Rural round-up

19/11/2020

RCEP good for New Zealand:

New Zealand’s benefits from Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) are wider than just tariff relief, says ExportNZ.

ExportNZ Executive Director Catherine Beard has welcomed the signing of the RCEP trade deal which formalises New Zealand’s trading terms with 14 Asia-Pacific countries.

“Having nearly a third of the world signed up to better trading rules is a great achievement,” Catherine Beard says.

“It will make exporting within the RCEP bloc, easier, faster and more profitable. . . 

Ahead of the game – Tony Benny:

Embracing technology to get an accurate picture of soil moisture in the variable soils on his two farms has allowed Canterbury dairy farmer Peter Schouten to maximise production at the same time as minimising his environmental footprint.

Schouten milks about 2200 cows on the two farms near West Eyreton, North Canterbury, relying on irrigation to grow pasture and crop to feed them.

“We were a little bit ahead of the game installing moisture metering because we saw some potential benefits in having that for ourselves.” he says. . . 

Love what you do, do it with love – Cheyenne Nicholson:

As Mark Twain said, “Find a job you enjoy doing, and you will never have to work a day in your life.” This is particularly true for a Matamata dairy farmer whose life may be hectic, but says she wouldn’t have it any other way.

Ask anyone who knows Catherine Newland and they’ll tell you the same thing, she loves being busy. With several different caps to switch between, and another being added to the mix in November with the arrival of her first child, Catherine says the key to juggling it all is making sure you’re doing things you enjoy.

“A lot of people would call what I do work. I don’t think of it like that. On the weekends when I’m out with my husband Rhys doing farm jobs it’s not work, it’s just us out there getting things done and enjoying ourselves. It won’t feel like a juggle if you’re enjoying what you’re doing,” she says. . .

It’s time for Fonterra to define the new path ahead – Keith Woodford:

Fonterra has spent nearly three years stabilising its finances. The focus now has to be on finding the path ahead

It is now approaching three years since Theo Spierings’ departure from Fonterra was announced. The focus ever since has been getting Fonterra back into a stable financial situation.  When Spierings left, Fonterra was in big trouble with lots of stranded and unprofitable assets.

That stabilisation process will essentially be completed over the next 12 months. In what direction does Fonterra then head? . . 

Beef + Lamb Genetics launches beef programme:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand Genetics is launching a future-focused beef programme designed to generate more income for beef producers and the economy while protecting the environment.

Dan Brier, B+LNZ Genetic’s General Manager, says modelling has shown that through this programme, farmers can increase the beef industry’s income by $460 million while improving the environmental and social outcomes for their farms and communities.

The programme, which builds on previous work by B+LNZ Genetics such as the Beef Progeny Test, is the industry’s response to increasing demand for high quality food produced with a lower environmental footprint. . . 

Beef + Lamb NZ proud to partner with Peter Gordon’s Homeland:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand are delighted to announce a partnership with Homeland – world-renowned chef Peter Gordon and his partner Alastair Carruthers’ new venture.

Best described as a food embassy, Homeland is a dining room, film studio, cooking school, food innovation hub and community space; with the goal of connecting food and people – and boosting trade.

Peter Gordon, who returned full time to New Zealand after spending 30 years in the UK, said he was grateful that the focus of Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s support was on the community work.

“Central to Homeland’s mission is its work with communities. By embracing the many cultures that call Aotearoa home, we can learn and grow from its diversity and share that unique food knowledge with others. Beef + Lamb New Zealand saw that vision and we are thrilled their support can help Homeland in our ambitious community work.” . . 


Rural round-up

26/09/2013

Dairy prices double-edged sword for NZ – Tony Field:

Rising global dairy prices are proving a double-edged sword for New Zealand; it’s great for farmers and the economy, but it also means prices are going up in the shops.

The autumn drought dented Fonterra’s milk production and means this year’s payout is slightly down on a year ago.

But farmers like Peter Schouten are cheered by predictions of a record payout for the season that’s just begun.

