Stop name change by stealth

27/04/2021

People often have different names – the legal one and one or more different one/s they are called.

The alternatives might be diminutives of their given name or nick names.

Countries too might be called by shortened versions of their names and some have changed theirs.

Time takes care of the confusion. Iran used to be Persia, Zimbabwe was once Rhodesia and I only remember Vanuatu used to be the New Hebrides because I had a pen friend there when I was a child.

Whether or not they change, countries usually have only one official name but New Zealand now seems to have three – New Zealand, Aotearoa New Zealand and Aotearoa.

Some countries have changed their names after wars or coups, but they can take place by the agreement of their citizens.  New Zealand’s name appears to be changing by stealth.

Some politicians and many in the media are using Aotearoa New Zealand, or Aotearoa.

I am not averse to changing our country’s name and if those three were the options I’d opt for Aotearoa, preferring a total change rather than the too-long and double-barrelled bob each-way alternative.

But I am opposed to change by stealth.

If we’re going to change the country’s name, let’s be open about it. Have a discussion, put it to a vote if necessary, but let’s not do it by stealth.


Argentina 25 – NZ 15

14/11/2020

Rugby history was made in Sydney tonight – Los Pumas beat the All Blacks for the first time.

We were in Japan last year when England beat New Zealand in the World Cup semi-final and it looked much the same – the ABs didn’t seem to have a plan for when the game didn’t go their way. When the pressure went on they just kept doing the same things that hadn’t worked before and they kept making errors.

This is the first time the ABs have lost two games in a row since 2011.

That isn’t good for them but it is good for Argentina and it is good for rugby.


Go all the way to Aotearoa

31/01/2019

Danny Tahau Jobe has launched a petition to  add Aotearoa to our country’s official name.

. . . “Official documents of national identity, birth and citizenship certificates, passports and money-notes have Aotearoa and New Zealand together as the names of the country,” Danny Tahau Jobe’s petition states.

“Only ‘New Zealand’ has official status. Both names together will officially confirm/enhance nationhood and uniqueness in the world.” . . 

I was listening to Peter Williams on Magic Talk yesterday when this topic came up for discussion and was pleasantly surprised that the majority of callers were in favour of a change.

But if we’re going to change the name of our country, let’s not muck around adding Aotearoa to New Zealand.

Let’s go all the way and change it to Aotearoa.

If we add a five or six syllables (depending on how it’s pronounced) to the three we’ve already got, most will shorten it, using one name or the other and those unfamiliar with te reo are much more likely to opt for New Zealand than Aotearoa.

I am in favour of a change but my preference is Aotearoa by itself.

The petition is here.


New Zealand by James K. Baxter

01/03/2018

 

Bill English brought his valedictory speech to an end with a reference to James K. Baxter’s poem New Zealand.

These unshaped islands, on the sawyer’s bench,
Wait for the chisel of the mind, . . . 

You can read the whole poem at the Poetry Foundation.


Rural round-up

18/10/2016

Calf milk powder shortage dire – Neal Walllace:

Calf rearers battling a shortage of milk powder are unlikely to get a reprieve this season with a major retailer warning product delays could continue for another four weeks.  

As if that wasn’t enough, farmers report the price of calf milk replacer, or what some are calling white gold, has increased in recent weeks from $53 for a 20kg bag to $75.  

Farmlands chief executive Peter Reidie said his company was not taking any new orders for calf milk replacer (CMR) because suppliers had advised they could not supply any product. . . 

World food trends favour dairy – Hugh Stringleman:

Fonterra has identified 11 modern consumer food trends it says are very positive for high quality milk production in New Zealand.  

Global consumer and food service chief operating officer Jacqueline Chow said Fonterra had invested $1 billion over the past decade in dairy innovation – in science, sustainability, nutrition and packaging – to position the co-operative to meet the trends.  

Its dairy farmers had also spent $1b over the past five years on environmental initiatives. . . 

More calls to rural support line reported -:

The Waikato Rural Support Trust is receiving unusually high numbers of calls from farmers as adverse weather conditions and the low dairy payout take a toll, it says.

Trust chairman Neil Bateup said a particularly wet spring had caused issues with feed quality and quantity and that had made farming very difficult.

