Picked the wrong region

August 18, 2012

You could be forgiven if you’ve forgotten that Labour leader David Shearer launched his regional tour in Nelson last week because it was overshadowed by the party’s internal bickering.

Mind you it might not have got any more attention had their not been side shows.

Be that as it may, he went and he spoke about how the regions are going backwards.

If he’d done his homework he might have known, as Finance Minister Bill English does,  that Nelson isn’t going backwards, it’s growing:

 The ASB / Main Report Regional Economic Scoreboard for the March quarter ranks New Zealand according to 16 regional council areas. Among other things, it shows that the Tasman region has continued to edge up the scoreboard and now takes out the top spot. Businesses in the Tasman region are more likely to believe their assessment than the assessment of the Leader of the Opposition, who went there and told a very small audience that the Tasman economy was in poor shape.

Whoops.

If someone in Labour had done a little homework Shearer wouldn’t have launched his regions-going-backwards campaign in the region which is going forwards.


February 1 in history

February 1, 2010

On February 1:

1327 Teenaged Edward III was crowned King of England, but the country was ruled by his mother Queen Isabella and her lover Roger Mortimer.

1662 Chinese general Koxinga seized the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege.

1663 Mother Ignacia del Espiritu Santo, Filipino foundress of the Religious of the Virgin Mary, was born.

1790 The Supreme Court of the United States attempted to convene for the first time.

1793 French Revolutionary Wars: France declared war on the United Kingdom and the Netherlands.

Varoux.jpg

1814 Mayon Volcano, in the Philippines, erupted, killing around 1,200 people.

1842 The Fifeshire arrived in Nelson with the first immigrants for the New Zealand Company’s latest venture, which followed the settlement of Wellington, New Plymouth and Wanganui.

First NZ Company settlers arrive in Nelson

1861 Texas seceded from the United States.

1862 Julia Ward Howe‘s “Battle Hymn of the Republic” was published for the first time in the Atlantic Monthly.

 

1865 President Abraham Lincoln signed the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

1973 John Barry, Irish recipient of the Victoria Cross, was born.

VCJohnBarry.jpg

1884 Edition one of the Oxford English Dictionary was published.

1893 Thomas A. Edison finishes construction of the first motion picture studio, the Black Maria in West Orange, New Jersey.

1896 The opera La bohème premieresd in Turin.

 Mimì’s costume for act 1 of La bohème designed by Adolf Hohenstein for the world premiere

1897 Shinhan Bank, the oldest bank in South Korea, opened in Seoul.

Logo of Shinhan Bank

1901 Clark Gable, American actor, was born.

1908 King Carlos I of Portugal and his son, Prince Luis Filipe are killed in Terreiro do Paco, Lisbon.

 

1918 Muriel Spark, Scottish author, was born.

Jeanbrodie.JPG

1920 The Royal Canadian Mounted Police began operations.

1931 Boris Yeltsin, 1st President of the Russian Federation, was born.

1934 Bob Shane, American folk singer (The Kingston Trio), was born.

1937 Don Everly, American musician (Everly Brothers), was born.

1937 Ray Sawyer, American singer (Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show), was born.

1942 Vidkun Quisling was appointed Premier of Norway by the Nazi occupiers.

1943 The German 6th Army surrendered at Stalingrad.

1946 Trygve Lie of Norway was picked to be the first United Nations Secretary General.

1957 Felix Wankel‘s first working prototype DKM 54 of the Wankel engine was running at the NSU research and development department Versuchsabteilung TX in Germany.

 

1958 Egypt and Syria merge to form the United Arab Republic, which lasted until 1961.

1958 The United States Army launched Explorer 1.

1960 Four black students stage the first of the Greensboro sit-ins.

1965 The Hamilton River in Labrador, Canada was renamed the Churchill River in honour of Winston Churchill.

Churchillfallslabrador2.jpg

1968 – Canada’s three military services, the Royal Canadian Navy, the Canadian Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force, were unified into the Canadian Forces.

Canadian Forces emblem.png

1972  Kuala Lumpur becomes a city by a royal charter granted by the Yang di-Pertuan Agong of Malaysia.


Flag

1974 A fire in the 25-story Joelma Building in Sao Paulo killed 189 and injures 293.

1979 – The Ayatollah Khomeini was welcomed back into Tehran after nearly 15 years of exile.

 

1981 Trans-Tasman sporting relations reached breaking point at the Melbourne Cricket Ground when Australian captain Greg Chappell ordered his brother Trevor to bowl underarm (along the ground) for the final delivery of a limited-overs cricket international against New Zealand.

Trevor Chappell bowls underarm

1989 The Western Australian towns of Kalgoorlie and Boulder amalgamate to form the City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder.

Kal Post mod.jpg

1992 The Chief Judicial Magistrate of Bhopal court declares Warren Anderson, ex-CEO of Union Carbide, a fugitive under Indian law for failing to appear in the Bhopal Disaster case.

1996 The Communications Decency Act was passed by the U.S. Congress.

1998 Rear Admiral Lillian E. Fishburne became the first female African American to be promoted to rear admiral.

Fishburne.jpg

  • 2003Space Shuttle Columbia disintegrates during reentry into the Earth’s atmosphere, killing all seven astronauts aboard.
  • 2004 251 people were trampled to death and 244 injured in a stampede at the Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia.
    2005 King Gyanendra exercised a coup d’état to capture Neapl, becoming Chairman of the Councils of ministers.