“I am absolutely over the moon with it,” says Mr Schouten. “It gives us a really good chance to play catch-up, with a lot of the farm maintenance, the replacement of gear, tractors, ATVs – you name it.”

The economy could be $5 billion better off too. . .

Fonterra farmers cheer payouts as dividends held unchanged, headwinds loom –  Jonathan Underhill:

(BusinessDesk) – Fonterra Cooperative Group is promising a record payout to its farmers next year, while keeping dividends unchanged, underlining the competing needs of its suppliers and the investors in its exchange-traded units.

Fonterra Shareholders’ Fund units ended the day up 0.4 percent to $7.10, having initially sold off after the world’s biggest dairy exporter posted its full-year results. Normalised earnings before interest and tax fell 3 percent to $1 billion, meeting the guidance it gave in July and missing its prospectus forecast.

Sales fell 6 percent to $18.6 billion in the 12 months ended July 31 and net profit rose 18 percent to $736 million, or 44 cents a share. The company paid a dividend of 32 cents a share, the same as it is forecasting for next year and as it paid in 2012. . .

Satisfactory return for Farmers, implemented changes to ANZ business welcome:

The Fonterra Shareholders’ Council, which safeguards the interests of the dairy Co-operative’s 10,500 Shareholders, said the final payout of $6.16 ($5.84 farmgate Milk Price and $0.32 dividend) for a fully shared-up Farmer announced today was an accurate reflection of the season.

Council Chairman, Ian Brown: “Given the pressure placed on Fonterra by this year’s drought and the unpredictability experienced in international markets the Co-operative has delivered a satisfactory return for Farmers.”
Mr Brown said the success of the integrated ANZ (Australia/New Zealand) business, which has encountered tough market conditions of late, is vital for Fonterra.
“The ANZ business has been working hard to adapt to the changing Australian business environment.
“Accordingly, changes have been made to the ANZ business, there’s a cost associated with these and the Council will continue to monitor the situation.” . .

Ngāti Kahungunu harvesting our future:

Ngāti Kahungunu Iwi is developing an Export Strategy. As part of the wider Māori Economic Development Strategy, we are increasing the export capacity of Māori farmers into the market, in other words from the ‘Nuku to the Puku’.

Ngāti Kahungunu Iwi Incorporated and Wairoa Taiwhenua are hosting a Kahungunu Farming Conference at Takitimu Marae in Wairoa on Thursday 10th October 2013. The purpose of this Farming Conference is to bring together Māori Farmers, Land owners, people who utilise primary resources and anyone else who might be interested in connecting, exploring, sharing ideas and being a part of the Ngāti Kahungunu Export Strategy.

Ngāti Kahungunu Iwi Incorporated is proposing that Ngāti Kahungunu Farmers and all Māori Farmers would be better off by supplying directly to the market and retaining all the earnings in the supply chain rather than waving goodbye to the animals and the profits at the farm gate. . .

Precision Seafood Harvesting’ to be unveiled at the 2013 NZ Seafood Industry Conference

It is less than a week to go until the2013 NZ Seafood Industry Conference, where, in a world first for the fishing industry, the first underwater pictures of the New Zealand developed ‘Precision Seafood Harvesting’  technology will be shown to reveal the revolutionary new fishing method . . .


Flood claims cows

26/08/2008

North Canterbury farmer Peter Schouten could do nothing but watch as 100 of his cows were washed into a river on their way to the morning milking.

“When I got there the cows that were walking towards me were just dropping into the river. That was the most horrific sight I have ever seen,” Mr Schouten said.

He said the bridge was “more like a highway bridge than a dairy farm bridge” and the bridge itself was still intact but the southern entrance had been washed away.

On many farms the cows were “just a number” but on his family owned and operated farm they had a “real passion” for the animals and “seeing your favourite cows being washed down the river was like losing a pet dog”.

Almost 30 cows had survived and been recovered alive, but the rest were still missing.

Good farmers do know their individual animals and this would be a devastating experience for the family and their staff.


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