Suffer the little children

18/12/2014

Evil is the only word to describe people who target innocent children:

Pakistan has begun three days of mourning for the 132 children and nine school staff massacred by the Taliban in the country’s deadliest ever terror attack.

The 141 people were killed when insurgents stormed an army-run school in the northwestern city of Peshawar and systematically went from room to room, shooting children during an eight-hour killing spree.

The attack, claimed by the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) as revenge for a major military offensive in the region, sparked worldwide condemnation and led the Pakistani government and military to reaffirm their determination to defeat a group that has killed thousands since 2007.

Teenage survivor Shahrukh Khan, who ducked below his desk with classmates when four gunmen burst into their room, described how he played dead after being shot in both legs, stuffing his tie into his mouth to stifle his screams.

“I saw a pair of big black boots coming towards me, this guy was probably hunting for students hiding beneath the benches,” the 16-year-old said from the trauma ward of the city’s Lady Reading Hospital.

“The man with big boots kept on looking for students and pumping bullets into their bodies. I lay as still as I could and closed my eyes, waiting to get shot again,” he said.

“My body was shivering. I saw death so close and I will never forget the black boots approaching me – I felt as though it was death that was approaching me.”

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif announced three days of national mourning and described the attack as a “national tragedy unleashed by savages”. . .

In the past children might have been hurt or injured as a result of war but this targeting of them is a relatively new and sickening development.

Nothing justifies the wanton slaughter of innocent children.


January 28 in history

28/01/2010

On January 28: 

1225 Saint Thomas Aquinas, was born. 

 

1457  King Henry VII, was born. 

 

1521 The Diet of Worms began. 

1547 Henry VIII died. His nine year old son, Edward VI became King, and the first Protestant ruler of England

1573Articles of the Warsaw Confederation were signed, sanctioning freedom of religion in Poland.

 Original act of the Warsaw Confederation

1582  John Barclay, Scottish writer, was born. 

1624 Sir Thomas Warner founded the first British colony in the Caribbean, on the island of Saint Kitts

1706 John Baskerville, English printer, was born. 

  

1724 The Russian Academy of Sciences was founded in St. Petersburg by Peter the Great, and implemented in the Senate decree. 

1754 Horace Walpole, in a letter to Horace Mann, coined the word serendipity

1813 Pride and Prejudice was first published in the United Kingdom.

PrideAndPrejudiceTitlePage.jpg

1820 – Russian expedition led by Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen and Mikhail Petrovich discovered the Antarctic continent approaching the Antarctic coast. 

1827  French explorer Jules Sébastien César Dumont d’Urville sailed the Astrolabe through French Pass and into Admiralty Bay in the Marlborough Sounds. 

D'Urville sails through French Pass 

1833 Charles George ‘Chinese’ Gordon, British soldier and administrator, was born. 

Gordon Pasha as Governor of Sudan 

1841 Henry Morton Stanley, Welsh-born explorer and journalist, was born. 


 

1855 The first locomotive ran from the Atlantic to the Pacific on the Panama Railway. 

1855 William Seward Burroughs I, American inventor, was born. 

 Patent no. 388,116 on a “calculating machine”. 

1863 Ernst William Christmas, Australian painter, was born. 

 ‘Kilauea Caldera’, oil on canvas painting by Ernest William Christmas, 1863-1918 

 1864 Charles W. Nash, American automobile entrepreneur, co-founder Buick Company,  was born. 

 1910 Buick Model 17 

1864 – Herbert Akroyd Stuart, English inventor of the hot bulb heavy oil engine, was born. 

  

1871 Franco-Prussian War: the Siege of Paris ended in French defeat and an armistice. 

1873 Colette, French writer, was born. 

 

1878 Yale Daily News became the first daily college newspaper in the United States. 

1887  Arthur Rubinstein, Polish pianist and conductor, was born.

1887  In a snowstorm at Fort Keogh, Montana, the world’s largest snowflakes were reported, being 15 inches (38 cm) wide and 8 inches (20 cm) thick.

1890  Robert Stroud,  American convict, the Birdman of Alcatraz, was born.

1896  Walter Arnold of East Peckham, Kent became the first person to be convicted of speeding. He was fined 1 shilling plus costs for speeding at 8 mph (13 km/h), thus exceeding the contemporary speed limit of 2 mph (3.2 km/h). 

1901 Wellington blacksmith, William Hardham, won the Victoria Cross – the only New Zealander to do so in the South African War. 

Hardham wins VC in South Africa 

1902The Carnegie Institution was founded in Washington, D.C. with a $10 million gift from Andrew Carnegie

1909 United States troops leave Cuba with the exception of Guantanamo Bay Naval Base after being there since the Spanish-American War. 

1912  Jackson Pollock, American, was born.

1915 An act of the U.S. Congress created the United States Coast Guard.

USCG S W.svg

1916 Louis D. Brandeis becomes the first Jew appointed to the United States Supreme Court. 

 

1917 Municipally owned streetcars began operating in the streets of San Francisco, California. 

1918  Harry Corbett, English puppeteer (Sooty), was born.

 

1921 A symbolic Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was installed beneath the Arc de Triomphe to honor the unknown dead of World War I.

Unknownsoldier paris.jpg

1922 Knickerbocker Storm, Washington D.C.’s biggest snowfall, causes the city’s greatest loss of life when the roof of the Knickerbocker Theater collapses. 

