Rural round-up

August 10, 2014

Transformation reaps top award – Annette Scott:

David Crutchley used to feel he was a lone voice but his rise to the top in the inaugural Green Agriculture Innovation Awards has transformed that loneliness to fame. He talked to Annette Scott.

David Crutchley might be familiar to many as a champion dog trialist on the popular 1980s television series A Dog’s Show.

Now he has won fame in the inaugural Green Agriculture Innovation Awards (GAIA) for innovation in pastoral transition.

Crutchley was the supreme winner of the awards.

The humble high-country farmer achieved ground-breaking results finding a profitable way to support growing family enterprises.

“The farm was dead,” he says. . .

Late planting of crops will cause shortages – Heather Chalmers:

Canterbury arable farmers will be hoping for favourable conditions in coming weeks to get a backlog of crops in the ground, months later than usual.

Record wet, boggy conditions in autumn prevented many farmers from planting autumn-sown cereals, with the delayed planting expected to impact on yields come harvest time, says Federated Farmers South Island grain and seed vice-chairman David Clark.

Farmers on heavy soils in the Mid-Canterbury districts of Eiffelton and Wakanui as well as parts of South Canterbury were unable to get machinery on to paddocks for autumn sowing. . .

Demo farm stays on course – Tim Cronshaw:

A lower milk payout will leave little “wiggle room” for the Lincoln University demonstration dairy farm to reach planned targets under its self-imposed tightening of nitrogen losses, following its bumper profit last season.

Under a milk payment of $8.40 a kilogram of milksolids the Lincoln University Dairy Farm achieved a record $1 million result in 2013-14. This result is after farm expenses were removed but is slightly skewed as it is a demonstration farm and normally some of this return would be taken by tax, investment capital, debt, drawings and dividends.

Another $100,000 would have been added had its managers not committed to limiting nitrogen losses. . .

Dairy production for China begins – Jasmine O’Donoghue:

Pactum Dairy Group (Pactum) and China’s Bright Dairy has begun initial production of U+, which is to be shipped to China as a part of the duo’s strategic supply agreement.

The 250mL dairy product U+, will be the first Australian based high quality dairy product manufactured for a major Chinese dairy company under its own brand.

U+ will be marketed on Australia’s reputation for high quality dairy product, and will be launched in China in August. . .

2015 ANZ Young Farmer Contest Season Opens:

Young Farmers from around the country will be sharpening their agricultural skills over the coming weeks and months as entries are now open for the 2015 season of the ANZ Young Farmer Contest.

The season is set to launch in Taupo Friday 3rd October with the first district final, Bay of Plenty, held Saturday 4th October in Tihoi.

District finals run from October to December and are the entry level for the ANZ Young Farmer Contest. Entry is open and free to all paid members of New Zealand Young Farmers between the ages of 15-31 (entrants must be under 31 years of age at 1st January 2015). Competition hopefuls can enter online at www.youngfarmers.co.nz . . .

It's over and out from national office for the weekend. Here's a Friday funny to put a smile on the dial :-)


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