    2005 – Canada introduced the Civil Marriage Act, making Canada the fourth country to sanction same-sex marriage

    2009 Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir was elected as the first female Prime Minister of Iceland, becoming the first openly gay head of state in the modern world.

    Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


    Better to reuse than recycle

    March 29, 2009

    Nelson’s cafes and takeaway outlets are taking BYO to a new level by asking customers to bring their own mugs.

    They are part of the city’s new Bring Your Own Container (BYOC) scheme aimed at reducing the mountain of waste dumped into the landfill each year.

    The mugs will need to be washe, but the tiny amount of hot water and detergent needed for that ought to have a fraction of the impact on the environment that recycling does and will reduce the amount of single-use plastic and paper cups that get binned.

    This is a very sensible green initiative – notwithstanding the opportunity for the health police to warn us of the dangers which lurk in mugs subjected to improper washing.


    It’s the economy, stupid

    October 9, 2008

    The Nelson Mail :

    Over the next month the major parties must temper the usual promises to perform better than the other lot with explanations of what they intend to do so that New Zealand can best weather this economic storm and the extended period of recovery to come. The time for election bribes is over. The choice is not so much between old hands and new brooms as in electing a government that will pull parties together to soberly guide the country through hard times.

    The Press:

    Clark has said this election will be one of trust. If this is so, then the question for voters will be who do you trust in the turbulent world we now face? With these tax cuts, and with some detail of its longer-term economic plans, National has placed its cards on the table. It has produced figures to show that its plans are fiscally responsible. Voters must decide whether Key and his colleagues can be trusted to deliver on them, or whether Labour can be trusted to manage difficult times as well as good ones.

    The Timaru Herald: 

    AS the economic news darkens by the day, voters’ thinking towards the election should also be changing. This should not be an election with any emphasis on such relatively trivial issues as the anti-smacking legislation, electoral spending, Winston Peters, the fate of the Maori seats, or how Helen Clark and John Key look. The vital issue is who should lead New Zealand through the economic storms ahead.

    . . . But has Labour’s economic management been that flash? It is easy to sail in the fair weather that the New Zealand economy has enjoyed over the last nine years. Dr Cullen has not been exposed to a financial storm. And voters told that their tax cuts pose a risk to the economy will wonder why they didn’t benefit through the good times.

    . . .There is little left in the budget pot over the next three years for grandiose plans, and parties that make such promises should be treated with disdain. Now is not the time to throw open the public purse for other than essential spending.

    Who do we trust? The party which got us into this mess, or the one with a plan to stimulate economic growth which is the best way to get us out of it?


    Which Province is NZ’s Food Bowl?

    July 12, 2008

    If Waikato is the food bowl of New Zealand  as Lianne Dalziel said in justifying the appointment of former MP Dianne Yates to the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Board, then the province needs to improve its marketing.

    I’d have accepted the cream can or horse racing capital, but Waitako wouldn’t immediately come to mind if I was asked which province is the nation’s food bowl.

    If we’re going for North Island entrants for the title Hawkes Bay with its wonderful fruit, vegetables, sea food and wine would be a finalist. The Bay of Plenty, Poverty Bay and Northland have a delicious range of fruit and vegetables too; and Wairarapa has wine and olives.

    In the South Island, Central Otago can claim the country’s best stone fruit, it has pip fruit and wine too. Nelson and Malborough also grow tasty fruit and have delicious sea food and wine. Canterbury produces tasty fruit and good wine too.

    Oysters put Southland on the list, though I’m not sure if swedes would be counted for or against them 🙂

    Lamb is legend in Hawkes Bay, Canterbury and Southland, though just about anywhere in New Zealand grows it just as well, and the same can be said for beef.

    North Otago may not spring to everyone’s mind as the culinary capital but we have a growing appreciation of our primary produce. There’s a fledging viticulture industry, and Fleurs Place at Moeraki has woken our taste buds to the delights of local fish and sea food. Just as the cold winters add intensity of flavour to Central’s stone fruit, the colder water enhances the flavour of fish, particularly blue cod.

    Riverstone Kitchen , a finalist in the Cuisine restaurant of the Year, uses as much local produce as possible – including fruit, vegetables and herbs, from its own orchard and garden.

    Wasabi is grown in the Waitaki Valley and it also produces very sweet strawberries, raspberries, loganberries, blackberries, tayberries and boysenberries.

    Whitestone Cheese has an array of national awards to back up my ever so slightly biased view that they produce the country’s best cheese.

    Totara Lowlands  sells the most succulent cherries I have ever eaten – they don’t export so the pick of the crop is sold locally. Their hazelnuts and honey are also top quality.

    While we’re in that part of the the district, Totara and nearby Kakanui are renowned for the vegetables from their market gardens and there are simply no better new potatoes in the world than those which grow here. They are no ordinary spuds, they’re more like underground strawberries.

    If you don’t understand how proud North Otago would be if we were called the nation’s potato patch then you obviously haven’t tasted the Jersey Bennies which grow here.


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