Rural round-up

January 19, 2015

Water not just a pipe dream – Tim Fulton:

The latest Canterbury drought is reinforcing a message in farming: irrigation is valuable, stored supply is better and an alpine water source is best of all. TIM FULTON reports.

When the norwesters keep blowing rain on the Southern Alps and drying out the plains, even irrigators with the most advanced water networks can feel anxious.

Farmer shareholders on the $115 million Rangitata South irrigation scheme are facing tight storage conditions, even though they have access to periodic floodwater.

The network has been “just squeaking along with a rain here, a little fresh there” since it started supplying last spring, chairman Ian Morten says.

More water cannot be delivered from the main pond to farms on the scheme until the Rangitata River flows at 110 cubic metres. . .

Drought fears grow as dry spell continues:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy is expected to visit the parched South Canterbury area in the next few weeks as concern mounts that it and some other regions may be heading for a serious drought.

The Ministry for Primary Industries is monitoring the conditions in South Canterbury, as well as North Otago, Wairarapa and southern Hawke’s Bay.

MPI director of resource policy David Wansbrough said it had been talking with farmers and rural support trusts on a weekly basis.

However, he said farmers and communities appeared to be coping so far and the Government was not planning to step in with any support measures at this stage. . .

Drought!!!? – Gravedodger:

Drought is widely regarded in agricultural terms as a prolonged period of low rainfall when pastures and crops become seriously degraded by dehydration.

Yes last spring was one of low precipitation in many districts and having traveled the East coast from North Otago to The Bay of Plenty in the last 50 days there are now pockets with fodder insufficiency from “The Dry” but drought it aint.

Large Parts of Australia have been in that situation for several years and many rural properties are in a savage drought. With livestock having lost a serious degree of body weight, water supplies gone burger and absolutely zero opportunity to remove stock as buyers do not exist, increasing numbers of Aussie Farmers are taking their lives as despair overcomes their will to continue. . .

Big dry affects dairy production – Dene Mackenzie:

Dairy production is likely to slow below previous forecasts as parts of Canterbury and Otago dry off and water restrictions kick in, ASB rural economist Nathan Penny says.

”As we get further into the New Zealand summer, attention is turning to agricultural production. In the case of dairy, production has been good to date this season – albeit uneven across the regions.” . . .

Storage gives power to farmers – William C. Bailey:

United States corn and soybean farmers have a clear understanding that bad markets and low prices will reverse themselves to good times, just as good times will, eventually, fade into bad times.

The challenge, when these high or low points appear, is to prepare for the phase that will follow.

US corn and soybean farmers have enjoyed, over the past three to five seasons, really, really good prices. . .

 Sheep help drive tribe’s farm performance:

Ngati Porou has turned around its farming fortunes, reporting a surplus of $324,000 in its last financial year.

The figure compares to the previous period’s deficit of $1.46 million.

The Tairawhiti tribe said performance of its sheep division had improved, with sheep values and prices increasing.

Ngati Porou also said its lamb crop nearly doubled over two years, reaching 12,224 last year. . .

Rural gig good for peace-lovers – Steve Wyn-Harris:

Possibly every generation throughout history reckons things are getting worse and we are all going to hell in a hand basket.

That’s a little how I’m feeling at the moment.

However, there are great things happening here at the beginning of the 21st century which we should be grateful for.

For much of the world’s population improved healthcare and better food have led to the longest life expectancy humans have ever experienced. . .

 


Jo Hayes Nat candidate for Chch East

June 13, 2014

The National Party has selected List MP Joanne Hayes as its Christchurch East candidate for the 2014 General Election.

“Joanne has been a valuable member of our caucus as a List MP and will work hard for Christchurch East,” said Regional Chair Roger Bridge.

“National has made the rebuild one of its top priorities. Another Christchurch-based MP will help to keep our city’s voice strong in John Key’s National Party.”

Ms Hayes said she was proud to earn National’s nomination and is looking forward to the campaign.

“National is making real progress on the Christchurch rebuild, building a stronger economy with more jobs, and supporting hardworking families. Christchurch communities are seeing the benefits of a Government that is focussed on what matters and putting the needs of Christchurch at the top of the agenda,” said Ms Hayes.

“There are just three short months until the election on 20 September. I’ll be working hard to get out in the electorate and engage with the issues facing Christchurch East communities,” said Ms Hayes.

Joanne Hayes – Biographical Notes                                                                                      

Joanne Hayes is a National List Member of Parliament. She is of Ngati Porou, Ati Haunui A Paparangi, and Rangitane ki Wairarapa descent, and is married to Pat with two sons and two grandchildren.

Before entering Parliament at the beginning of this year, she held executive level positions in the health, social services, and education sectors, most recently as Director of Community Relations for UCOL Whanganui.

Ms Hayes previously stood for National in Dunedin South in 2011.

Jo has the distinction of being the candidate who won the party vote in Dunedin South which had been regarded as deep red.

Christchurch East is also a very red seat. Jo and her team will be working hard to change that and the electorate will benefit from having another government MP working in and for the city as it recovers from the earthquakes.


Wayne Walford Nat candidate for Napier

March 8, 2014

National’s Napier electorate has selected Hawkes Bay Chamber of Commerce Chief Executive Wayne Walford as its candidate to replace retiring MP Chris Tremain.

“Wayne has a great understanding of communities across Napier and Wairoa. He has the full support of myself and the National Party to run a strong campaign for the seat this year,” says retiring MP Chris Tremain.

Mr Walford says he is proud to have been selected and will be working hard to keep Napier’s strong voice in John Key’s National Party.

“The Government has delivered real results for the Hawkes Bay, and strong local representation in John Key’s National Party has been critical to getting some major local projects over the line,” says Mr Walford.

“These include the expressway redevelopment and Napier-Wairoa Road upgrade to name just a few.

“I’ll be working hard to win the confidence of the electorate to keep that strong voice and continue delivering jobs and growth for Napier, Wairoa, and the Bay.”

Wayne Walford – Biographical Notes

Of Ngati Porou descent, Wayne Walford was raised in the Hawke’s Bay and lives in Napier with wife Joan.

As Chief Executive Officer of the Hawkes Bay Chamber of Commerce, Wayne brings a track record of advocacy and leadership, and a focus on jobs and growth.

He holds a Masters in Business Administration and a Post Graduate Diploma in Business Studies from the University of Waikato, and a Diploma in Business Studies from Massey University.

 This is the second National selection this weekend and again the members have chosen a strong candidate.


Community Internship Programme applications open

August 24, 2012

The Community Internship Programe is calling for applications from not-for-profit groups in need of professional help.

The Community Internship Programme (CIP or the programme) funds hapū, iwi or community groups with identified development needs to employ skilled professionals from the public, iwi, private or community sectors as interns for three to six months.

The programme is designed to achieve specific capacity-building outcomes for host hapū, iwi or community organisations, and relationship-building outcomes between the public, private, iwi or community sectors.

The programme focuses on skill-sharing and the exchange of knowledge between sectors, while building ongoing relationships which continue after an internship ends.

Invercargill MP Eric Roy gives an example: a member of the NZ Police is currently helping Ngāti Porou to develop a youth mentoring programme to support youth at risk.

Not-for-Profit organisations are usually long on passion but can be short on skills.

This is a great idea to marry that passion with the skills they need and foster an on-going relationship with the Not-for-Profit sector.


%d bloggers like this: