Rural round-up

05/09/2017

NOSLaM meeting: 

Randall Aspinall, from Mt Aspiring Station, will speak at a North Otago Sustainable Land Management Group meeting at Five Forks on Thursday.

He will discuss the challenges of being a high country farmer in the Wanaka area and share lessons that had been learned.

NOSLaM was revived several years ago by a group of farmers who were keen to improve water quality and promote good pastoral management practices. . .

Water scheme grew from ground up – Hamish MacLean,

In the 1950s, rural water schemes sprang up in North Otago but the 1989 local government reform, and then progressively stringent legislation aimed to improve drinking-water standards, started to take the control of water schemes away from the farmers who used them.

This winter, after a three-year trial, a community-led non-profit company signed a five-year agreement with the Waitaki District Council to manage four rural water schemes from the grass-roots, Hamish MacLean reports.

Corriedale Water Management Ltd was formed when the Waitaki District Council rewrote its water bylaw four years ago.

A “fundamental” philosophical difference separated the way its users wanted to operate and the way council-owned water schemes were expected to work, chairman Bill Malcolm, of Airedale, said. . .

Does OAD lift productivity?:

In their quest to increase six-week in-calf rates, a growing number of farmers are looking at once-a-day (OAD) milking as a way to improve herd reproductive performance. How effective is this strategy?

The success of taking this approach depends on how long cows are milked OAD before mating. It’s important to note that the benefits of whole-season (or full lactation) OAD on herd reproduction don’t necessarily translate to the use of short-term OAD milking around mating. . . 

Vivid flavones from a vivid country – Joelle Thomson:

Wine writer Jamie Goode says simplicity is key in communicating New Zealand wine to global markets.

The British blogger visited New Zealand to speak at the country’s second Organic and Biodynamic Winegrowing Conference in Marlborough in June this year. His message was emphatic.

“You will maintain an edge in international markets by sticking to a simple clear marketing message going forward in the same way as you have done in the past with Sauvignon Blanc from Marlborough. It’s consistent, reliable and there are no nasty surprises. . .

ExportNZ has released its manifesto for the 2017 election:

ExportNZ Executive Director Catherine Beard says exporting is critical for the economy and voters should choose a Government that supports trade.

“The single biggest policy issue is whether there is support for TPP-11 and other key potential trade deals. These have the best practical ability to grow jobs and incomes,” Catherine Beard said.
Exporters wanted to see a Government keeping the pressure off the New Zealand dollar by balancing the budget and keeping interest rates low through a focused target on inflation. . .

Export vital for New Zealand’s prosperity:

Support for TPP11 and the wider trade agenda by the incoming government is crucial for New Zealand now and in the future, says the EMA.

The need to speed up the growth of exporting was one of the key recommendations in the EMA 2017 Election Manifesto.

“As a nation we rely heaving on trade for jobs and growth. With a population the size of ours, we need a vibrant exporting sector for New Zealand’s prosperity, says Kim Campbell, CEO, EMA. . .


Rural round-up

23/05/2017

Farmer groups set out to improve water quality – Sally Rae:

A new project set up in North Otago is aimed at helping farmers learn about how their activities can impact onwater quality.

Seven small ”pods” of farmers are being set up. Their members are setting achievable goals to achieve better water quality and then taking action to reach them.

The initiative is part of the ”local solutions built by local people” approach being taken by North Otago Sustainable Land Management Group (Noslam).

The project was a good way for the community to work together to find solutions for water quality in the Kakanui catchment, spokeswoman Jane Smith said.

The Otago Regional Council supported the approach being taken to help farmers meet their obligations under the water plan, which gave them room to be innovative in their farming practices, as long as they did not harm water quality, she said. . . 

Salmon net sabotage will cost farm $150k – Lydia Anderson:

Staff at a South Island salmon farm have been left reeling after vandals cut one of its nets and released 6000 young salmon into the wild.

High Country Salmon, near Twizel, has lost about $150,000 in earnings after the 800g salmon were cut free on Friday night.

Manager John Jamieson said he got an urgent call on Saturday from his workers, saying that one of the the farm’s topline nets had been cut. . . 

Learning from Tillamook dairy – Keith Woodford:

This last week I have been in Tillamook, in Western Oregon. Together with three colleagues from Calder Stewart, I have been exploring the dairy systems here, to see what learnings we can bring back to New Zealand.

Tillamook is a high rainfall zone on the Pacific Coast and has much of the same feel about it as the West Coast of New Zealand.  It is one of the few places in the world where dairy cows can be grazed on perennial pastures, and using the same grass species as we use in New Zealand. The latitude is 45 degrees North, which is a latitudinal mirror image of Oamaru, Alexandra and South Westland.  But climatically, it Westland that is the best comparison. . . 

Fit for transport animal welfare app launched today:

The Ministry for Primary Industries has launched a mobile app that helps farmers, transporters, stock agents and veterinarians determine whether an animal is fit for transport.

Developed with industry and vets, the app is an easy and efficient tool to help people make the right decision for the welfare of animals. It consolidates available information in to one place and doesn’t require internet access, which makes it suitable for on-farm use. . . 

Erosion control funding round opens:

Associate Minister for Primary Industries Louise Upston has welcomed the opening of the next round of funding for erosion control in the Gisborne region.

The Ministry of Primary Industries’ Erosion Control Funding Programme (ECFP) helps eligible land owners in the region contain erosion and improve susceptible land.

Improvements were recently made to the programme, including providing upfront funding to reduce the financial burden for land owners and extending the land categories eligible for treatment. . . 

Tis the season… for calf rearing:

It’s the busiest time of the farming year.

Between July and October many dairy farmers will be run off their feet with calving. Up at the crack of dawn (or even earlier), checking cows and not finishing until well after the sun has gone down.

To help prepare their members for another busy season, Dairy Women’s Network are running their annual ‘Successful Calf Rearing’ workshops in the regions from late May through to early July. . . 

NZ log prices advance in ‘humming’ forestry sector, AgriHQ says – Tina Morrison

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand export log prices generally rose this month, as key fundamentals move in the country’s favour, AgriHQ said.

Prices lifted through all unpruned export log grades this month, while pruned logs experienced some minor weakness, according to AgriHQ’s monthly survey of exporters, forest owners and saw millers.

“The key fundamentals at the wharf gate have swung ever so slightly into NZ exporters’ favour,” AgriHQ analyst Reece Brick said in his report titled ‘Forestry sectors keeping humming’. . . 

Substantial pastoral station placed on the market for sale:

An expansive sheep and beef station has been placed on the market for sale. Waipaoa Station spreads across 1667 hectares some 58 kilometres north-west of Gisborne.

Waipaoa Station winters 16,500 stock units over 87 subdivided paddocks of easy-medium terrain, in conjunction with 358.5 hectares of adjoining leased pasture land subdivided into a further 12 paddocks. The property is being marketed for sale by Tender through Bayleys Gisborne – with tenders closing on June 16th 2017. . . 


Not just farmers fear Green influence

08/07/2014

Jon Morgan says farmers should fear Greens’ influence:

He’s right and they do.

Farming has moved a long way in the past few years and the current leadership of Federated Farmers gets some of the credit for that.

Instead of being defensive and/or belligerent  as previous administrations often were, they have accepted problems where they exist and worked hard to encourage farmers make improvements where they’re needed.

Farmers have been helped by improvements in monitoring and advice and further encouraged by meat and milk companies which are requiring much higher standards from their suppliers.

Where carrots haven’t worked, there are sticks. Regional Councils are imposing higher standards and taking a very strict approach to breaches of compliance.

In North Otago, at least, the return of farmers’ adult children in big numbers for the first time since the ag-sag of the 1980s has also helped bring fresh eyes and new approaches to farming practices.

The requirement for shareholders in North Otago Irrigation Company’s scheme to have environmental farm plans which are independently audited each year has helped focus farmers’ on their responsibility for care of the soil and water.

The resurrection of the North Otago Sustainable Land Management group has helped with education in best practice.

In spite of this most of the publicity about farming and the environment is negative and that’s what Green policy appears to be based on resulting in more restrictions and higher costs.

Mix that with Labour’s policies and throw in the influence of New Zealand First and Internet Mana and farmers are right to fear a change of government in which the Green party would have a say.

