Rural round-up

November 27, 2019

Australian pair are here to learn – Sally Rae:

When 2019 Zanda McDonald Award joint winners Shannon Landmark and Luke Evans visited Omarama last week, it truly was a flying visit.

The Australian pair flew into the Waitaki Valley township on a Pilatus aircraft that had been chauffeuring them around the country on a mentoring trip, as part of their prize package.

The Australasian agribusiness award was launched by the Platinum Primary Producers (PPP) Group in 2014, in memory of Australian beef industry leader and PPP foundation member Zanda McDonald, who died in 2013 after an accident at his Queensland property. . .

Seaweed products pioneer named supreme winner in rural women business awards – Angie Skerrett:

A company that has pioneered the use of seaweed products has won the supreme award in this year’s NZI Rural Women NZ Business Awards. 

The annual awards celebrate and showcase entrepreneurship and innovation by rural women.

At a function in the Banquet Hall at Parliament, AgriSea Business Development Manager Clare Bradley accepted the supreme award for the Paeroa-based family business.  . . 

AgriSea specialises in the manufacture of macro-algae concentrates and bioactive extractions to add high-value nutrition for soil, plant, animal and human health.  . . 

Seeking sustainability at scale – Neal Wallace:

Ross and Jo Hay are typical of thousands of young farming couples who work hard and continually search for a chance to grow and get ahead. Neal Wallace met the North Otago couple to find out how they are establishing their careers. 

Ross and Jo Hay are not oblivious to the uncertainty associated with the clouds of rules looming on the farming horizon but they have decided to take a glass half full approach.

Fuelled with enthusiasm and determination to pursue a farming career the Hays are confident there will be opportunity among the plethora of Government rules bearing down on the sector.

“People got through the 1980s,” Ross says. . .

Blueberry picking looms – Abbey Palmer:

As leaves fall and berries begin to change from green to blue, Southland’s only blueberry farm is gearing up for another season of hand-picked fun.

With 220 hectares of land planted in bushes, Otautau’s Blueberry Country will be opening its gates to the public this summer for the eight-week season.

Blueberry Country general manager Simon Bardon said the 10 staff members were hoping to be able to welcome visiting pickers from early January through till the end of February.

“One of the best parts of blueberry picking season is seeing all of the families out and kids knackered from running up and down the orchards,” Mr Bardon said. . .

 

Happy Cow Diaries part 4: We’re back, and ready to take on industrial dairying – Glen Herud:

Happy Cow Milk is poised to relaunch with a new business model and an invention that could revolutionise dairy production, explains founder Glen Herud, in the latest instalment of his Spinoff series documenting the company’s fall and rise again.

Just as we were chilling the beers for our equity crowdfunding launch last Thursday we crossed the line. We cracked those beers instead, because by the time I got home we had fulfilled our target of raising $400,000. After months of work it was a huge relief to reach our goal, and we did it in just 8 hours and 8 minutes.

It was a rare day of success in what sometimes feels like an endless start-up slog. The best part for me is the confirmation that New Zealanders are ready for change. They want solutions that reduce emissions, look after animals, protect waterways and reduce plastics. And they want to connect with farmers and food production in a more positive way . .

Staring into oblivion: People of the drought lands watch their world disappear – Rob Harris:

It’s 5.45am in Casino, just over an hour’s drive inland from Byron Bay in northern NSW, and the smoke from weeks of bushfires lingers, casting a gloomy haze over the sunrise.

The early shift at the town’s meat works has filed in and the piercing noise of an electric hand saw cutting its way through carcass after carcass drowns out the Monday morning chatter.

The Northern Co-operative Meat Company is the town’s biggest private employer with 1000 people – 10 per cent of Casino’s population – relying on a constant flow of cattle to make ends meet. . .


Rural round-up

August 18, 2014

The circus of foreign ownership – Dr William Rolleston:

The Election has suddenly sparked into life. It was not a policy, a pratfall or a stunt, but Shanghai Pengxin Group’s Overseas Investment Office (OIO) application to buy Lochinver Station.

While Federated Farmers has taken the principled position of trying to learn what the ‘substantial and identifiable benefit’ to New Zealand is of this proposed sale, others have gone off the proverbial deep end.  National has been far too dismissive of concerns being raised in some quarters. Labour has gone to the opposite end by announcing they’d block the sale, along with the Greens.  Meanwhile, NZ First will go further and stop all foreign sales of New Zealand farmland.  That seems to be the position of Colin Craig, who stepped into Mr Peters shoes by breaking this story.

What everyone seems to have forgotten is process.  Our overseas investment rules are meant to operate on fair play under the guise of the OIO.  Instead, it has turned into an election political circus. The coverage of which, has gone global, given the media who have contacted me. . .

Meat and fibre’s time to shine – Rick Powdrell:

Boy oh boy, doesn’t it feel good to be a sheep and beef farmer for once. Of course it wasn’t always that way.  We were the dairy industry for decades, almost as soon as the Dunedin slipped out of Port Chalmers in1882, we rode the sheep’s back.  The good times operated under a simple business model.  We grew meat and fibre and Britain needed it.

Through war and peace, these good times seemed destined to run forever.  Our success blinded us to what the bright sparks at companies like DuPont were doing.  That was until they ‘wool-jacked’ us with oil based fibres.  That wasn’t helped by lamb being seen in the 1970s as your grans’ meal. You could have lamb cooked anyway you wanted as long as it came in a roasting tin.  Other meats became trendier and in some instances, cheaper, while our industry was trapped in a Sunday roast.  . .

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Demand drops for malting barley – Annette Scott:

A shrinking number of Kiwi beer drinkers is creating less demand for malting barley.

As beer consumption falls, coupled with higher prices for New Zealand barley, breweries require less malt and malting companies less barley.

Marton-based malting company Malteurop NZ operations manager Tiago Cabral said New Zealanders’ drinking habits were having an impact on the company. . .

 

Worth sharing - thanks The Horse Mafia

NSW $10m beef deal with China – Roderick Makim:

NSW beef suppliers have secured a $10 million export deal to the Chinese market.

Producers including Andrews Meat Industries in Lidcombe and the Northern Co-operative Meat Company Ltd in Casino are among the NSW suppliers involved in the deal, Deputy Premier Andrew Stoner said today.

Mr Stoner announced the deal while visiting Hong Kong and Shenzhen for a three-day trade mission along with representatives from a range of NSW food companies. . . .


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