Some chances should go by

22/07/2013

The song says never let a chance go by . . .  and the Green Party obviously follows that advice.

Keeping Stock has a graphic over the name of Green Party MP Gareth Hughes making political capital out of the Cook Strait earthquakes.

If the  party eschewed all forms of transport fuelled by fossil fuels the message would have some credence.

But they’re prepared to use fuel from all sorts of places, many of which will have far lower safety and environmental standards than New Zealand so this is just a particularly opportunistic form of NIMBYism.
They’ll use fuel from someone else’s backyard but do their best to stop the economic growth and jobs which would come from extraction in ours.
There are some chances which should go by and this opportunity for a cheap political shot was one of them.

The upside of high $

02/05/2013

Petrol prices fell 12 cents during April and could drop below $2 a litre according to the Automobile Association.

The price of 91 octane petrol fell to $2.05 per litre in the main centres, while diesel fell 10 cents per litre to $1.42 a litre at most service stations, the lowest price since July 2012.
 
“Since mid-March, petrol prices have fallen 16 cents per litre, and diesel 13 cents. In all, fuel prices have fallen on seven consecutive occasions, the most number of sustained drops since June 2012,” says AA PetrolWatch spokesperson Mark Stockdale.
 
“However, the AA’s monitoring of commodity prices shows that since the last retail price increase in mid-February, the imported cost of petrol has fallen nearly 19 cents per litre, and diesel 16 cents. That means fuel companies have not passed all of the lower costs onto motorists, although some service stations have discounted prices below $2 a litre.”
 
This time last year we were paying $2.20 a litre for 91 petrol and $1.57 a litre for diesel, meaning motorists buying 40 litres of petrol today will be saving about $6 a time, or about $158 a year for a typical 2-litre car.
 
“International fuel prices have been consistently falling due to lower global demand, and increased supply as refinery production comes back after shutting down for maintenance,” Mr Stockdale said.
 
“Although in the last few days oil prices have risen slightly, at current trends there is a good chance the price of 91 octane petrol will fall below $2 a litre soon, the first time since June and July last year,” Mr Stockdale added.

The value of our dollar also plays a role in the price of fuel.

The upside of the higher exchange rate which makes export prices more expensive is that it makes imports cheaper.

LabourGreen say they’ll bring the value of the dollar down.

Bigger economies than ours have tried to do that with no success and at a very high cost.

If they did succeed it would immediately devalue everyone’s purchasing power as the cost of essential imports, including fuel, would rise.


Opposition nothing but nimbyism

16/01/2012

I’d have a lot more respect for  people who don’t want any oil exploration near New Zealand if they didn’t use oil or its by-products.

Since they do the opposition appears to be nimbyism – they’re happy to use oil from somewhere else but greet the prospect of exploration here with a “not in my backyard”.


Buying local good but not for oil?

12/04/2011

A review of the way the Dunedin City Council manages its $1.9 million vehicle fleet includes a recommendation to drop the buy-local policy.

Existing policy required the council to buy goods and services from Dunedin suppliers where possible, if the purchase price was under $50,000, which meant a variety of Dunedin dealerships were supported, the review found. . .

The review acknowledged an end to the buy-local policy “will be unpopular with local dealerships”, as the policy aimed to support the continued viability of Dunedin businesses.

However, the council also had to minimise costs for ratepayers.

“In this regard, unless local vehicle dealerships can ‘meet the market’ or at least be within an acceptable range, it will be impossible to achieve both objectives.”

On the face of it a council supporting local businesses make sense. They pay rates, buy goods and services from other businesses which pay rates and employ people who pay rates all of which fund the council.

There is also a question over whether buying local does actually cost more:

The peer review of the original Management Toolbox review had been conducted by FleetSmart, which provided fleet management services to the council, and its findings contradicted some of those in the original review.

That included the suggestion the council should end its buy-local policy, as the peer review questioned whether doing so would achieve further savings, he said.

If everything else is equal using local dealers could be the best option.

But if buying local is more expensive then ratepayers are effectively subsidising the businesses.

Apropos of buying local, this catch-cry of environmentalists doesn’t appear to apply to oil:

Greenpeace climate campaigner Steve Abel said protesters were sending an “emphatic message” to the Government that deep sea oil drilling would not be tolerated in the country’s waters.

Protests like this one against Petrobras which is surveying in the Raukumara Basin off East Cape are very good publicity for the protestors but they are misguided.

They’d be better putting their energy into ensuring there are safeguards to protect against environmental ill effects if drilling eventuates.

That way we might be able to buy local fuel without any unacceptable risks to the quality of our water.


Oil’s okay if it helps the protest?

11/04/2011

How did the people protesting against oil exploration by Petrobras off the East Cape get out to the survey ship?

Did they walk, cycle or ride horses to the beach then row, sail or swim from the shore?

Thought not.

That sends the somewhat confused message that using oil is okay if it helps the protest against finding more.


June quarter trade deficit up

28/07/2008

The seasonally adjusted trade deficit  increased to $1.9 billion for the three months to June, up from $861 million in the March quarter.

Statistics NZ says this is similar to the deficit in the June quarter last year.

Major contributers to the deficit were siginificant increase in imports of one-off capital goods (particularly oil-related) and petroleum and products, combined with a large seasonally adjusted drop in dairy exports.

The seasonally adjusted value of merchandise imports rose 8.5 percent in the June 2008 quarter (to $12.1 billion) following a flat March quarter. One-off capital imports (an oil platform, oil production vessel, and two large aircraft) were the largest contributors to this increase, added to by the highest ever quarterly value of petroleum and products imports.

The seasonally adjusted value of merchandise exports was down 0.5 percent in the June 2008 quarter (to $10.3 billion) following a 2.4 percent decrease in the March quarter. Although lower, June 2008 still has the third highest quarterly exports value on record. The latest small decrease in total exports comes despite increases in most commodity groups and is primarily the result of a large drop in dairy product exports, following on from the recent drought. Crude oil showed the most significant increase, up 56.6 percent (largely due to price rises).

In the month of June 2008, merchandise imports were valued at $3.8 billion, the highest value for a June month, up 16.9 percent from June 2007. This increase was led by crude oil with the price of crude up substantially since June 2007.

Merchandise exports were valued at $3.6 billion in June 2008, up 30.9 percent from June 2007. This is the largest percentage increase from the same month of the previous year since January 2001. The increase in exports was dominated by crude oil and milk powder, butter and cheese.  


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