Mr Bateup said the farmers calling were mainly in the dairy industry, with those people also struggling with the low payout of the past couple of years. . . 

Feral Activists Are Worse Than The Pests 1080 Fights:

Activism in New Zealand has sunk to a new low as conservation workers don’t even feel safe going about their daily jobs.

Federated Farmers is deeply concerned for the safety of the country’s conservation department staff and contractors, as so-called activists continue to ignore the fact that 1080 is working well for New Zealand.

“It is simply unacceptable for New Zealanders who go to work every day to protect our environment, to be made to feel unsafe doing their jobs,” says Federated Farmers president Dr William Rolleston.

“This is madness and it’s activism out of control. . . 

Ngāi Tahu adds horse treks to its tourism stable – Aaron Smale:

Ngāi Tahu has bought a horse trekking business in Glenorchy to add to its tourism portfolio.

The South Island iwi has bought Dart Stables in Glenorchy, which runs horse treks through a region that features heavily in Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings film trilogy.

Ngāi Tahu Tourism chief executive Quinton Hall said the business fit well with its broader tourism strategy.

“The team at Dart Stables has an excellent reputation with customers and within the local community and has access to some of the most beautiful parts of the country,” he said. . . 

Enterprising Rural Women Awards (ERWA) entrants for 2016:

Six fantastic businesses are competing in three categories this year and the ultimate winner will receive the supreme prize for the Enterprising Rural Women Awards.

Rural Women New Zealand’s annual awards showcase rural women who run their own successful businesses. For the entrants, it is an opportunity to promote their innovative rural enterprise and gain recognition for their contribution to their community.

Each category winner receives $1,000 in prize money and a trophy, with a further $1,000 being awarded to the supreme winner who is judged as an exceptional rural business women. Prizes also include clothing from Swazi Apparel and from the Agri-Women’s Development Trust $400 worth of executive coaching for each category winner and an additional $3,400 professional development package for the supreme winner.

2016 ERWA categories: . . 

International Beef Alliance meets in Taupo:

New Zealand is hosting beef producers from the International Beef Alliance in Taupo this week.

The International Beef Alliance includes the national organisations representing beef cattle producers in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Mexico, New Zealand, Paraguay and the United States and it meets annually to progress issues of common interest.

This week the Presidents and CEOs from the Cattle Council of Australia, Associação dos Criadores de Mato Grosso, Associação Nacional dos Confinadores de Brasil, Canadian Cattlemen’s Association, Confederación Nacional de Organizaciones Ganaderas, Asociación Rural de Paraguay, Beef + Lamb New Zealand and the US National Cattlemen’s Beef Association will meet in Taupo. This group accounts for 46% of the world’s beef cattle production and 63% of global beef exports. . . 

Helping farmers save time and take control:

With volatility in the dairy payout, there has never been a more important time to have a clear picture of your farming business’ performance.

And according to Figured’s marketing manager Monica Shepherd, nearly 40 per cent of farmers surveyed at the New Zealand National Fieldays, said they wanted more advice from their accountants on how to achieve just that.

In response, Dairy Women’s Network is running a free dairy module called ‘Farming in the Cloud’ with its partners Figured, Xero, ASB Bank and Crowe Horwath. . . 

New Zealand’s Extra Virgin Olive Oil Awards – Top Honours Announced:

Winners in New Zealand’s most prestigious competition for olive oil were announced last night at a formal dinner held at Parliament in Wellington and hosted by MP Paul Foster-Bell.

Robinsons Bay Olives from Akaroa took out the 2016 Best in Show as well as Best in Class in the Commercial Medium Blends Class at the New Zealand Extra Virgin Olive Awards, run by Olives New Zealand, the national organisation for olive oil growers.

The Old N’Olive Grove Partnership from Wairarapa won the Best in Boutique Category for growers who produce less than 250 litres of certified extra virgin olive oil, as well as Best in Class in the Boutique Intense Single Varietal Class with their Rockbottom Grove Picual. . . 

Image may contain: grass, outdoor, text and nature

Thank ewe for supporting wool week.


NZ’s in the final

24/03/2015

What a game!

South Africa
281/5 (43) Live
New Zealand
288/6 (42.2)

NZ-Korea FTA completed

16/11/2014

New Zealand and Korea have completed a Free Trade Agreement which will save our exporters $65m in the first year.

Prime Minister John Key today announced that New Zealand and the Republic of Korea have completed Free Trade Agreement negotiations.

“Korea is New Zealand’s sixth largest export destination for goods and services and eighth largest import source of goods and services, with total two-way trade of $4 billion in the year ending June 2014,” says Mr Key.

“The FTA will put New Zealand exporters back on a level playing field with competitors from Korea’s other FTA partners, such as the United States, Chile and the European Union.

“At the moment our exporters to Korea pay $229 million a year in duties. Under the FTA, New Zealand exporters will save an estimated $65 million in duties in the first year alone. . .

This is very good news for producers, manufacturers and consumers in both countries.

One of the messages from Rabobank’s F20, which we attended last week, was that protection threatens food security and hurts the poor most.

Free trade is fair trade.

 

 

 

 


69 facts about NZ

17/04/2014

Buzzfeed looks at New Zealand and finds 69 facts some of which are:

1. The kea, a bird native to NZ, is known for pulling windscreen wipers off cars and eating the strips of rubber from windows.
2. The longest place name in the world is Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateapokaiwhenuakitanatahu, a hill in Hawkes Bay.
3. No part of the country is more than 128km (79 miles) from the sea.
4. In the scene of Star Trek: First Contact, where we see Earth from space, Australia and Papua New Guinea are clearly visible but New Zealand is missing.
5. Wellington is the southernmost capital city in the world.
6. Only 5% of NZ’s population is human- the rest are animals.
7. NZ is the least corrupt nation in the world (tied with Denmark), according to the Corruptions Perception Index.
8. New Zealand has more Scottish pipe bands per capita than any other country in the world.
9. Blue Lake, in Nelson Lakes National Park, has the clearest water in the world.
10. New Zealand is home to the world’s smallest dolphin species.
11. There are no land snakes, native or introduced, in NZ.
12. New Zealand has three official languages: English, Māori and New Zealand Sign Language.
13. In 2008, TripAdvisor named Milford Sound (pictured below) the world’s top travel destination, based on an international survey. . . .

17. More people die in New Zealand each year playing lawn bowls than scuba diving.
18. NZ is home to more species of penguins than any other country.
19. In 1893, New Zealand became the first country to give women the right to vote.
20. Auckland is one of the most affordable cities in the world to live in.
21. One in three Auckland households own a boat. . . .

32. There are only two countries in the world where drug companies are permitted to advertise to the public: New Zealand and USA.
33. Kiwi Nancy Wake was the Gestapo’s most wanted person during World War II. She once killed a SS sentry with her bare hands.
34. More people live in Auckland than in the whole of the South Island.
35. The logo for the Royal New Zealand Air Force is a kiwi– a flightless bird.
36. In the Lord of the Rings films, the beer drunk on camera was a custom NZ brew called ‘Sobering Thought’.
37. The filming of these movies pumped around $200 million into the country’s economy. The New Zealand government even created a Minister for Lord of the Rings, to ensure the most money could be made from the films.
38. In 1996, a man broke into a radio station in Wanganui and took the manager hostage, demanding that they play the Muppet song “Rainbow Connection”.
39. Two NZ rescue dogs were taught to drive a car around a track, in order to prove the intelligence of shelter animals. . . .

43. NZ high schools and universities are permitted to keep a pound of uranium or thorium for educational purposes. However, there is a $1 million fine if it explodes.
44. There is a giant carnivorous snail living in the South Island.
45. From 1867 to 1927, the government planed ahead for shipwrecks by building supply-filled huts on remote islands.
46. There is a clock in Dunedin which has been running since 1864, despite never having been wound since it was made.
47. Gisborne airport has train tracks running across the middle of the runway. Quite often, trains and planes have to stop until one moves out of the way.
48. NZ had a 58% casualty rate in World War I. . .

58. In 2008, Henry the tuatara became a father for the first time at the age of 111. (A tuatara is a reptile native to New Zealand.)
59. New Zealand is the only country with the right to put Hobbit-related images on its currency. . . .