But it’s not just farmers – the rest of the country which eats the food they produce and benefits from the export income they earn should be just as worried.

Higher costs and lower productivity won’t help any of us.


Rural round-up

07/10/2013

Company proves it’s in the business of growth – Sally Rae:

At Mosgiel-based Superior Minerals, manager David Hoseason-Smith says it is ”not just about selling fertiliser”.

The company was recently named Otago and lower South Island regional winner in the fastest-growing manufacturer category in the Deloitte Fast 50.

Superior Minerals was established in 2001 to ”provide a point of difference” in the marketplace for solid fertiliser, director Lawrence Alloo said. . .

Donation helps get Noslam restarted:

A donation from the North Otago Irrigation Company (NOIC) will allow the newly re-established North Otago Sustainable Land Management Group (Noslam) to begin its vision for the district.

That vision is to create an integrated team approach to sustainable land and water quality management for the greater good of both farmers and the community.

In March last year, NOIC received an Irrigation New Zealand innovation award including cash prize of $2500 which, in turn, it has given to Noslam to be used as a seeding grant.

Noslam’s goals to promote a healthy environment with all North Otago farmers by identifying measures that secured and improved the environment and considered the economic and social issues and constraints, resonated strongly with the company, NOIC chief executive Robyn Wells said. . .

Farmer places clean-up faith in watercress – Matthew Littlewood:

A South Canterbury farmer hopes watercress could be used to help clean the area’s degraded catchment.

Rory Foley is working with Environment Canterbury on a project that  involves not only fencing and replanting alongside the streams on his Wainono property near Waimate, but also planting watercress in the stream itself.

”I’m really conscious of the environment, because I work on the land. I want to help improve the habitat for future generations, we have a responsibility to do so,” he said.

”We’ve lost a lot of the native wetlands, we need to restore them.” . . .

Wool NZ eyes market’s top end – Sue O’Dowd:

New Zealand’s new farmer-owned wool sales and marketing company is focusing on the luxury market.

“Our focus has to be on the top end of the market, on luxury,” Wools of New Zealand (WNZ) chief Ross Townshend told about 40 farmer shareholders at Stratford, the fifth stop on the company’s 17-venue roadshow.

Townshend, a foundation shareholder supplying the company with 20,000kg of wool a year from 2500 ewes on his north Waikato property, said as a commercial company, WNZ had to have a global focus so it could get value from its products.

He was responding to questions from Tarata sheep and beef farmer Bryan Hocken, who said he was running out of time to become a wool baron and was concerned at how difficult it was to buy a wool carpet in New Zealand. . .

Wool growers called on to be patient – Sally Rae:

Strong-wool growers have been urged to be patient as Wools of New Zealand continues its mission to improve the profitability of its grower shareholders.

A series of roadshows have been held throughout the country to give an update on the company’s progress since capitalisation was completed in March.

More than 700 applications for shares, totalling about $6 million, were received, allowing it to proceed with a grower-owned sales and marketing company. . .

Rural achiever to pit skills against Aussies – Jill Galloway:

It’s a good thing Cameron Lewis is in a talking competition, rather than a practical contest, he says.

But it pays to be multi-skilled all the same.

“It is like the Young Farmers contest, you have to be an all-rounder. Learn to shear sheep, fence and put machinery together. You have to put aside a few years to compete.”

Lewis won the National Royal Agricultural Society’s Young Rural Achiever Award at the RAS Conference in Christchurch. He was representing the Western District.

Now he’ll be up against winners from five Australian states. It is the Australasian final being held at the Royal Show hosted by the Manawatu Consortium at Manfeild Park in Feilding from December 6 to 8. . .

Aussie claims honours at merino champs – Lynda van Kempen:

An Australian shearer has claimed the New Zealand Merino Shearing Championship open title for the third year in a row.

Defending champion Damien Boyle, of Broomehill, Western Australia, won his third successive title by seven points ahead of Chris Vickers, of Palmerston, in the final staged in Alexandra last night

New Zealanders Tony Coster, Mana Te Whata, Charlie O’Neill and Nathan Stratford also made the final. . .

 


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