Dairy Industry Award winners

05/07/2020

The 2020 Dairy Industry Share Farmers of the Year winners demonstrate the perfect progression pathway:

The 2020 Share Farmers of the Year are an outstanding example of hard work, dedication and leadership who are honest, traditional and epitomise sharemilker progression planning.

Due to Covid-19 restrictions, a gala dinner to announce the winners was not possible, so another way was found to celebrate success within the dairy industry. For the first time ever, the New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards winners were announced on national television and aired on Country TV on Saturday night.

Nick and Rosemarie Bertram from Hawke’s Bay/Wairarapa were named the 2020 New Zealand Share Farmers of the Year, Bay of Plenty’s Andre Meier became the 2020 New Zealand Dairy Manager of the Year and Grace Gibberd from Waikato was announced the 2020 New Zealand Dairy Trainee of the Year. They shared prizes from a pool worth over $215,000.

Share Farmer head judge, Jacqui Groves from Westpac, says the Bertrams impressed the judges by remaining true to their vision, their mission and values in life. “They were high achievers in all areas.” . . 

The full results are here:

 


Rural round-up

20/06/2020

ETS will see more farmland lost – David Anderson:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) believes the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) will see huge swathes of productive farming land converted into trees for carbon farming.

It says there is no disincentive in the updated climate change policy to stop significant land use change away from productive and sustainable pastoral agriculture to exotic plantation forestry for the purpose of carbon farming.

The red meat lobby claims this failure will take the focus away from actually reducing fossil fuel emissions.

B+LNZ chief executive Sam McIvor says his organisation is concerned by the lack of government action to limit the amount of carbon farming available through the ETS to offset fossil fuel emissions.  . . 

Blocking MFAT advice on forestry bill ‘concerning’ says Initiative:

The Government’s refusal to let its skilled public servants advise a Select Committee about new legislation is “deeply concerning,” said The New Zealand Initiative.

Today, the Environment Select Committee published its final report on Minister Shane Jones’ Forests (Regulation of Log Traders and Forestry Advisers) Bill. Despite the Bill’s many flaws – and an unprecedented chorus of disapproval – it has emerged from the Select Committee largely unsubdued.

The Bill’s purported purpose is to create an occupational licensing regime for log traders and forestry advisers. It deems all forest owners to be “log traders,” thereby subjecting them to the registration and regulatory requirements of the new accreditation scheme. . . 

The ongoing search for new markets – India and beyond – Keith Woodford:

Finding new markets for NZ exports is challenging. Here, Keith Woodford looks at the Southern Asian countries of India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, and further west to Iran

In recent weeks I have been exploring opportunities for market diversification, given increasing concerns that New Zealand has become too dependant on China. I started by looking at China itself , with the key finding being that growth of two-way trade between New Zealand and China is a consequence of natural alignment for each other’s products, also facilitated by the 2008 Free Trade Agreement between the countries.

Next, I focused on other North-East Asian markets and specifically on Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. The challenges with all of those include that their populations are either declining or about to decline. Also, their economic growth had either stalled or nearly stalled even before COVID-19 came along. That means that new trade requires elbowing out existing products rather than meeting new economic demand from consumers. . .

Deer cull will help families in need :

Venison is on the menu for New Zealand families in need — an annual deer cull in Fiordland will provide meat for foodbanks.

The deer cull in Fiordland National Park will this year provide 18,000kg of venison to New Zealand foodbanks and families in need.

Fiordland Wapiti Foundation typically would remove up to 1000 animals during the cull, and this year partnered with Game Animal Council and the Department of Conservation (Doc) for the initiative.

Fiordland Wapiti Foundation president Roy Sloan said that, weather permitting, by the end of July 600 deer from Fiordland National Park would be removed for processing into 18,000 1kg wild venison mince packets. . .

Rural focus welcome in health review but urgent action needed:

The NZ Rural General Practice Network today welcomed the Health and Disability System Review’s focus on addressing inequity in access to health care for rural communities, but said action was now needed with real urgency.

The new Chief Executive for the NZRGPN, Grant Davidson, said he would take time to digest the report and discuss it with its members, but welcomed the acknowledgement of the pressing need to address rural health.

“The first report noted that access to healthcare for rural communities was ‘unacceptable’ and the extent to which rural communities and their inequitable access to healthcare is a focus in this report is welcomed,” Grant Davidson . . 

Farmers helps save Pacific economies as COvid-19 brings economies to a halt – Mereia Volavola:

The Pacific Islands have been spared some of the deadliest health consequences of the coronavirus pandemic.

But by taking away the tourists, the virus has dealt a huge blow to economies and jobs largely dependent on foreign visitors’ spending to stay afloat.

As of May, every destination on earth had put in place some form of travel restriction, according to the U.N.’s World Travel Organization, and all tourism in the Pacific has stopped as a consequence, depriving many communities of income. In Vanuatu, 70 percent of tourism jobs are estimated to have disappeared already.

In the midst of this crisis, small-scale farming has provided the region with crucial resilience . .

Allflex tech’s powering up Litchfields’ dairy op – Matt Sherrington:

The Litchfield family’s investment in technology from Allflex Livestock Intelligence is paying dividends within their southern NSW-based dairy farming operation.

Ian and Karen Litchfield purchased the 182-hectare Kariana, situated near Mayrung in the Riverina, in 2000, and over the years they’ve purchased three other blocks, which including Kariana cover 760ha of which 600ha consists of flat flood irrigation country.

Together with their daughter Amy and son-in-law Jack, the Litchfields milk 800 Holstein cows each year out of a total milking herd of 950 head with their flat milk supply sold into the year-round milk markets. . .


Rural round-up

21/11/2014

Canterbury’s Patoa Farms wins South Island Farmer of the Year for 2014:

Patoa Farms Ltd, a large scale free-farmed pig breeding and finishing operation at Hawarden in North Canterbury, has won the Lincoln University Foundation’s South Island Farmer of the Year competition for 2014.

The finals held yesterday evening at Lincoln University saw four very high calibre entrants vie for the top prize of a $20,000 travel grant for business study.

Foundation Chief Judge Nicky Hyslop said Steve and Josie Sterne, with daughter Holly Sterne, edged out stiff competition with their impressive growth, technical excellence, efficiency of production and strategic focus. They demonstrated that it was possible to achieve at the highest levels of farming technology and business management in an outdoor free-roaming stock operation. . .

Federated Farmers leader wants farmers to report rural crimes:

Federated Farmers Meat and Fibre Industry Group Chair Rick Powdrell says farmers aren’t diligent enough in reporting stock thefts from their properties.

“Unfortunately they might think the police aren’t interested or are too hard pressed to investigate,” he told the Meat and Fibre Council meeting in Wellington today.

“Federated Farmers surveyed members and our farmers have told us they don’t bother to report almost two-thirds of stock thefts.” . . .

CEO Successful Fellow:

NZ Landcare Trust CEO Dr. Nick Edgar has been awarded a Churchill Fellowship by the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust.

Dr Edgar’s Churchill Fellowship will involve examining local food system initiatives in Connecticut and Vermont, USA, that are creating economic and environmental improvement opportunities for farmers, producers and consumers.

In June 2013 Dr Edgar participated in a knowledge exchange workshop between land and water professionals from New Zealand and Vermont that was funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. The workshop was focused on managing agricultural non-point source pollution, in particular, comparing the different policy, research and farm-based approaches being implemented between New Zealand and Vermont. Vermont was chosen for a comparison with New Zealand due to similarities in that State’s reliance on both agriculture and tourism to support its economy. A situation closely mirrored in New Zealand. . .

Dairy Awards Secures Future in Industry:

Participating in the New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards has turned dreams into reality for the 2014 New Zealand Farm Manager of the Year, Nick Bertram.

“I am pretty happy as we know that we have got job security in the dairy industry. We are 100% going 50:50 sharemilking. Entering the dairy awards has made our dreams become reality,” Mr Bertram says.

Entries are now being accepted online at www.dairyindustryawards.co.nz in the 2015 awards programme, including the New Zealand Sharemilker/Equity Farmer of the Year, New Zealand Farm Manager of the Year and New Zealand Dairy Trainee of the Year competitions.

All entries close on November 30. . . .

Wealthy Waikato farmers stonewall ‘foreign’ ownership:

Waikato dairying and grazing blocks going on the market for sale are remaining under the ownership of ‘local’ farmers who are far better financially resourced than their counterparts from other New Zealand provinces, according to the latest batch of rural real estate sales data.

Leading agency Bayleys has sold 11 of the 15 diary and grazing farms in the region to have gone under the auctioneer’s hammer over the past two months – with Waikato farmers outbidding hopefuls from Taranaki, Hawke’s Bay, Northland, Southland, and the Bay of Plenty on every occasion.

Bayleys Waikato country manager Mark Dawe said that while ‘out of town’ bidders were active on many of the farms going up for auction, they simply couldn’t foot it financially with the ‘local boys’, in what has been the busiest quarterly sales period since 2007… even with another month of selling days left. . .

Prices surging, but volumes steady in October Rural Property Market:

Summary
Data released today by the Real Estate Institute of NZ (“REINZ”) shows there were three fewer farm sales (-0.9%) for the three months ended October 2014 than for the three months ended October 2013. Overall, there were 346 farm sales in the three months to end of October 2014, compared to 347 farm sales for the three months ended September 2014 (-0.3%) and 349 farm sales for the three months to the end of October 2013. 1,920 farms were sold in the year to October 2014, 17.9% more than were sold in the year to October 2013.

The median price per hectare for all farms sold in the three months to October 2014 was $27,898 compared to $24,590 recorded for three months ended October 2013 (+13.5%). The median price per hectare rose 7.3% compared to September. . .

 

 


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