Rural round-up

August 9, 2019

Plans to expand dairy farm school into Oamaru – Gus Patterson:

It will not just be pilots training at Oamaru Airport next year.

The National Trade Academy (NTA) has announced plans to establish a dairy farm school at the airport, next to the NTA-affiliated New Zealand Airline Academy.

The dairy farm school, which is expected to become operational next March, will take up to 11 students in each intake and teach them the basics of dairy farming during a 12 week course, getting them ready to fill the labour shortages on farms in Canterbury and Otago.

Initially, the school would aim to train between 30 and 40 students a year, with a classroom at the airport and surrounding farms used for practical aspects, NTA managing director Craig Musson said. . .

Big turnout and ‘fabulous’ response to Will to Live tour – Yvonne O’Hara:

The importance of ”speaking up” when feeling depressed or down, is emphasised at each of Elle Perriam’s Will to Live Speak Up meetings, two of which were held in Winton and Balclutha last week.

Ms Perriam’s boyfriend Will Gregory took his own life in 2017.

She, her sisters Kate and Sarah and others, raised money to undertake a tour of nearly 20 small rural venues throughout New Zealand to promote the importance of ”speaking up” about mental health issues.

Will’s dog Jess is the tour’s mascot. . .

Cadet scheme gets started in Northland – Hugh Stringleman:

Northland livestock farmers have been challenged to offer farm cadetships to address what they say is a persistent problem of unfilled farming vacancies.

Whangarei A&P Society has devised a modern live-in, on-farm training course called a farm intern programme and 50 farmers have responded, 20 of them willing to start next year.

“Northland farmers say they can’t find trained farm staff so this is their opportunity to do something about it,” society manager Chris Mason said.

The new course was conceived by the A&P Society with input from former Federated Farmers field officer and agricultural tutor Malcolm Fuller and the resources of NZ Land-Based Training, an established private education provider in Whanganui.  . . 

What beyond meat investors should know – Richard Berman:

Following its initial public offering (IPO) in May, the alternative meat company Beyond Meat has seen its stock skyrocket. This week, the share price climbed past $230, putting the company’s valuation above $13 billion, as the market anticipated its upcoming quarterly earnings. That’s billion with a “B,” as they say. 

Here’s another “B” word: Beware. Despite all of the hype, there’s a soft side to Beyond Meat’s underbelly. 

Beyond Meat’s valuation is greater than the entire U.S. market for all plant-based foods — which are produced by dozens of companies. It’s also bigger than Wendy’s, Shake Shack, Red Robin and Jack in the Box— combined. This is perplexing given that, in the words of one analyst, Beyond Meat is merely “a small maker of fake-meat hamburgers and hot dogs.” The company reported $67 million in sales and $6.6 million in losses last quarter after a decade in business. . .

Unique farming technique brings splash of colour :

A Yorkshire farmer has used a unique farming technique to turn 74-acres of his land into an impressive wildflower woodland.

A picture perfect swathe of wildflowers has swept across farmland close to York, but the scene does not tell the whole story.

The flowers are blooming as the result of Alwyn Craven and his mother, who own more than 120-acres of land at Home Farm, at Huby, and are turning most of it over to nature.

As well as planting hundreds of trees, they are using a technique known as “soil inversion” – using a one metre deep plough to turn over the soil burying weed seeds and fertile soil. . .

Leaft Foods announces plans to produce protein from leafy crops:

• Plant protein ingredients company, Leaft Foods has been launched in Canterbury by Dr John Leyland Penno and Maury Leyland Penno

• Leaft Foods are combining existing and new technology with the aim of producing a range of high value leaf protein concentrate ingredients for leading food companies around the world

• The paddock to product business seeks to play a role in agricultural sector transformation, partnering with farmers to reduce on-farm net emissions, targeting nitrogen and methane. . . 

 


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