Tuesday’s answers -updated

June 29, 2010

Monday’s questions were:

1. Who uses these phrases and what do they stand for:  Dirty Gerttie, Tweak of the Thumb and Red Raw?

2. Name six members of the G8?

3. It’s farfalla in Italian, mariposa in Spanish and papillon in French – what is it in English?

4. Who said: “If you want something said, ask a man . . . if you want something done, ask a woman.” 

5. The first four lines of our National Anthem in Maori are: E Ihowa Atua/O nga iwi matou ra/Ata whakarongona;
/Me aroha noa .
What are the next four lines?

Gravedodger gets the electronic bunch of flowers with 4 right.

Paul got 2 1/2 right  (they are numbers used by housie callers but you forgot to say which numbers they refer to) with a bonus for good try for # 3 and accuracy and humour for #5.

Adam got 2 right. I’m not familiar with Lilo Lil but he can have a 1/2 for her too and a bonus for humour for #4.

PDM got two right, 1/2 for being close and making me smile for #1 and 1/2 for #4 because he may be right.

The answers follow the break:

UPDATE: Bearhunter answered after I’d done the marking this morning and scored 4 1/2 which earns an electronic bunch of flowers too.

Read the rest of this entry »


Ballad of Ira Hayes

February 23, 2010

Thanks to Paul and Andrei whose comments on today’s history post  introduced me to this song.

UPDATE: Andrei has more about the flag raising and the Battle of Iwo Jima at NZ Conservative.


Tuesday’s answers

February 23, 2010

Monday’s questions were:

1. Who is the patron saint of tax collectors?

2. What is a mast year?

3. Who wrote, ‘Beauty is truth, truth beauty,’ – that is all/ Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know and in which poem?

4.  What is a windrow?

5. Who said/wrote A woman, especially if she has the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.?

Gravedodger got 3 1/2.

JC got two and a bonus for teaching me something else about windrowing.

Andrie got a clean sweep if I accept to rather than on a Grecian Urn and I do. 

Cadwallader doesn’t get the five s/he requested but does get a couple of bonuses for wit.

David got three right and a sympathy bonus for the hay fever story.

Paul got two right – as in his answers matched mine. His answer to 4 didn’t match mine but justifies a point and he can have a bonus for wit/satire and/or desperation for his answers to 2 & 5.

Bearhunter got a clean sweep with a bonus for being word perfect with on the urn (which I wouldn’t have picked up if s/he hadn’t pointed it out).

Rob got 3 1/2

Rayinz got 5 (I let him get away with to  rather than on  too).

PDM gets one and a long-distance bonus since he’s answering from Britain.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break: Read the rest of this entry »


Thais that bind

January 15, 2010

Regular readers will be aware that frequent visitor Paul Tremewan toured Thailand on a Honda Phantom bike last year.

His report of the tour, Thais that Bind, is here.


Tuesday’s answers

December 22, 2009

Monday’s questions were:

1.  Who wrote “Twas the night before Christmas and all through the house/ Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse . . .?

2. Who said, about Christmas, “Bah! Humbug!”?

3. What is Peraxilla colensoi?

4. What is a Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae?

5. What was the origin of Boxing Day?

Andrei gets four and a bonus because he was first but his links diverted it to the spam and it didn’t get rescued until late afternoon.

Kismet gets three.

Paul Tremewan gets four and a bonus for imagination.

David Winter is this week’s winner with five and a bonus for humour.

PDM gets one and a bonus for restraint.

Thanks to all of you who’ve taken part, hope you and yours have a happy Chirstmas and that next year treats you well.

Quzes may or may not appear in the next couple of weeks and if it’s not they will resume sometime in January.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break.

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Tuesday’s answers

November 24, 2009

Monday’s questions were:

1. What is a gnomon?

2. Which New Zealand author lost his left leg in 1940?

3. Who wrote Wilfred Gordon McDonald Partridge?

4.  Which author rode the Queen Mother’s race horses?

5. Who said, If you steal from one author, it’s plagiarism; if you steal from many it’s research”?

No-one got all the answers:

Fairfacts Media gets a point for the speed and wit of his response.

Andrei got 3 plus 1/2 for his answer to 5.

Samo got 2 and I think another 1 for the answer to 4  – although I wasn’t thinking of  Lester Piggot I think he wrote an autobigoraphy which technically makes him a writer.

PDM gets one and a bonus for his answer to 5.

Teletext is the winner with 4.

Paul Tremewan got 1 right and a bonus for teaching me something.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break:

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And the other answers are?

November 12, 2009

Paul Tremewan must have been a Boy Scout because he prepared for a two week absence by answering the next two Mondays’ quizes before leaving.

His first lot of answers were posted yesterday and Rob gave 4/5 for the correpsonding questions.  He’s right about #4, I don’t know about the others and googgled #5 but still didn’t work out the question.

The second lot of answers are:

1 15 May 1991, (replaced by the Employment Relations Act in 2000)
2 Maurice Duggan
3 Kevin Briscoe and Roger Urban
4 a Romney Perendale cross? (We city boys don’t know much about this apart from how they taste, and the fact that their wet weather gear makes excellent car seat covers!
(I learnt that as a student, working in the felly at AFFCO’s Moerewa Works!))
5 Mount Taranaki.

And the questions are?


And the qestions are?

November 11, 2009

Paul Tremewan has prepared for a two-week absence by providing the answers for the next two Mondays’ quizes.

His answers for next Monday are:

1 Kanchenjunga in Sikkim, at 8,586m (been there!)
2 Ruth Richardson, in her ‘Mother of all Budgets’ speech, (either that or a recent piece from Sue Bradford, before the famous dummy spit.)
3 There are two: either the one at the top of Coromandel, or the one in South Westland. (The Coromandel one is named after my wife’s great-grandfather, who was a sailing ship master at age 19. True!)
4 Leptospirosis (which did great harm to Steve Gurney, and also actually did for, my late brother.)
5 San Marino, and postage stamps.

So what are the questions?

(I’ll post his answers for the following Monday, tomorrow).


Tuesday’s answers

November 10, 2009

Monday’s questions were:

1. What’s distinctive about someone with a variation in the MC1R gene?

2. Who said, “Hollow commitments to action in the future are insufficient. Deferring difficult issues must not be tolerated. Our children and grandchildren expect us to speak and act decisively?”

3. Who won this year’s Prime Minister’s Awards for Literature?

4. What is a titipounamu?

5. Name the national presidents of: Federated Farmers, Rural Women NZ and NZ Young Farmers.

Paul Tremewan got two right, a bonus for originality in his answer to #1 and another for humour in his last answer. If his answer to #2 is satirical he’ll get a bonus for that too.

Paul L gets a bonus for lateral thinking and another for humour.

David W got 2 1/3 plus a bonus for teaching me something with the full answer to #1.

PDM – Mike Peterson chiars what was Meat & Wool NZ and will soon be just Meat NZ. But you can have a bonus for humour.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


Adventure before dementure

November 1, 2009

Yes, I know that’s not how you spell dementia, but that was the slogan on  Paul’s nomination for the best t- shirt in this morning’s Auckland Marathon and I thought it deserved wider publicity.

It’s a great philosophy.

The phone rang just as I finished reading it so I passed it on to the caller. He said he thought he should get a couple of those t-shirts in case one wore out.

I’m in awe of anyone who does marathons whether it’s done with the aim of winning or, for the challenge like Otago sisters  Annette Sinclair  and Carol Patterson ( aged 57 and 49 respectively) who will be running the New York Marathon.

We like to get out of our comfort zone,” Sinclair told the Otago Daily Times. . .

The sisters decided 12 years ago to do something special each year.

After being inspired by watching our daughter and niece run a half marathon in Christichurch a couple of years ago I talked some friends into entering the Dunedin Marathon.

None of us was into running but we were all happy to walk it. Three of us took it seriously and finished at around three hours.

The others took a more leisurely approach and stopped for coffee and shopping en route.

But we all enjoyed it which was the point.

