Rural round-up

September 15, 2019

Listen to your farmers New Zealand – WhatshesaidNZ:

Some of you may be wondering why I have been absent on here for the past few months. A few of you even messaged me to check I was okay. I am thank you. 

The short answer is I’m tired.

Among other things, this year has been our first year in business, taking over the lease of our family dry stock farm.

It’s been hard. The days are long and often lonely. My husband has worked 12 hour plus days, in the rain, wind and cold. . . 

So farmers and businesses have nothing to fear according to Ardern? – Henry Armstrong:

When the debate on a Capital Gains Tax was in full swing, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern was widely quoted as assuring farmers and small business owners that if a CGT were to be introduced, they had nothing to fear.

The productive sector and indeed most New Zealanders, quickly saw through this disingenuous claim and made their views known. The Ardern-led government quickly dropped that proposal-at least for now.

It seems the Ardern-led government learned nothing in the process.

New Zealand must export goods and services to exist financially, yet it seems this government is hell-bent on dumping on those very businesses which produce our wealth- which is then, via taxation, redistributed to fund such basics as health, education, welfare and housing. . . 

Show good faith and grant further extension — Feds – Sudesh Kissun:

Federated Farmers president Katie Milne says the two-week extension for submitting on the freshwater discussion document is a start.

But Milne says the Government should show “a sign of good faith” by granting a bigger extension. The Government has extended the deadline for submitting on its freshwater discussion document: farmers say the two-week extension isn’t enough.

“It would be a good sign of good faith if it was substantially lengthened – six months would be optimal, but three months would at least be more reasonable,” she told Rural News online. . . 

Thanks for listening Minister, but bit longer would be nice:

DairyNZ Chief Executive Dr Tim Mackle is welcoming this afternoon’s announcement that consultation on Essential Freshwater has been extended by two weeks – but is calling on the Minister to go further.

“A two-week extension is a step in the right direction, but our concerns remain the same. Farmers still need more time to consider the Government’s proposal and to carefully weigh up the impact it may have on their farms, families, and communities” Dr Mackle said. . .

NAIT simply must work says Federated Farmers:

Federated Farmers presented to the Primary Production Select Committee on the proposed changes to NAIT legislation.

“Implementation and education on NAIT are lacking, we know a system that actually works would mitigate most of the non-compliance issues that currently exist in the NAIT system,” says Federated Farmers Meat and Wool spokesperson Miles Anderson.

“We do not believe that farmers deliberately set out to be non-compliant, and our members have been very vocal of their concerns with the system”.

These concerns include the usability of a system that is clunky and hard to navigate, requires technology which is expensive, and the reliance on connectivity that often fails or is nonexistent in rural areas. . . 

Vegetable growers get behind farm environment plans:

More than 30 Horowhenua vegetable growers are signing up to audited farm environment plans to prove that they care for the environment and freshwater.

At a meeting in Levin last night, Tararua Growers President, Terry Olsen told the growers that now is the time to act to prove to central and regional government that they follow best practice.

‘We need to put our energy into ensuring the Government’s freshwater proposals result in positive outcomes,’ said Mr Olsen. . .

Are European environmentalists responsible for Brazilian forest fires? – Stuart Smith:

EU animal feed import demands pressures crop producing nations

European based environmental organizations were some of the first organizations to publicly advocate against the commercial introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops over 20 years ago. Since this time, these environmental groups have intensively lobbied to have GM crop production banned in the EU. Today, they’ve been successful in that effort, as Portugal and Spain are the only two GM crop producing countries in the EU, with less than 200,000 hectares of GM corn.

Why do GM crops matter in relation to the Brazilian forest fires?

The answer is trade and land. Corn and soy are two vital inputs required to feed livestock. .  .


%d bloggers like this: