Culinary taonga threatened species

October 13, 2018

Sandwich sliced bread  and therefore  the culinary taonga – cheese and asparagus rolls and club sandwiches made with it – are in peril:

Sandwich bread sales in Dunedin could soon be toast.

A spokeswoman for Foodstuffs, which controls New World, Pak’n Save and Four Square, said its shoppers preferred toast bread to sandwich bread.

Demand for sandwich bread had continued to fall in recent years.

People like a thicker, more generous slice, but we think that another factor is that there are so many other options for sandwiches available today. From ciabatta and seed-studded loaves to flavoured wraps, pita breads and crackers.” . .

Crumbs! Bread makers and retailers must be crackers if they think sandwich sliced bread is toast.

Some people might like a thicker more generous slice but I swapped from Vogel’s to Burgen bread when the former dropped sandwich slices which the latter still produces.

As for fancy breads, wraps and crackers, they have their place, but that is not encasing the cheese roll filling or asparagus, with or without the addition of Whitestone Windsor Blue cheese; or for making club sandwiches.

Cheese rolls are generally only found on the right side of the Waitaki River, asparagus rolls and club sandwiches feature at lunches and teas and suppers further afield.

Wherever they’re found, and feature, they will be lost if thin sliced sandwich bread can no longer be sourced and part of our culinary heritage will go too.

That would be really crumby

 


Rural round-up

July 18, 2018

Super grass offers huge benefits – and it’s green! Pity about the GM … – Point of Order:

Environmentalists should be encouraging NZ’s development of ryegrass with the potential to substantially increase farm production, reduce water demand and decrease methane emissions.

We are told the grass has been shown in AgResearch’s Palmerston North laboratories to grow up to 50 per cent faster than conventional ryegrass, to be able to store more energy for better animal growth, to be more resistant to drought, and to produce up to 23 per cent less methane (the largest single contributor to New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions) from livestock. . .

Dig deep for sheep – Annette Scott:

Confidence in sheep is at an all-time high with demand at the Temuka in-lamb ewe fair providing the real proof of industry positivity.

With record processing prices for mutton the sale was always going to be the real test for the market, PGG Wrightson livestock manager Joe Higgins said.

With just 6000 ewes offered and close to 100 registered buyers it was a sellers’ market with clearly not enough sheep to go around. . .

Wool Summit leads to greater direction:

Key players in New Zealand’s wool industry are to form a new coordinating group to better tell wool’s story, says Federated Farmers.

At this week’s Wool Summit in Wellington there was a real sense of urgency to get cooperation and momentum, says Miles Anderson, Federated Farmers Meat & Wool Industry Group Chairperson.

New Zealand wool producers have been under pressure, particularly in the last two years as prices for strong wool hit record lows. . .

Eradicating cattle disease M. bovis may be costly, even impossible, but we must try – Richard Laven:

In May this year, the New Zealand government decided that it would attempt to eradicate Mycoplasma bovis, a bacterial disease that affects cattle.

A phased eradication means that an additional 126,000 livestock will need to be culled, at an estimated cost of NZ$886 million.

Here’s what we know, what we don’t know and what’s at stake. . .

Works not an out for sick stock – TIm Fulton:

Stock transport is high on the animal welfare agenda as new regulations come into force.

Inspectors will be especially alert to badly lame stock being carted to meatworks, Ministry for Primary Industries compliance team manager Peter Hyde told a Beef + Lamb New Zealand meeting in North Canterbury. 

“Using the meat companies to sort out your lameness issues is not acceptable,” he said. . .

 

Kiwifruit expected to remain king of horticulture export industry – Julie Iles:

Kiwifruit exports, valued at $1.86 billion, remains New Zealand’s most valuable horticulture export. 

It’s closely followed by the value of wine exports, at $1.72b, though they were less than half the value of the kiwifruit exports in 2004. 

The latest forecasts by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) predict the kiwifruit export industry will grow in value at a slightly faster pace than the wine industry over the next four years.  . .

Farmlands joins Apple and Emerites in KPMG Award

Farmlands Cooperative has been named the New Zealand winner of KPMG’s prestigious Global Customer Experience Excellence (CEE) Award.

New Zealand’s largest rural supplies and services cooperative was presented with the award at a ceremony hosted by KPMG in Auckland this morning.

Farmlands joins 13 other winners of the award world-wide, including Singapore Airlines (Australia), Apple Store (Italy), Alipay (China) and Emirates (UAE). Following Farmlands in the top five for New Zealand were Air New Zealand, Kiwibank, New World and ASB Bank. . .

America’s cheese stockpile just hit an all-time high – Caitlin Dewey:

The United States has amassed its largest stockpile of cheese in the 100 years since regulators began keeping tabs, the result of booming domestic production of milk and consumers’ waning interest in the dairy beverage.

The 1.39 billion-pound stockpile, tallied by the Agriculture Department last week, represents a 6 percent increase over this time last year and a 16 percent increase since an earlier surplus prompted a federal cheese buy-up in 2016. . .

 


Why are Foodstuffs blocking Macleans?

July 3, 2017

The last item on my shopping list was toothpaste.

I wandered down the aisle where it ought to be and saw several different brands and sizes but not the one I wanted.

I walked back up, looking more carefully and still couldn’t see the brand I’ve been buying for years.

I found several others, some I recognised and some I didn’t, but no Macleans .

A staff member was stocking shelves near by. I asked her if she could help me.

She said, sorry, the supermarket no longer stocked that brand. Foodstuffs had decided to replace Macleans with Oral B.

Bother, I thought. I could try the other brand but what if I don’t like the taste?

I had a vague memory someone once told me it tasted like liniment. Did I trust that vague memory or take a chance?

I might be pleasantly surprised by a new flavour. But then again I might not and I didn’t want several weeks feeling like I was cleaning my teeth with something better suited to a rugby changing room than the inside of my mouth.

The tube at home still has two or three weeks of teeth cleaning left in it. There is a Countdown in town and while it’s not as convenient to get to as the Four Square or New World supermarkets, I could make a detour for toothpaste before I ran out.

So I didn’t buy any toothpaste and next time I’m near another supermarket I’ll pop in to make the purchase.

I like the New World and Four Square stores I frequent. The staff are friendly and helpful, the stores are on my direct route in and out of town, and they usually have what I want.

So, Foodstuffs,  you’re not going to lose a customer because of this change but you will lose some custom because if I’m in the other supermarket for toothpaste, odds are I’ll buy something else as well.

You’re also going to worry me – if you drop one of my usual purchases from your range, what’s to stop you dropping more for what appears to be your convenience rather than your customers’ choice?

Your stores are usually pretty good at customer service and in my experience your staff generally act on the principle that the customer is always right.

Why then have you changed to the wrong toothpaste?

Stock the other one as well if you want to, but please bring back the right one for me too.


Vote for best cheese

February 13, 2012

New World is inviting people to vote for the People’s Choice in the Cuisine Cheese Awards.

You can only vote for one cheese, vote only once and when you’ve voted you can’t see anything in the other categories.

They’re listed in alphabetical order so you have to go right to the end to get to the best: Whitestone.

I started with the blues and voted for New Zealand’s best – Whitestone Windsor Blue, which is the last listed in that category.

Having done that I wasn’t able to see the options for other categories but Whitestone is sure to be well represented there and if I was choosing a soft cheese I’d have gone for Whitestone Waitaki Camembert.

If you vote you’re in the draw to win tickets to the Monteith’s CheeseFest on Wednesday, 29 February at The Langham in Auckland, two nights accommodation there, dinner and a The Langham, dinner, a  Tiffin Afternoon Tea and a $500 VISA Prezzy Card.


Time for the south to get bolshie

October 6, 2009

North Islanders’  opposition to paying for plastic bags at supermarkets led to the charge being dropped but we’re still paying 5 cents a bag in the south.

It’s amounted to $50,000 in two months. The money has gone to conservation projects and there’s been a 60% drop in plastic bag consumption.

Kent Mahon, of New World, says he believe North Islanders will accept the changes eventually.

“Once they (North Islanders) fully understand that the profits are going back into community work, such as the DOC projects, then it’s a change they’re happy to make,” he says.

Or maybe South Islanders will get bolshie and the charge will be dropped down here too.

I don’t have a problem with donations to good causes or a drop in consumption of something we might not have needed but I still object to the charge.

I prefer to make my own choices about which charities I support with my money.

And I am not at all impressed by being asked to pay for a plastic bag which I’ll reuse at least once, and often several times, when supermarkets carry on unnecessarily encasing fresh fruit and vegetables in plastic wrap and foam trays which gets chucked out as soon as I get home.


%d bloggers like this: