Govt destroys jobs

14/07/2021

How frustrating is this?

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) has shut down a West Coast goldmining exploration venture that was injecting $500,000 a year into the local economy and according to the miner had the potential to create 12 well-paid jobs.

Peter Morrison, who owns farms in Canterbury and on the West Coast, has invested about $2 million over the past year, looking for gold – and finding it – on a 500ha block he owns near Inangahua Junction.

Morrison was working under an exploration permit, employing three skilled operators and local contractors on the 1ha site to evaluate the potential for a full-scale alluvial mine.

“We applied a year ago for a mining permit but we’re still waiting … in the meantime we’ve been doing the feasibility work … trying to work out if it would be economic to go all in.”

A year to process a permit? Isn’t MBIE supposed to be encouraging business?

But after being told by MBIE he was breaching the exploration permit and threatened with massive fines, Morrison has been forced to pull the plug.

“This has been going on for months … I’ve had my lawyer look at it and he can’t see what this alleged breach is — all they say is that the hole’s too big,” Morrison said.

Neither of the two local councils have a problem.

The Buller District Council and West Coast Regional Council both said there were no issues with the land use and resource consents they issued for the site, and Morrison had paid the required surety bond.

But after more pressure from officials two weeks ago Morrison reluctantly laid off his three staff.

“I’m sorry to lose them, they were a very skilled team. I doubt I’ll get them back. And those were $100,000 a year jobs.”

Four MBIE officials had turned up twice in one week and been “very aggressive”, he said.

“They walked around looking grim and grilling my staff and saying it was pretty big for an exploration. But it’s just a tiny fraction of the 500ha permit,” Morrison said. . . 

If anyone’s got grounds for looking grim it is Morrison and his staff.

“We’ve kept all the records, we’ve complied with all our resource consents — and we’ve been harassed out of business.

“They just keep saying it’s too big … the biggest exploration site ever seen in New Zealand. But the exploration permit doesn’t set any size or volume limit. And if they want me to have a mining permit, well they’ve had a year to process the application and so far — nothing.”

An MBIE spokesman said Morrison’s application for a mining permit was being evaluated but there was a backlog of applications.

“There was a sizeable increase in the number of applications for all permit types last year, especially in the wake of the lifting of Covid-19 lockdown restrictions. Applications for gold-related permits really took off, largely driven by a high gold price.” . . 

The number of bureaucrats in Wellington has increased markedly since Labour got into government. If only some could be working on applications like this to help businesses and employment.

The permit queue had grown rapidly in the last few months of 2020, and officials were trying to deal with it as quickly as possible, the spokesman said.

But Morrison’s application has been in for more than a year.

The ministry did not explain precisely how Morrison had broken the rules, but said exploration permits allowed data gathering over small, specific areas to test if the resource was commercially viable. . . 

When they didn’t explain, was that because they couldn’t or wouldn’t? Either way it’s an appalling way to treat a business.

Inangahua Community Board chairman John Bougen is calling on the ministry to explain exactly why it shut down the venture.

It was deeply disappointing to have a potentially productive private enterprise closed by officials from afar, in a community that badly needed industry and employment, the Reefton businessman said.

“These were high-paying jobs for skilled workers, and MBIE has just pulled about half a million dollars in wages a year out of our community, when you count the contractors as well.”

The West Coast is one of the areas most in need of economic stimulus in the country.

The government, and its employees, should be doing everything possible to help businesses, not shutting them down.

“Pete Morrison was investing in our community and we need to encourage new industry, not strangle it with red tape,” Cr Bougen said.

Buller Mayor Jamie Cleine said he would be concerned if Morrison’s operation had been shut down unnecessarily.

“You would assume the ministry had good reason; that there had been a breach of the permit or whatever.”

A ministry spokesman confirmed the permit Morrison was working under did not limit the size of the operation, but he believed officials were concerned that mining was taking place rather than exploration.

If the permit didn’t limit the size of the operation, where’s the breach?

National Party list MP Maureen Pugh said the shutdown was the worst possible news for the community and was avoidable.

“It’s a disgraceful outcome and I’m truly sorry for Mr Morrison, that he’s been treated this way — plus we have lost jobs, not something we can afford to have happen on the West Coast.”

The permit process had been a challenge for many miners for years, Pugh said.

“It is becoming more and more obvious that the Government and its ministries are not performing well and as I see it, there are no consequences for poor performance, so standards slip.” . . 

Any private business that treated its clients like this wouldn’t survive.

The Ministry is under no threat but it’s poor performance has killed off a business and the highly skilled jobs it supported.

This is a very sorry example of so much that’s wrong with the government and its entities.


Offal is awful

28/09/2008

We haven’t had a cattle beast butchered for years because when there’s normally only two of us in the house it takes too long to eat the meat.

When we used to get it done the best cuts that could be grilled or roast  were always used first and we were left with the mince and cheaper cuts languishing in the freezer which meant weeks of meat balls, bolognaise, stews and casseroles. All of these can be very tasty but it takes more time and effort to cook them.

Then there was the offal which I won’t touch which I always gave away to people who had a taste for it.

I realise not everyone can choose to be so picky and butchers report  that rising prices are forcing people back to the cheaper cuts of meat. 

Taranaki Master Butchers Association president and owner of New Plymouth’s Kiwi Butcher, Peter Morrison, said more people were seeking cheaper cuts and specialist advice unavailable at supermarkets.

. . . He said: “A lot of the young ladies don’t know what skirt is – aside from the one worn around the waist – even though there are four varieties when it comes to beef, and it’s the best meat you can buy for stews.”

When you’ve been brought up with a microwave and convenience food it’s quite possible that the old fashioned staples are foreign food.

This is one of the factors which prompted the formation of Super Grans in Oamaru. It matches older people who can pass on their domestic skills with with younger ones whose knowledge of such things as cooking cheap, nutritional meals are lacking and it’s working well.

But not even a Super Gran could convince me that offal is anything but awful.


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