18,116 0.89 1 0 1

Update # 6: From RadioNZ

Results: Party Vote

    National 45.5%
    Labour 33.7%
    Green 6.5%
    NZ First 4.2%
    ACT 3.7%
    Maori 2.2%
    Progressive 0.9%
    United Future 0.9%

(Total votes counted: 97.6%)

Update # 7: with 98.3% counted

National Party 936,315 45.46 41 18 59
Labour Party 695,014 33.74 21 22 43
Green Party 133,108 6.46 0 8 8
ACT New Zealand 76,352 3.71 1 4 5
Mäori Party 46,208 2.24 5 0 5
Jim Anderton’s Progressive 19,303 0.94 1 0 1
United Future 18,389 0.89 1 0 1

Results: Party Vote

    National 45.4%
    Labour 33.8%
    Green 6.5%
    NZ First 4.2%
    ACT 3.7%
    Maori 2.3%
    Progressive 0.9%
    United Future 0.9%

(Total votes counted: 98.6%)

Update #  8: the blue team has won.

Results: Party Vote

    National 45.5%
    Labour 33.8%
    Green 6.4%
    NZ First 4.2%
    ACT 3.7%
    Maori 2.3%
    Progressive 0.9%
    United Future 0.9%

(Total votes counted: 99.7%)

National Party 949,584 45.47 41 18 59
Labour Party 704,909 33.75 21 22 43
Green Party 134,400 6.44 0 8 8
ACT New Zealand 77,699 3.72 1 4 5
Mäori Party 46,721 2.24 5 0 5
Jim Anderton’s Progressive 19,507 0.93 1 0 1
United Future 18,604 0.89 1 0 1
New Zealand First Party 87,929 4.21 0 0 0
Kiwi Party 11,599 0.56 0 0 0
The Bill and Ben Party 10,728 0.51 0 0 0
Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party 7,571 0.36 0 0 0
New Zealand Pacific Party 6,944 0.33 0 0 0
Family Party 6,944 0.33 0 0 0
Alliance 1,720 0.08 0 0 0
Democrats for Social Credit 1,112 0.05 0 0 0
Libertarianz 1,024 0.05 0 0 0
Workers Party 824 0.04 0 0 0
RAM – Residents Action Movement 404 0.02 0 0 0
The Republic of New Zealand Party 298 0.01 0 0 0
  70 52 122

Update:  # 9- final result:

Polling Places Counted: 6,304 of 6,304 (100.0%)
Total Votes Counted: 2,103,842
Special Votes: 208,001
Less than 6 votes taken in Polling Places: 1,261
Party Party
Votes
%
Votes
Electorate
Seats
List
Seats
Total
Seats
National Party 951,145 45.45 41 18 59
Labour Party 706,666 33.77 21 22 43
Green Party 134,622 6.43 0 8 8
ACT New Zealand 77,843 3.72 1 4 5
Mäori Party 46,894 2.24 5 0 5
Jim Anderton’s Progressive 19,536 0.93 1 0 1
United Future 18,629 0.89 1 0 1

MMP muddies polling waters

October 21, 2008

Colin James says National’s lead in the polls isn’t as decisive as it looks:

Rolling average of 4 most recent polls.

Rolling average of 4 most recent polls.

In a two horse race National is well ahead but if the Maori Party wins more seats than its part vote entitles it too there could be an overhang of three seats.

Jim Anderton and Peter Dunne might add to that by gaining fewer party votes than their seats entitle them to, too.

The party with the most votes usually forms the government under MMP but if 62 seats or more, rather than 61, is needed for a majority that makes it more difficult.

While the gap between National and Labour could tighten the odds are against National falling behind Labour. However, with the overhang it’s possible that National, Act and United Future couldn’t muster the 63 seats needed to get a majority which puts the Maori Party in a position of great power.

And if it goes left rather than right we could end up with a six headed monster with Labour, Greens, Maori Party, NZ First, United and Progressive.

I don’t want to think about what that would do to the country.


Cutting the tax cake

October 7, 2008

National: for every dollar in tax cuts there is almost a dollar for increased expenditure on priority issues dear to the public’s heart – this is the nearest you’ll get to having your cake and eating it too.

 

Labour’s policy will take the cake you’ve baked, share it around and, when pressured, give you some of the leftovers.

 

ACT will provide no cake. They will however, give the tax cuts needed to enable you to purchase a dietary plan of your choice which depending on how well you manage your allowance may or may not include cake.

 

The Maori Party will hold a hui and invite you to share the cake your bring as koha.

 

New Zealand First will ask you to pay for cakes that it will sell, give away or eat themselves as its leader sees fit.

 

The Green Party will legislate so you have to make your own cake from low fat, low sugar, high fibre, home-grown organic ingredients and share it with your neighbours.

 

The Progressive Party will nationalise all the bakeries then force you to eat badly made state baked cake.

 

The Libertarianz will ask, “Why do we have to have cake anyway?”

 


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