60. New Zealand was the last habitable land mass to be populated.
61. Three quarters of New Zealanders living overseas are in Australia.  . . .

65. New Zealand produces 100 kg of butter and 65 kg of cheese each year per person. . .

67. NZ has banned all television advertising on Good Friday, Easter Sunday, ANZAC Day, and Christmas Day. . .

69. There are more vending machines in Japan than there are people in New Zealand.


No jobs are bad jobs

21/04/2012

The trans-Tasman tide appears to be turning as businesses choose to move from Australia to New Zealand.

That should be cause for celebration, but not for opposition MPs:

. . .  the Labour Party turned up its nose at every kind of new job available, from cigarette-roller to croupier to call centre operator, egged on by most other political parties. 

So we’re back to wanting the nanny state, now, are we?  What a luxury to feel the country is able to pass up gainful employment in legal industries. . .

These are the same MPs who have complained about losing New Zealand jobs to Asia but they can’t have it both ways:

There are complaints that firms are moving over here because we have lower wages than in Australia, and that is causing anger and concern for people that enjoy complaining.

However, these same people are also complaining that the strong NZ dollar against a number of countries (primarily China and the US) is leading us to loss jobs by making labour less competitive – in other words, by making New Zealand labour relatively more expensive, in other words by pushing up peoples real wages.

I wonder what the people doing the jobs think of the MPs’ criticism of their gainful employement?

No jobs are bad jobs and working for a low wage doesn’t have to be a life sentence. Some people might not have the ability and/or will to earn more but low-skilled work still has to be done and many who start in low-paid positions can work their way up to better ones.

Finance Minister Bill English rightly says that the increasing number of Australian companies investing and creating  jobs in New Zealand is good for the economy and will help increase  incomes:

“For the first time  in quite a few years, Australian businesses are seeing competitive  opportunities in New Zealand,” he says. “This reflects a number of  issues, ranging from the exchange rate, lower business costs, an  improving regulatory environment and the positive direction of economic  policy.

“That was conveyed to the New Zealand team of ministers  and officials at the Australian New Zealand Leadership Forum in Sydney  last week, where business leaders said they were encouraged by New  Zealand’s economic policy direction.”

Over the past three years,  the Government has implemented a wide-ranging economic programme to make New Zealand more competitive.

This includes:

  • The  Budget 2010 tax package which increased taxes on consumption and  property speculation, and reduced taxes on work, companies and saving.
  • Improvements to regulation – for example resource management laws, building laws and industrial relations laws.
  • The Government’s multi-billion dollar infrastructure programme, in rail,  roads, electricity transmission and ultra-fast broadband, to make the  economy more productive.
  • A focus on changing the incentives around welfare and work.
  • Reducing government-imposed costs on business – for example, ACC levies on  employers and the self-employed will fall by 22 per cent this year,  reducing total costs to business each year by about $250 million.

“This is a long-term programme that will continue over the next few years to  improve New Zealand’s competitiveness,” Mr English says.

“We need  to encourage companies to invest, and create jobs, including from  countries like Australia. This investment needs to come from businesses  because the Government simply cannot afford to borrow and spend at the  rate of the past decade.

“When capital is invested and management  skills improve, New Zealand companies can sell their products for higher prices in overseas markets. It’s a recipe for higher wages, more  exports and a faster-growing Kiwi economy.

We’d all be better off if our economy supported higher wages, and we’re more likely to get there by having people employed in any jobs, even if they’re low paid, than by having them unemployed.

The more people in work the better it is for them and the economy and a healthier economy supports higher wages.


NZ 24 – Fiji 7

04/02/2012

A friend who is a Wellington Sevens regular reckons that when you get bored you can watch the rugby.

Bored or not, if the sound of the crowd was anything to go by they were watching the final and delighted with the result: New Zealand 24 –  Fiji 7.

 


NZ wins World Cup

09/09/2011

We’ve won!

Well not the World Cup but a World Cup – New Zealand has won the Parliamentary World Cup.