P.S. If you did this morning’s marathon you’re welcome to tell us how you went.

P.P.S.: Clarification – that was a half marathon we walked in Dunedin.


Tuesday’s answers

October 20, 2009

Monday’s questions were:

1. What does fiat panis mean?

2. What is a Kārearea?

3. Who said: “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid of misinformed beholder a black eye.”?

4. Where is Timbuktu?

5. Who wrote Beak of the Moon?

Samo is this week’s champion with a clean sweep.

Gravedodger got three right, a half for knowing where the motto came from in #1 and a bonus for extra information in answering 2 & 4.

Lilacsigil got three right and a bonus for getting the whole answer to #1.

Cactus Kate gets a point because it was inevitable someone would make the suggestion she did.

PDM got 2 and a bonus for reasoning, albeit wrongly, with #3.

Paul Tremewan got two, a half for his answer to #2 (not wrong but not the whole answer) and a bonus for remembering school Latin.

The answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


Tuesday’s answers + correction

October 6, 2009

Monday’s questions were:

1. Who said, “Could we change our attitude, we should not only see life differently, but life itself would come to be different”?

2. Who wrote Agnes the Sheep?

3. What is the most common meter in English poetry.

4. Which river ruled Mona Anderson’s life?

5. What did the Magpies say in Denis Glover’s poem?

In case you’re wondering, I had New Zealand Book Month in mind when setting the questions.

Paul Tremewan regains the winner’s crown with a clean sweep, bonuses for extra info and another point for the poem.

Gravedodger got 3 and bonuses for extra info and another for honesty and Paul L got 1.

CORRECTION:

I overlooked pdm’s valient effort – 1 point and a bonus for being first with iambic pentameter, another bonus for humour in answering 5 and another to compensate for being overlooked, and another bonus because he’s either overseas or just got back which means he’s coping with distance or jet lag – gosh he almost won 🙂

The answers follow the break: Read the rest of this entry »


Tuesday’s Answers

September 29, 2009

Monday’s questions were:

1. What’s a mugwump?

2. Who wrote Book Book?

3. Who said,  “I was only doing my job boss, looking after my mates”?

4. The song is Po Atarau in Maori, what is it in English ?

5. What is paihamu?

Gravedodger got four right, though gave only a partial answer to #1, he gets 2 bonuses for expanded answers to the others, and sympathy on the loss of his dog.

Samo got four right too, and a bonus for the creative answer to #2.

Paul got three right, was on the right track with #1 and earned a bonuse for his creative answer to #2.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


Tuesday’s Answers – corrected

September 22, 2009

Monday’s questions were:

1. What were the surnames of Peter, Paul and Mary?

2. Who wrote Bums On Seats?

3. Who said: We are human beings as well as women, and our humanity must take precedence of our womanhood . . . We are New Zealanders, and therefore citizens, and whatever affects the well-being of the Commonwealth is our immediate concern.?

4. The Hakataramea is a tributary of which river?

5. Name the vice chancellors of three of New Zealand’s eight universities (the debate on whether that’s too many universities can wait for another time).

Gravedodger got two right and I’ll give him 3 for the last question because it was his answer which made me realise I had to clarify the question. He gets a bonus for extra info on question one as well.

Paul Tremewan got two right, a bonus for imagination (who’s Michael Snelgrove?) and none for the last but I’ll accept that maybe my clarification muddied the waters).

Paul M gest one and a bonus because he was the only one who got Roger Hall.

No-one got Kate Sheppherd – even though Saturday was the anniversary of women’s suffrage in NZ.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break.

CORRECTION:

Cctrfred has corrected me – The Chancellor at the University of Canterbury chairs the Council and it is Rex Williams. Rodd Carr is Vice-Chancellor and appears to be CEO. I’ve done a quick check and think the others are correct, but feel free to put me right if I’m wrong.

If anyone can explain why some universities appear to call the council chair Chancellor and othes call him (their are no hers at the moment) Vice Chancellor, please do.

