We’re loving wool

May 26, 2014

It’s Wool Week and we’re loving it:

Proud declarations of “We’re Loving Wool!” will be heard around the country during New Zealand’s Wool Week from May 26 to June 2, 2014. Wool Week hopes to promote the wonders of wool and The Campaign for Wool’s work in New Zealand.

‘Wool Windows’ will be unveiled from over thirty-five designers and retailers, led by Zambesi Fashion. As CFW ‘Wool in Fashion’ Ambassador since 2011, Liz Finlay’s support is a huge asset to New Zealand’s wool industry.

Throughout May, Billboards and buses will exhibit a wool family proudly wearing New Zealand designed woollen clothing. Campaign for Wool social media will buzz with wool facts and New Zealanders will be encouraged to join the conversation and share reasons why they choose wool.

Supporters around the country have been invited to join the festivities at the Wool Week headquarters situated in Britomart, Auckland. Participants will have the chance to view wool art installations and even a live sheep show by a master sheep handler on Saturday, June 1st.

Wool Week 2014 is run by one of Campaign for Wool New Zealand Trust’s brand partners, Primary Wool Co-operative. “Our goal is to raise the profile of the fibre and raise the profile of the work being done by The Campaign for Wool in New Zealand,” says Bay De Lautour, chairman of Primary Wool Co-operative.

HRH The Prince of Wales inspired The Campaign for Wool in 2010 to promote wool’s myriad of different uses. As a nation founded on sheep farming, New Zealand’s decision to support the Campaign was easy. It proudly stands alongside the UK and Australia as a founding member country.

“With the Campaign for Wool New Zealand Trust (CFWNZT) now set up as a new independent entity, our focus is two-fold – working closely with brand partners in their efforts to drive consumer demand for wool and ensuring New Zealand wool is part of the sustainable high-end global story,” says Philippa Wright, Chair, CFWNZT.

“With PWC investing in the “I’m Loving Wool” week-long campaign and PGG Wrightson owning the “Wool in Schools” project, we are really starting to see the results of HRH The Prince of Wales’ intention to get the industry working together – collaborating on the generic messaging and competing for market share once demand has been driven up, she says.

“Globally, the US is CFW’s market of opportunity. New Zealand Strong wool makes up 80% of all wool used in the US while only 4% of all fibre used in the US is wool. If we can increase demand by a mere 2%, there would not be enough wool presently produced in the world to supply this demand.

“Globally, the opportunity for wool, which is on the cusp of hitting its stride, is exciting and New Zealand wool needs to be a lead player in this market, says Ms Wright.

 

Proud declarations of “We’re Loving Wool!” will be heard around the country during New Zealand’s Wool Week from May 26 to June 2, 2014. Wool Week hopes to promote the wonders of wool and The Campaign for Wool’s work in New Zealand.

‘Wool Windows’ will be unveiled from over thirty-five designers and retailers, led by Zambesi Fashion. As CFW ‘Wool in Fashion’ Ambassador since 2011, Liz Finlay’s support is a huge asset to New Zealand’s wool industry.

Throughout May, Billboards and buses will exhibit a wool family proudly wearing New Zealand designed woollen clothing. Campaign for Wool social media will buzz with wool facts and New Zealanders will be encouraged to join the conversation and share reasons why they choose wool.

Supporters around the country have been invited to join the festivities at the Wool Week headquarters situated in Britomart, Auckland. Participants will have the chance to view wool art installations and even a live sheep show by a master sheep handler on Saturday, June 1st.

Wool Week 2014 is run by one of Campaign for Wool New Zealand Trust’s brand partners, Primary Wool Co-operative. “Our goal is to raise the profile of the fibre and raise the profile of the work being done by The Campaign for Wool in New Zealand,” says Bay De Lautour, chairman of Primary Wool Co-operative.

HRH The Prince of Wales inspired The Campaign for Wool in 2010 to promote wool’s myriad of different uses. As a nation founded on sheep farming, New Zealand’s decision to support the Campaign was easy. It proudly stands alongside the UK and Australia as a founding member country.

“With the Campaign for Wool New Zealand Trust (CFWNZT) now set up as a new independent entity, our focus is two-fold – working closely with brand partners in their efforts to drive consumer demand for wool and ensuring New Zealand wool is part of the sustainable high-end global story,” says Philippa Wright, Chair, CFWNZT.

“With PWC investing in the “I’m Loving Wool” week-long campaign and PGG Wrightson owning the “Wool in Schools” project, we are really starting to see the results of HRH The Prince of Wales’ intention to get the industry working together – collaborating on the generic messaging and competing for market share once demand has been driven up, she says.