The New Zealand team made up of MPs, political advisers and guest players including an ex-All Black made a strong start and won “about 40-nil” in the final played in Auckland according to captain and National MP for Napier Chris Tremain.

They were playing Argentina and while I’m delighted New Zealand won that game, I’ll be backing the blue and white team in the first RWC game at Dunedin’s new stadium tomorrow. (But, shhh,  don’t tell my English sister-in-law).

¡Vamos Argentina!


If we call it home it is

08/10/2010

After the contretemps started by Paul Henry this week we should all be quite clear that our Governor General, Sir Anand Satyanand, is a New Zealander.

He was born here, after all, but is being born here the only thing which makes us New Zealanders?

I don’t think so.

Children who are adopted have all the rights of children born into their family and that seems to be a good rule for citizens too.

We’re all descended from immigrants or immigrants ourselves.

It doesn’t matter if our forebears paddled here in waka, came here under sail, by steam or air, of if we were born somewhere else and chose to settle here.

If this is our land by birth or by choice, we’re New Zealanders.

As Philip Temple put it in his memoir, Chance Is A Fine Thing:

. . . the ceremony was telling me in a tangible way that I belonged. Perhaps it had been absurd to doubt it, after almost 50 years. But I had needed to come to terms with the inheritances and loyalties of my own whakapapa and what I felt had been challenges to my right to be here by those who claimed greater precedence. Now it had become clear that, while I was proud to be rooted in the values and traditions of British and Western European culture, I was defined by New Zealand . . .

Defined by New Zealand, that’s what makes us Kiwis.

Regardless of  where we came from or how long ago, if we call New Zealand home it is; and if we do that we’re New Zealanders.


Tuesday’s answers

09/06/2009

Monday’s questions were:

1. From where was the telegram alerting the world to the death of Robert Falcon Scott and his party in Antarctica sent?

2. Who wrote The Dot?

3. Who said: The cow is of the bovine ilk;/One end is moo, the other milk?

4. Which city would I be in if I was standing on the north bank of the Firth of Tay?

5. These are the flags of which countries:

flags

Congratulations, and an electronic bunch of flowers to Ray who got 5/5.

Kismet gets a couple of points for getting two answers right and Inventory 2 gets one for trying,

Tuesday’s answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


NZ tops Global Peace Index

03/06/2009

 New Zealand has topped the  Institute for Economics and Peace’s Global Peace Index .

dairy 1

The Institute is an Australian think tank dedicated to developing the inter-relationships between business, peace and economic development.
The results of the 2009 survey  suggest:
that the world has become slightly less peaceful in the past year, which appears to reflect the intensification of violent conflict in some countries and the effects of both the rapidly rising food and fuel prices early in 2008 and the dramatic global economic downturn in the final quarter of the year. Rapidly rising unemployment, pay freezes and falls in the value of house prices, savings and pensions is causing popular resentment in many countries, with political repercussions that have been registered by the GPI through various indicators measuring safety and security in society.
 
The GPI uses 23 indicators  of the existence or absence of peace, divided into three broad categories:  measures of ongoing domestic and international conflict, measures of safety and security in society and measures of militarization.
The Top 10 countries were: New Zealand, Denmark, Norway, Iceland, Austria, Sweden, Japan, Canada, Finland and Slovenia.
At the bottom were: Georgia, Zimbabwe, Russia, Pakistan, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan, Israel, Somalia, Afghaanistan and Iraq.
The full list is here.

NZ males endangered species

24/10/2008

Jim Hopkins ruminates on the news New Zealand men’s sperm count is in decline:

Mainly because they’re as daft as the blokes who produce them. You see, what happens is that sperm get so overexcited at the prospect of hurtling to oblivion that millions of them actually beat themselves to death with their own tails.

It’s true! They wiggle so hard they kill themselves. Which doesn’t really advance the argument for intelligent design but is a nigh perfect metaphor for most male behaviour.

“Oh, wow! This must be fun. It really hurts!!!!”

The rest of his column is here.


NZ food less trusted

29/09/2008

Chinese people are less likely to trust New Zealand food in the wake of the melamine milk poisoning scandal. 