While I’m correcting myself, Paul Tremewan gets another point. Michael Snelgrove didn’t write Roger Hall’s autobiography (had he done so of course it wouldn’t be an autobiography) to which I was referring, but  he did write a play by the same name.

Read the rest of this entry »


The mast falling down

September 21, 2009

Paul Tremewan added a comment to this morning’s look back at history pointing out:

On this day in 1981 New Zealand’s first ever foray into the Whtibread Round the World Yacht Race, came to a sudden halt when Peter Blakes’s ‘Ceramco’ lost its mast in the Southern Atlantic Ocean, bringing down the hopes of many with it. While they re-rigged the boat, Grant Dalton and his crew zoomed past on Flyer to win the leg and we zoomed past on ‘United Friendly’, not totally disappointed at Blakey’s bad luck! ‘The Mast Falling Down’ has been commemorated every year on this day since 21 September 1981.

He attached a photo of Ceramco under jury rig which didn’t copy so here it is:

dairy 10008


Tuesday’s answers

September 15, 2009

Paul Tremewan wins another electronic bunch of spring flowers with four right and two bonus points for wit.

Kismet got three points and a bonus for ingenuity.

I’ll accept Gravedodger’s word he knew three and he can have an extra point for the extended discussion.

Andrei gets 2 points and a bonus for extra information and because PDM earned a sprig of blossom for one right.

Monday’s Questions were:

1. “Read him for the tittle-tattle. But for strategic analysis find yourself a grown-up.” Colin James said it, to whom was he referring?

2. Who wrote All I Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten?

3. Titi-tea is the Maori name for which mountain?

4. Sheep breeders encourage multiple births, why aren’t cow breeders so keen on twins?

5. Which ship took New Zealand’s first frozen meat exports to Britain?

Tuesday’s answers follow the break.

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Tuesday’s answers

September 8, 2009

Monday’s questions were:

1. Which countries formed the South East Asia Treaty Organisation?

 2. Who said I suffer fools gladly because I am one of them?

 3. Who wrote Not a Penny More, Not a Penny Less?

4. What is borborygmi?

5. Which is Europe’s only Budhist replublic? (Honesty requires I give the credit for this to Andrei from NZ Conservative who left this question for me. I had to look up the answer).

 

UPDATE: Maybe Gravedodger was right and the degree of diffiuclty in yesterday’s quiz was higher because no-one got all the answers correct.

However, Samo gets an electronic bunch of daffodils  with a score of 3 8/9 (the missing 1/9 was Bangladesh) plus another 1/2  for a good attempt at Kalmykia.

Scoring after that gets complicated because dealing in ninths for question 1 and halves for attempts at others added to the quandry of whether I take off anything for wrong answers defies me.

Let’s just give an electronic sprig of daphne to Ray, Gravedodger, Lilacsigil and Paul Tremewan who made honorable, and sometimes creative, attempts.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


Tuesday’s answers

September 1, 2009

Monday’s Questions were:

1. Who wrote Among the Cinders?

2. Who said: We are biologically engineered to have the wonder filtered out of out lives, to learn to take astonishing things for granted, so that we don’t waste too much energy on being surpised but get on with the eating and mating, gardening, feeding cats, complaining about taxes or being pleased about economic recovery . . . “?

3. How many NZ Prime Ministers have died in office?

4. Where did the Great Fire of London start?

5. Who invented the cat flap?

Gravedodger and Rayiinz get a bunch of daffodils each for scoring 3/5; Paul Tremewan gets a single camellia flower for two with a bonus for orginality and Paul Corrigan gets a consolatory branch of blossom for trying.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


Alan, Alan, Alan

August 19, 2009

Hat Tip: Paul Tremewan


Not just another routine announcement

July 5, 2009

The people who give the obligatory pre-flight announcements on planes always start by asking people to pay attention, even if they’re frequent flyers.

But how many do?

Even today when we were in an Airbus from Barcelona to Seville, I was conscious of all the concerning news about these planes, and trying to test my Spanish listening comprehension I gave the briefing only cursory attention.

Perhaps if the presentation had been delivered this way, it might have made a difference:

Hat Tip: Paul Tremewan.


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