“Globally, the US is CFW’s market of opportunity. New Zealand Strong wool makes up 80% of all wool used in the US while only 4% of all fibre used in the US is wool. If we can increase demand by a mere 2%, there would not be enough wool presently produced in the world to supply this demand.

“Globally, the opportunity for wool, which is on the cusp of hitting its stride, is exciting and New Zealand wool needs to be a lead player in this market, says Ms Wright.

– See more at: http://www.campaignforwool.org/news-item/clamours-of-were-loving-wool-set-to-ripple-around-new-zealand/#sthash.Yximo2b3.dpuf

Clamours of “We’re Loving Wool!” set to ripple around New Zealand  http://www.campaignforwool.org/news-item/clamours-of-were-loving-wool-set-to-ripple-around-new-zealand/


Rural round-up

May 10, 2014

Conference to extol merits of goat meat – Annette Scott:

The benefits of goat meat to New Zealand red-meat farming businesses will be the focus of the NZ Goats inaugural conference this month.

The event is being held by the Federated Farmers goats industry group in conjunction with Meat Goat NZ and the NZ Boer Goat Breeders Association.

NZ Goats was established recently by Mohair NZ and Meat Goat NZ to add value to the NZ goat sector.

While there remained much do to rebuild and expand the goat meat and mohair industries, it needed to be remembered goat meat led global red meat consumption and it had a lot to offer NZ red-meat farming businesses, NZ Goats chairwoman Dawn Sangster said. . . .

Campaign taking wool to NZ’s main streets – Alan Williams:

Urban New Zealand is the target of a Campaign for Wool promotion in the last week of May.

About 40 designers and retailers have been brought together by fashion stylist Anna Caselberg for the We’re Loving Wool week, funded by Primary Wool Co-operative.

City buses are already carrying displays and the promotion will involve shop-front displays in Wellington, Christchurch, and a number of regional centres.

However, the base will be Britomart, in Auckland, where several of the fashion designers are based. . . .

The Future of Weed Management: Sustainable Agriculture Series

The recently released report Challenges for Pest Management in New Zealand by the Royal Society of New Zealand highlights the ongoing and substantial costs to agricultural productivity and the economic losses associated with weeds. When coupled with the ever-present challenge of the growing resistance of weeds to agrichemicals and herbicide deregistration, it becomes vital to explore and utilise new approaches and technologies in weed management.

In response to this need, Lincoln University, New Zealand’s specialist land-based University, in conjunction with the BHU Future Farming Centre, NZ’s leading specialist sustainable agriculture research centre, have created the Sustainable Agriculture Series of short courses designed to provide professional development for farmers, growers, or anyone involved in the primary sector; whether behind the farm gate or in research. . . .

Workshop explores ecosystems and the challenge of feeding the world :

Leading ecological and environmental scientists from around the world descended on Lincoln University and the Bio-protection Research Centre late April for an intensive week-long workshop.

Known as the Geographically Appropriate Integrated Agriculture Workshop (GAIA), its key objective was to develop and evaluate a range of scenarios for agricultural land use and management from the perspective of ecosystems and the fundamental services they provide.

The 23 participants in the workshop – stemming from countries such as Denmark, the United Kingdom, the United States, the Netherlands, Kenya and Australia – were using the workshop to build on developments in agroecology to estimate how many people the world can sustain without the current dependence on, and over-use of, both the earth’s water resources and fossil-fuel based chemicals such as fertilisers and pesticides. . .

 Hereford Haymaker to $41,000 – Jamie-Lee Oldfield:

IT ONLY took 17 lots to reach this year’s $41,000 top-price at the Hereford National Show and Sale in Wodonga today.

Sugarloaf Haymaker H126 was the bull, offered by Andrew and Serena Klippel, Sugarloaf Creek Herefords, Corryong, Vic, and purchased by Frank Hannigan, Franco Herefords, Casino.

By Glendan Park Empire E002, the 21-month old bull weighed 1046 kilograms with an eye muscle area (EMA) scan of 139.

The bull’s $41,000 price tag trumped last year’s top of $30,000, and led the way for an average of $6906 for the 112 bulls sold, with 144 offered. . .

Getting up close and personal with the big Panda – Art for Agriculture:

The 2014 Archibull Prize is off to a flying start with a new look program and lots of new, exciting and diverse young people for our young farming champions and school students to work along side

As this great article reminds us

Feeding the world today does not depend on the total food produced. At the global aggregate scale we currently have enough food to feed everyone. It depends on where this food is produced and at what price. Hunger today is a problem of insufficient access to nutritious food and not of insufficient food availability

And to quote the team at the Youth Food Movement

‘4 million tonnes of food is wasted in Australia each year. As someone who eats, buys and loves food, we all have the power to help stop this waste. It’s simply a matter of making our food choices count.’ . . .


Rural round-up

February 5, 2014

Addressing severe erosion on the East Coast:

Associate Primary Industries Minister Jo Goodhew has today announced that public consultation on proposed operational changes to the East Coast Forestry Project (ECFP) is now underway.

“The Gisborne region has a severe erosion problem. A quarter of the land is susceptible to severe erosion, compared with only 8 percent of all land in New Zealand,” says Mrs Goodhew.

“The ECFP funds the treatment of land to prevent soil erosion, through planting trees or indigenous regeneration.”

Since 1992 landowners have used the fund to treat soil erosion on 42,000 hectares. . .

MPI confirm neurological equine herpes – Corazon Miller:

The Ministry for Primary Industries has confirmed the country’s first case of the neurological form of the Equine Herpes Virus.

12 horses have been affected on a single stud farm, six of which have since died or been euthanised.

While the virus itself is common amongst New Zealand horses, MPI spokesman Andrew Coleman says the virus often sits dormant but can manifest into the neurological form when the animal is stressed.

He says stress is a key factor in transforming the common dormant form of the virus into one which attacks the brain. . .

David Ellis, Karaka’s biggest buyer, blames IRD for bleeding bloodstock sales –  Suze Metherell:

(BusinessDesk) – David Ellis, the biggest spender at New Zealand’s premiere Karaka horse sales this year, says the tax department is stifling new investment in the bloodstock industry with its interpretation of depreciation rules.

The value of yearling sales at Karaka in South Auckland have fallen in each of the past six years, reaching $69.7 million last month, down from $111.2 million in 2008. That’s below the average $83.9 million in the past seven sales. The number of catalogued horses has fallen 12 percent in that time and actual lots bought are down 18 percent.

Ellis, principle of Waikato-based Te Akau Racing stables, spent $6.8 million on 43 horses at Karaka last month, almost $3 million more than the second-largest buyer. . .

Plantain Proves Popular Alternative to Pasture:

A Hawke’s Bay on-farm trial shows lambs fatten faster on plantain and yield better than lambs grazed on pasture.

Awapai Station, which is a ram breeder for Focus Genetics recently carried out trials and then held an on farm field day for other farmers to find out more about plantain management.

The field day comes as more farmers turn to plantain as a popular, affordable alternative to pasture for fattening lambs and improving the condition of livestock for mating.

Many sheep and beef breeders and traders say plantain helps produce better growth rates.

Awapai farm manager, Shane Tilson says he has planted 80 hectares of mixed clover and tonic plantain in the last four years and is now seeing outstanding results. . .

NZ agribusiness get dedicated crowdfunding platform :

New Zealand agribusinesses looking for investors will be able to turn to crowdfunding once new legislation comes into effect in April.

The agribusiness-focused crowdfunding platform, Snowball Effect, is the first of its kind in New Zealand, and intends to give small to medium sized businesses access through their website to funding from investors looking for equity.

Snowball Effect’s launch coincides with the new regulations and is the brainchild of Fonterra Cooperative Group executives Richard Allen, Simeon Burnett and Francis Reid. They appointed 26-year-old Josh Daniell to be the company’s business development manager to oversee daily operations. . . .

Judges Choose First Regional Dairy Awards Finalists:

The first regional finalists in the 2014 New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards should be known, following the start of preliminary judging last week.

National convenor Chris Keeping says the launch of regional preliminary judging signals the start of the process to whittle down the 572 entrants to 33 regional winners and then three national winners.

“It is a long process that involves a lot of planning and preparation by our entrants and considerable time by our teams of voluntary judges,” Mrs Keeping says.

“It is also a very satisfying time, as entrants gain insights and valuable feedback from the judges and judges gain satisfaction in assisting people to progress in their career and in the dairy industry. The judges generally learn a thing or two from the entrants too!” . . .

Three reasons to toast the 2013 vintage:

It is said good things come in threes and the three newly released Sacred Hill Orange Label wines showcase all that was good about the 2013 vintage.

Sacred Hill Hawke’s Bay Chardonnay 2013, Marlborough Pinot Gris 2013 and Marlborough Pinot Noir 2013 are now available and winemaker Tony Bish says they are ready to drink and be enjoyed during the rest of summer and beyond.

“The superb 2013 vintage has been much talked about and will be for some time,” Mr Bish says. “These wines tell more of the story of just how good the fruit from the 2013 harvest was.” . . .

Wool merger exploratory talks:

Exploratory talks are underway on a possible merger between two farmer-owned wool bodies.

They are the Primary Wool Co-operative and the investment company Wool Equities. . . .


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