Rural round-up

01/01/2021

Roll on 2021  – Rural News editorial:

There is no doubt that 2020 has been a challenging year for New Zealand and the world.

However, despite this, our country’s farmers have soldiered on doing what they do best – farming!

The country’s farmers stepped up during the lockdown, as an important part of New Zealand’s essential services, adapted quickly and kept on farming despite the constraints.

If there is one good thing to come out of Covid-19, it has further emphasised the vitally important role that the agriculture sector plays in NZ. At a time when other major sectors have been adversely affected, farming is playing – and continues to play – an increasingly vital role as a source of income and employment for the country. . .

2020: a most unusual year – Colin Miller:

2020: It definitely has been a most unusual year!

“Who would have thought / I never would have thought…” really sums up our year rather accurately, don’t you think?

Quarantines, social distancing, bubbles and masks were certainly not words on people’s lips, or in the media, when 2020 broke in on us January 1. For the sports fans; who would have thought the Warriors would need to be based in Aussie or drop right out of the comp?

Who would have thought that Super Rugby would be shut down this year, and then the All Blacks would also need to be based across the creek? And, whoever would have thought games would get played with no spectators – before empty grandstands! . . 

Long service to cattle industry :

ONZM

DENIS AITKEN

Dunedin

For services to the dairy industry and the community

Denis Aitken has always believed in paying it forward.

The Dunedin man appointed an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit said he was “gobsmacked” to hear the news.

“I’m pretty humbled … I do enjoy helping the community. . . 

Wanaka woman forestry scholar – Yvonne O’Hara:

Maude Rogers decided earlier this year that she wanted a career in forestry science.

The Wanaka teenager could see it taking her all over the world or working as a sector researcher for the Ministry for Primary Industries.

She was delighted when she was named as one of eight recipients to be awarded a 2021 Nga Karahipi Uru Rakau forestry scholarship .

The scholarship provided $8000 a year for four years, and was designed to encourage more women and Maori to enter New Zealand’s forestry and wood processing sectors. . .

Scholarship allows dream career in beekeeping to take flight :

A Bay of Plenty teen has been given a boost into his dream career in beekeeping after receiving the 2020 Apiculture New Zealand Ron Mossup Youth Scholarship.

Ohope-based Angus Brenton-Rule says he was thrilled to receive the scholarship which provides $2000 to support training and set up costs for new beekeepers, a one-year membership to Apiculture NZ (ApiNZ) and attendance at ApiNZ’s national industry conference.

“I was really, really happy to get it. I didn’t expect it, but I thought I might have had a small chance since I’ve been studying apiculture and fascinated by bees most of my life,” he said.

Brenton-Rule’s childhood interest in bees began with watching YouTube videos of hives in action, and then he got a taste of the real thing when some family friends started beekeeping.

Woola raises €450k to replace bubble wrap with sheep wool:

We’re excited to announce we’ve just closed an investment round of 450 000 euros led by Ragnar Sass, the co-founder of Pipedrive and Lift99. He was joined by Pipedrive co-founder Martin Tajur, Bolt co-founder Martin Villig, Klaus co-founder Kair Käsper, business angel fund Lemonade Stand, Karina Univer through the Atomico Angel Programme, ex JPMorgan Alejandro Jimenez, and a few other angel investors.

Woola takes the waste of one industry – leftover wool – and uses it to solve the waste problem of another – online shopping. Most online stores use plastic bubble wrap to ship fragile items, adding to the global plastic pollution problem.

  • More than 100 billion parcels are shipped every year globally, commonly packed in bubble wrap. Bubble wrap degrades in 500-1000 years and is a large polluter of ocean life. . .


Rural honours

13/01/2016

The New Years Honours list included several awards to rural people.

Oamaru-born and Hakataramea raised, Richie McCaw was awarded the New Zealand Order of Merit.

Champion shearer David Fagan became Te Kuiti’s second knight:

. . . “Obviously we’ve got the main man, Sir Colin Meads. We’re all very proud of Colin and what he’s done,” said Sir David. . . 

Sir David received a Knight Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit on the 2016 New Year’s honours list for services to shearing.

He’s a 16 times Golden Shears champion, living legend, household name, former shearing contractor, farmer, 1999 Member and 2007 Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit, 10 times world record holder and a terrific bloke.

The 54-year old’s longevity in the gruelling sport would have the best commentators gushing with superlatives.

Blow after blow down the woolly flanks of thousands of sheep, litres of sweat soaked into hundred of black singlets and hour upon hour with back arched over ewe, ram and lamb – Sir David’s feats have been called incredible and amazing.

His first New Zealand Golden Shears win was in 1986 and he reigned supreme from 1990 to 2001 winning 12 straight titles. . . 

Sports writer Joseph Romanos writes:

Fagan won 16 Golden Shears crowns (the Wimbledon of his sport), plus 11 world titles. . . 

I once asked farmer and former All Black captain Brian Lochore how shearing compared with rugby as a sport.

“Shearing at the pace they do in competition is very, very difficult,” he said. “There’s the hand-eye co-ordination and the whole body has to be working.

“You’re holding the sheep with your legs and your concentration has to be full-on. At that speed, if you make one slip, you’re gone.

“It’s physically very gruelling and then having to bend over like that makes it even tougher. David Fagan is up there with our greatest sportsmen.”

Fagan has been a superlative competitor, always able to find a way to win – the mark of a champion. . . 

From Shearing Sports NZ:

A wave of global congratulation has followed the announcement that Te Kuiti shearing legend David Fagan became a Knight in the New Year Honours.

Shearing Sports New Zealand’s first facebook post soon after the Thursday 5am announcement, confirming its chairman is now Sir David Fagan, reached 2000 people in less than an hour before most of New Zealand had awoken to the news, and more than 40,000 in less than 48 hours.

The regard for the five times World individual champion and winner of 642 finals in an international Open-class competition career spanning 33 years, was highlighted by Wales team manager Martyn David, soon to bring a team to New Zealand.

Almost 150 of the wins were in the UK, where Sir David, 54, bowed-out in a 2-all drawn series against Wales last July. . . 

John Lee  became a Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit:

John Lee has devoted his life to ensuring a sustainable future for his beloved Cardrona Valley.

That dedication has been rewarded with the highest New Year Honour for an Otago person this year, with Mr Lee (79) being made a Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

Now living in Wanaka, Mr Lee said he had long been fascinated by the valley’s rich gold-mining heritage. But he regretted the gold extracted had been taken from the district, most likely heading north to benefit Auckland.

As a young farmer, he vowed every dollar he could get his hands on would be invested back into the valley, Mr Lee said.

That aim has been realised in the form of his successful snow-based businesses in the valley, which help underpin the local economies of Queenstown and Wanaka, injecting millions of dollars annually. . . 

Brian Anderton became an Officer of the NZ Order of Merit:

Mr Anderton (78) was born to be involved in thoroughbred racing.

His father Hector and mother Alice were household names in thoroughbred racing across New Zealand and Mr Anderton rode his first winner, White Robe, when he was aged just 13.

He started his stud, White Robe Lodge, in Wingatui six years later, then moved it to North Taieri in 1981, where he and son Shane still train.

The pair have trained 815 winners together, after teaming up in the 1993-94 season. Mr Anderton won 608 races before the partnership, having gained his licence to train in the 1967-68 season. . . 

Andrew McEwen was recognised for his services to forestry:

The New Zealand Institute of Forestry (NZIF) is pleased to note the recognition of the importance of forestry within the New Year Honours list. Andrew McEwen, immediate past president of NZIF received an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to forestry.

“Andrew has worked tirelessly to promote the benefits of forestry for all of New Zealand” says President of NZIF James Treadwell.

“Throughout his career Andrew has informed and promoted the direct and wider benefits of all forms of forestry. He has long championed the need for better scientific understanding and professional management of the role of forestry, whether for conservation and biodiversity values of native forests or as plantation-sourced climate friendly and renewable fuel, packaging or building materials.” . . 

Jonathon Kirk  was made a Member of the NZ Order of Merit  for services of agriculture:

. . .The 65-year-old Waimate farmer was ‘‘absolutely amazed and quite honoured” to have been recognised in the New Year Honours.

In 1998, Mr Kirk invented the K-Line Spray Irrigation System – a flexible pipe with a series of plastic pods housing sprinkler nozzles that could be towed behind a vehicle.

Previous schemes, such as the border dyke irrigation system, had been inefficient and often wasteful of water, he said.

He saw an opportunity to develop a low-cost option, particularly suited to farms that were not suitable for a centre pivot or travelling irrigators. . . 

Lindy Nelson became a Member of the NZ Order of Merit:

. . .Narrowing down who nominated her wouldn’t be easy, as the Agri-Women’s Development Trust she founded and is the executive director of has changed many lives. 

The trust works to develop leadership, business and governance competencies of women in New Zealand agriculture.

Nelson said the idea for the trust came from her own life experience, marrying a farmer and living in a rural community. 

She noticed a lack of women in agricultural leadership roles and when she started researching said she met some amazing women, but also some who didn’t appreciate and recognise the skills they had and how they could be utilised. 

So she officially launched the trust in 2010 and spent the following two years working upwards of 80 hours a week as an unpaid executive to help create the programmes  and bringing strategic partners on board.  . . 

 


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