January 6 in history

January 6, 2010

On January 6:

1412  Joan of Arc, Roman Catholic Saint and national heroine of France (legendary date – some scholars think it was January 7), was born.

 1494  The first Mass in the New World was celebrated at La Isabela, Hispaniola.

1540 King Henry VIII of England married Anne of Cleves.

Portrait by Hans Holbein the younger, 1539.

1714 Percivall Pott, English physician, was born. He was one of the founders of orthopedy, and the first scientist to demonstrate that a cancer may be caused by an environmental carcinogen.

Percivall-pott.jpg

1721 The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble published its findings.

 Hogarthian image of the “South Sea Bubble”, by Edward Matthew Ward,

1781 In the Battle of Jersey, the British defeated the last attempt by France to invade Jersey.

1838 Samuel Morse first successfully tested the electrical telegraph.


1878 Carl Sandburg, American poet and historian, was born.

 

1883 Khalil Gibran, Lebanese writer, was born.

1893 The Washington National Cathedral was chartered by Congress.

1907 Maria Montessori opened her first school and daycare center for working class children in Rome.

1923 Norman Kirk, New Zealander politician, was born.

1929 – Mother Teresa arrived in Calcutta to begin a her work amongst India’s poorest people.

1930The first diesel-engined automobile trip was completed (from Indianapolis, Indiana, to New York City).

1931 Thomas Edison submitted his last patent application.

1934 Harry M. Miller, New Zealand-born Australian entrepreneur, was born.

1936 The Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the 1933 Agricultural Adjustment Act is unconstitutional in the case United States v. Butler et al.

1941 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt delivered his Four Freedoms Speech in the State of the Union Address.

1942 Pan American Airlines became the first commercial airline to schedule a flight around the world.

Pan Am Logo.svg

1946  Syd Barrett, English guitarist, singer and songwriter Pink Floyd, was born.

1953 Godfrey Bowen set a world record by shearing  456 full-wool ewes in nine hours.

Godfrey Bowen sets world sheep-shearing record

1953 Malcolm Young, Scottish-born Australian guitarist (AC/DC), was born.

1955 Rowan Atkinson, English comedian and actor, was born.

Atkinson Rowan.jpg

1959 Kapil Dev, Indian cricketer, was born.

Kapil Dev sixes.jpg

1960   Nigella Lawson, English chef and writer, was born.

1964 Mark O’Toole, English bass guitarist (Frankie Goes to Hollywood), was born.

Frankie Goes to Hollywood (L-R: Paul Rutherford, Peter Gill, Holly Johnson, Mark O’Toole, Brian Nash)

1965 Bjorn Lomborg, Danish mathematician, environmentalist and author, was born.

1974  In response to the 1973 energy crisis, daylight saving time commenced nearly four months early in the United States.

1978 The Crown of St. Stephen (also known as the Holy Crown of Hungary) ws returned to Hungary from the United States, where it was held after World War II.

1995 A chemical fire in an apartment complex in Manila, Philippines, led to the discovery of plans for Project Bojinka, a mass-terrorist attack.

 Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


December 4 in history

December 4, 2009

On December 4:

1619 38 colonists from Berkeley Parish in England disembarked in Virginia and gave thanks to God (this is considered by many to be the first Thanksgiving in the Americas).

Thanksgiving
The First Thanksgiving, painting by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863–1930)

1745  Charles Edward Stuart’s army reached Derby, its furthest point during the second Jacobite rising.

1791 The first edition of The Observer, the world’s first Sunday newspaper, was published.

The Observer

1795  Thomas Carlyle, Scottish writer and historian, was born.

1835  Samuel Butler, English writer, was born.

1872 The crewless American ship Mary Celeste was found by the British brig Dei Gratia (the ship had been abandoned for 9 days but was only slightly damaged).

Mary Celeste as Amazon in 1861.jpg

1881 The first edition of the Los Angeles Times was published.

Front page from October 21, 2008

1892  Francisco Franco, dictator of Spain, was born.

1918  U.S. President Woodrow Wilson sailed for the World War I peace talks in Versailles, becoming the first US president to travel to Europe while in office.

1930 Ronnie Corbett, Scottish actor, was born.

1949 Pamela Stephenson, New Zealand-born actress, was born.

1952 Great Smog of 1952: A cold fog descended upon London, combining with air pollution and killing at least 12,000 in the following months.

Nelson’s Column during the Great Smog of 1952

1954 The first Burger King opened in Miami, Florida.

Burger King Logo.svg

1971 The Montreux Casino in Switzerland was set ablaze by someone wielding a flare gun during a Frank Zappa concert; the incident would be noted in the Deep Purple song “Smoke on the Water“.

1978  Dianne Feinstein became San Francisco, California’s first female mayor.

1966 The state monopoly on commercial radio broadcasting was challenged by the pirate station Radio Hauraki’s first scheduled transmission from the vessel Tiri in the Colville Channel.

1980  English rock group Led Zeppelin officially disbandsed following the death of drummer John Bonham on September 25th.


Led Zeppelin in 1968. From left to right: John Bonham, Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones

1991 Journalist Terry A. Anderson was released after 7 years in captivity as a hostage in Beirut.

1991 Captain Mark Pyle piloted Clipper Goodwill, a Pan American World Airways Boeing 727-221ADV, to Miami International Airport ending 64 years of Pan Am operations.

Pan Am Logo.svg

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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