Rural round-up

May 14, 2014

Fonterra says price gap between milk powder vs casein and cheese is easing:

(BusinessDesk) – Fonterra Cooperative Group, which posted a 53 percent drop in first-half profit as gains in prices of milk powder ran ahead of products such as casein and cheese, says the gap is becoming less pronounced – a sign that pressure on margins may ease.

Prices of reference commodity prices used to calculate the farmgate milk price– whole and skim milk powder, butter milk powder, butter and anhydrous milk fat – rose 44 percent to $5,981 a tonne in the third quarter while non-reference product prices, cheese and casein, rose 22 percent to $7,499 a tonne.

That’s a smaller gap than in the first quarter, when prices gained 62 percent and 22 percent respectively, the Auckland-based company said in its latest global dairy update.

Last November, Fonterra took a $157 million provision against inventory of specialised ingredients and branded consumer products produced by its NZ Milk Products division because rising input costs squeezed margins. In March this year, it posted a slump in first-half earnings as gross margin shrank to 12.5 percent from 18.6 percent. . . .

Zespri’s regular claim has scientific backing – Richard Rennie:

Zespri can stand by the claim its green kiwifruit variety helps keep humans regular, at least on the inside.

The kiwifruit marketer has added a health angle to its marketing, saying its green kiwifruit contribute to regular bowel function.

While health claims can be made at different levels, Zespri’s is backed by 10 years of clinical trial data and literature reviews by independent scientists.

Zespri is seeking recognition from Food Standards Australia-New Zealand on the benefits of green kiwifruit for healthy bowel function.

Zespri global marketing manager Veronique Parmentier said the claim was the first lodged in the world for fresh fruit. . .

New security check list for rural communities:

The Police have released a checklist to help rural New Zealanders consider the security of their farm or property.

The checklist poses questions about a range of security measures and environmental factors concerning properties, and provides the respondent with a security score at the end.

Inspector Glyn Rowland, of the NZ Police National Prevention Centre, said although there is less recorded crime in rural areas, crime does happen. . .

The check list is here.

AgInnovation events in full swing at Feilding:

It’s all go at Manfeild Park in Feilding, where Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s annual AgInnovation event is in full swing.

The four day programme pulls together what used to be a range of separate activities, culminating in the bull beef sales on Wednesday.

Beef genetics and breeding were the initial focus of the AgInnovation conference which opened on Sunday.

But more than 40 speakers will be covering sheep as well as beef issues over the two days. . .

Certification of nutrient management advisers – the icing on the cake:

 The Nutrient Management Adviser Certification process has now been available for six months and has achieved an impressive level of uptake. To date there are more than 40 certified advisers in the field, with another 60 currently in application phase.

Jason Griffin, Ballance Agri-Nutrients key and corporate accounts manager for the lower North Island, described the certification programme as “the icing on the cake” which brings together years of training and experience in nutrient management. He is grateful that the certification programme is available to formalise the level of knowledge and skills involved in effective nutrient management, and to ensure farmers are receiving advice from qualified people.

Likewise, Sue Quilter, Ravensdown key account manager for the East Coast of the North Island said “after 16 years in the field I found the certification process a valuable experience”. . . .

Jacobs Highlights Irrigation Lessons Learned at 2014 Irrigation New Zealand Conference and Expo

Representatives from Jacobs* attended the 2014 Irrigation New Zealand Conference and Expo recently held in Hawkes Bay, presenting a paper focused on lessons learned from irrigation modernisation projects undertaken in the Australian state of Victoria.

The presentation described work Jacobs is doing on the Goulburn-Murray Water Connections Project (GMWCP) in northern Victoria. The objective of the A$2 billion project is to improve the irrigation delivery efficiency and achieve water savings by rationalising and modernising out-dated irrigation systems.

The GMWCP to date has focused upon:
• automation and upgrading of regulating structures in channels
• remodelling and lining of the delivery channels
• construction of pipelines to replace small spur channels or facilitate rationalisation of spur channel systems, and
• automation and accuracy upgrades for metered outlets to farms . .


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