Just over half (51.2 percent) of respondents said they were now less likely to trust New Zealand brands of dairy or other food products than they did before. However, New Zealand still came second when consumers were asked to rate which country’s food products were the most trustworthy – behind the European Union but ahead of the United States, Canada, Australia, Japan and China in that order.

That New Zealand food is still regarded as trustworthy is some consolation but:

Sinogie Consulting chief executive Bruce McLaughlin, who is based in Shanghai, said he was surprised New Zealand’s reputation as a food producer had not suffered more.

“People are well aware that it was Fonterra who was involved with Sanlu,” he said.

It was luck not judgement that Sanlu in which Fonterra has a stake wasn’t the only company which used poisoned milk and there are 21 other brands with similar problems. 

Given that, if I was Chinese I’d find it very difficult to trust any food at all and I’m taking a great deal more interest in the fine print on labels when I’m in the supermarket to ensure I’m not inadvertently buying food from China.

Update: Roarprawn notes that the company carrying out the survey is working for our competitors.


More problems with milk

29/09/2008

The Phillipines government has ordered that three Anchor brand flavoured milk products be removed for testing.

The Philippines’ Bureau of Food and Drugs had initially ordered seven Fonterra products be tested for melamine, the chemical found in Chinese milk products including infant formula, which has caused kidney complications and at least four infant deaths.

But during the weekend Philippine officials limited this to three Anchor Wam flavoured-milk products – Mango Magic, Orange Chill and Strawberry Spin – which the bureau said were not produced in New Zealand.

Officials had initially also included Fonterra’s Anchor Lite milk, Anlene low-fat milk, Anmum Materna and Anmum Materna Chocolate, but removed them from the list because the products were manufactured in New Zealand.

A Fonterra spokesman said yesterday that the products involved were made with milk from New Zealand, which had been repackaged in China.

Why would you go expose yourself to the expense and risk of repackaging in China something produced and processed in New Zealand?


Free Trade deal with US closer

23/09/2008

Great news – the United States is going to join New Zealand, Singapore, China and Brunei in multi lateral free trade negotiations as part of the Comprehensive Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership Agreement.

The agreement, commonly known as the “P4”, was signed between Singapore, Chile and New Zealand in 2005. Brunei joined it a year later.

It aims to tear down trade barriers among participants within a decade.

World wide free trade is best, but until we get there, free trade deals with inidividual countries or groups is a lot better than trade restrictions and Phil Goff deserves our gratitude for achieving this progress with the USA.

If this free trade deal goes ahead it will be especially good news for sheep and beef exporters who currently disadvantaged by taxes put in place to protect U.S. meat producers in their local markets.


Leader demands resignation

11/09/2008

A politician has been forced to resign  because he misled his leader – but it was in Australia not New Zealand

An Australian state premier says his police minister has quit his Cabinet post over revelations that he danced in his underwear at a parliamentary office party.

New South Wales Premier Nathan Rees told Fairfax Radio Network on Thursday that he demanded Matt Brown’s resignation Wednesday night because Brown had misled him about what had happened at the office party three months ago.
     
Rees says Brown initially claimed that nothing inappropriate had happened at the party but later admitted to stripping to his underwear.

It’s good to know there’s somewhere in the world where the truth is still valued, ethical standards are upheld and elected representatives are held to account for lying.


Come home campaign canned

08/09/2008

What a surprise – the come home Kiwis campaign didn’t work.

A marketing campaign aimed at luring expat New Zealanders home from Australia has been canned and declared a failure.

An evaluation of the campaign, obtained under The Official Information Act by The Dominion Post, found it received more media coverage in New Zealand than Australia.

The campaign was launched in May 2006 at a cost $1 million a year.

A similar campaign was more successful in Britain where it was launched in November 2005.

The evaluation found New Zealanders were more integrated in Australia than in Britain and the lifestyle was not sufficiently different to be a selling point.

It was cancelled because it had “not proven to be effective”.

Neither campaign made any difference in the number of people leaving New Zealand.

It’s not people choosing to leave the country for their OE nor choosing not to return that is the real problem.

It is the people who feel they have to go and can’t come back because they have a better life in other countries that is the real problem.

The solution to that is not spin, it’s economic growth and the social improvements which come with it.


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