1929 Acker Bilk, English jazz clarinetist, was born.

1933 – The name Pakistan was coined by Choudhary Rehmat Ali Khan and is accepted by the Indian Muslims who then thereby adopted it further for the Pakistan Movement seeking independence.1934 The first ski tow in the United States begins operation in Vermont.

1935 David Lodge, English author, was born.

1935 Iceland became the first Western country to legalize therapeutic abortion.

1936 Alan Alda, American actor, writer, and director, was born.

1938 The World Land Speed Record on a public road was broken by driver Rudolf Caracciola in the Mercedes-Benz W195 at a speed of 432.7 kilometres per hour (268.9 mph).

Caracciola sits on what appears to be the back of a vehicle. A young woman sits in front of him.

1943 Dick Taylor, English musician (The Rolling Stones and The Pretty Things), was born.

1944 Susan Howard, American actress, was born.

1955 Nicolas Sarkozy, President of France, was born.

1958The Lego company patented their design of Lego bricks.

The logo for Lego, and the Lego group.

1964 A U.S. Air Force jet training plane that strayed into East Germany  was shot down by Soviet fighters near Erfurt ; all 3 crew men are killed. 

1965  The current design of the Flag of Canada was chosen by an act of Parliament

See adjacent text.

1977 The first day of the Great Lakes Blizzard of 1977, which severely affected and crippled much of Upstate New York, but Buffalo, NY, Syracuse, NY, Watertown, NY, and surrounding areas are most affected, each area accumulating close to 10 feet of snow on this one day.

1980 USCGC Blackthorn (WLB-391) collided with the tanker Capricorn while leaving Tampa Florida and capsizes killing 23 Coast Guard crewmembers.

USCGC-Blackthorn-WLB-391.jpg

 

1980  – Nick Carter, American singer (Backstreet Boys), was born.

1981 Ronald Reagan lifted remaining domestic petroleum price and allocation controls in the United States helping to end the 1979 energy crisis and begin the 1980s oil glut.1981 Elijah Wood, American actor, was born.

1982 US Army general James L. Dozier was rescued by Italian anti-terrorism forces from captivity by the Red Brigades

 

1985 Supergroup USA for Africa (United Support of Artists for Africa) records the hit single We Are the World, to help raise funds for Ethiopian famine relief.

1986 Space Shuttle Challenger broke apart after liftoff killing all seven astronauts on board. 

 

2002 TAME Flight 120, a Boeing 727-100 crashed in the Andes mountains in southern Colombia killing 92. 

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


December 7 in history

07/12/2009

On December 7:

521 Saint Columba, Irish Christian missionary to Scotland, was born.

1732  The Royal Opera House opens at Covent Garden, London.

1863 Richard Sears, American department store founder, was born.

1888 Joyce Cary, Irish author, was born.

1900 Max Planck discovered the law of black body emission.

1921 Pramukh Swami Maharaj, Indian spiritual leader, was born.

1923  Ted Knight, American actor, was born.

1928 Noam Chomsky, American linguist and political writer was born.

 

1930 W1XAV in Boston, Massachusetts broadcast video from the CBS radio orchestra program, The Fox Trappers. The broadcast included the first television commercial in the United States, an advertisement for I.J. Fox Furriers, who sponsored the radio show.

1941 Attack on Pearl Harbor – The Imperial Japanese Navy attacked the US Pacific Fleet and its defending Army Air Forces and Marine air forces at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Because of the time difference due to the International Date Line, the events of December 8 occurred while the date was still December 7 to the east of this line.

Attack on Pearl Harbor Japanese planes view.jpg

1962 Prince Rainier III of Monaco revised the principality’s constitution, devolving some of his power to advisory and legislative councils.

1963 The Bassett Road machine gun murders  took place.

1970 The first ever general election on the basis of direct adult franchise was held in Pakistan for 313 National Assembly seats.

1972  Apollo 17, the last Apollo moon mission, was launched. The crew took the photograph known as “The Blue Marble” as they leave the Earth.

1975 Indonesia invaded East Timor.

1988 Yasser Arafat recognised the right of Israel to exist.

1995 The Galileo spacecraft arrives at Jupiter, a little more than six years after it was launched by Space Shuttle Atlantis during Mission STS-34.

Galileo Preparations - GPN-2000-000672.jpg

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


NZ tops Global Peace Index

03/06/2009

 New Zealand has topped the  Institute for Economics and Peace’s Global Peace Index .

dairy 1

The Institute is an Australian think tank dedicated to developing the inter-relationships between business, peace and economic development.
The results of the 2009 survey  suggest:
that the world has become slightly less peaceful in the past year, which appears to reflect the intensification of violent conflict in some countries and the effects of both the rapidly rising food and fuel prices early in 2008 and the dramatic global economic downturn in the final quarter of the year. Rapidly rising unemployment, pay freezes and falls in the value of house prices, savings and pensions is causing popular resentment in many countries, with political repercussions that have been registered by the GPI through various indicators measuring safety and security in society.
 
The GPI uses 23 indicators  of the existence or absence of peace, divided into three broad categories:  measures of ongoing domestic and international conflict, measures of safety and security in society and measures of militarization.
The Top 10 countries were: New Zealand, Denmark, Norway, Iceland, Austria, Sweden, Japan, Canada, Finland and Slovenia.
At the bottom were: Georgia, Zimbabwe, Russia, Pakistan, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan, Israel, Somalia, Afghaanistan and Iraq.
The full list is here.

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