The Resilient Farmer

August 31, 2017

Marlborough farmer Doug Avery had already faced more than his fair share of difficult times when successive droughts through the 1980s and 90s  struck.

It got so bad that he hated to go outside and despair turned to depression. He treated that with alcohol and anger, neither of which helped.

The turning point was a meeting addressed by  Lincoln University professor Derrick Moot.

Doug became a convert to lucerne and started working with the environment rather than against it.

He not only turned himself and his farm around, he used what he learned to help others become more resilient on their farms, in their businesses and their lives.

He’s told his story to many different audiences and now he’s written it in The Resilient Farmer, weathering the challenges of life and the land.

It’s an honest and simply written account of  his life and troubles which could have sunk him and nearly did. It’s sad in places but far from being depressing, it’s an inspirational read.

It’s one of the best stories of or by a farmer I’ve read but that doesn’t mean it will only appeal to people interested in farming and farmers.

The book would make a great gift for Fathers’ Day but that doesn’t mean it would only appeal to men.

It would  be of interest to a wide audience, men and women, country and town.

The Resilient Farmer is co-authored by Margie Thomson with a foreword by Sir John Kirwan.

It’s published by Penguin Random House with a retail price of $40.

 

Doug has a website Resilient Farmer.

Doug and Wendy are interviewed by Kathryn Ryan on Nine to Noon.

There’s more on Doug here

 


The Farm At Black Hills

April 20, 2015

The Farm At Black Hill is the story not only of the farm and the families who farmed it.

It weaves in the history of the Hurunui District, merino wool and the Romney and Corriedale sheep breeds

Most of all it is a memoir of the very full life of Beverley Forrester, a woman who, as she quips to one of her staff, is not afraid of hard work.

Beverley was brought up on a farm on Matakana Road, near Warkworth, by parents who modelled a strong work ethic and taught their family the importance of community involvement.

She trained as an occupational therapist and soon after graduating was appointed charge OT at Templeton Hospital.

While working in various posts as an OT, Beverley continued to follow her interest in coloured sheep. An invitation to judge at the Cheviot Show led to a meeting with Jim Forrester and she moved to Black Hills.

The marriage was a happy but short one. After just 10 years Beverley was widowed and found herself in charge of the farm.

Eventually she had to accept Black Hills was too big for her and she sold most of it to focus on other work.

She and her staff undertook the restoration of the farm’s historic limestone buildings which became a tourist attraction.

She also followed her passion for wool. English cousins helped her set up a shop in Henley-On-Thames. She exports to several countries, has her own fashion label and her clothes have been shown at New Zealand Fashion Week.

Beverley writes in a matter-of-fact style on everything from dagging sheep to meeting royalty.

I finished this book in awe of what she has accomplished.

You can find out more at her website Black Hills.

The Farm AT Black Hills, Farming Alone in the Hills of North Canterbury by Beverley Forrester with John McCrystal, published by Penguin Random House.

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All royalties from the book are being donated to Rural Women NZ.


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