Rural round-up

May 26, 2016

Record-breaking 2015/16 kiwifruit season: volumes, returns grow:

The 2015/16 kiwifruit season broke records for the industry and Zespri with the biggest-ever total return to growers, highest-ever Green return per hectare and record sales volumes for both Zespri Green and Zespri SunGold Kiwifruit.

Zespri Chairman Peter McBride explains total sales revenue for the season also grew to hit $1.9 billion, up 21 percent from the previous season. The total fruit and service payment to growers for New Zealand-grown fruit increased 22 percent on the previous year to $1.143 billion, with average return per hectare reaching a record $60,758. . . 

FMA concludes assessment of complaints against Silver Fern Farms:

The Financial Markets Authority (FMA) has concluded its assessment of complaints received about Silver Fern Farms Limited (SFF) and will be taking no further action.

The FMA received a small number of complaints in April 2016 relating to Silver Fern Farms Limited and documents released to its shareholders in September 2015. A complaint was also made about the resolution approving the transaction with Shanghai Maling Aquarius Co. Ltd (Shanghai Maling).

The FMA considered whether information sent to SSF’s shareholders could be substantiated and concluded that SFF’s Notice of Meeting and Shareholder Information Pack, dated September 2015, was not misleading or deceptive. . . 

International Campaign Set to Boost NZ Dairy Exports:

A new multi-million-dollar marketing campaign has begun to educate Australian, Chinese and ultimately U.S consumers on the health benefits of New Zealand’s grass fed dairy products.

The international campaign has been launched to raise awareness of the benefits of consuming milk products from grass fed cows over those raised organically. It’s all part of the introduction of new Munchkin Grass Fed™ milk-based formula and toddler drinks. Milk matters because it is the key ingredient in infant formula and toddler milk drinks, constituting up to 65% of the powder. . . 

Higher fruit exports offset dairy fall:

Goods exports rose 4.0 percent in April 2016, up $166 million to $4.3 billion, Statistics New Zealand said today. Fruit exports led the rise, up $59 million (16 percent), offsetting a similar fall in dairy values.

Gold kiwifruit rose $53 million (53 percent), but was partly offset by a fall in green kiwifruit, down $38 million (35 percent). Apples rose $39 million (29 percent), with apple exports to Taiwan up $16 million (91 percent). Taiwan was New Zealand’s top destination for apples in April 2016, beating out the United States and the United Kingdom.

Among other export commodities, untreated logs, foodstuffs such as dietary supplements and savoury fillings, and beef and lamb all rose in value this month. . . 

Comvita to beef up honey supply in new joint venture – Sophie Boot

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand manuka honey products maker Comvita is linking up with Blenheim-based apiary operator Putake Group to form a South Island-based honey business to meet global demand for manuka honey.

The companies have signed a memorandum of understanding to form a 50:50 joint venture, named Putake Group Holdings, which would develop a wholesale honey business in the South Island, Te Puke-based Comvita said in a statement. Putake owns 1,200 hives and manages another 2,800 hives through separate joint venture arrangements. . . 

Advisory boards can offer guidance for farmers during a period of uncertainty:

As the agricultural sector grapples with high levels of dairy debt and increased volatility, Crowe Horwath’s Head of Agribusiness, Neil McAra, says farmers need to look at getting sound governance support.

McAra is a strong advocate for advisory boards which can assist farmers with the ability to make better decisions and can help improve business governance.

The value, scale and complexity of New Zealand farming operations have increased significantly over the last two decades. . . 

Rural Contractors annual conference coming up:

Rural Contractors New Zealand (RCNZ) is encouraging all of its members – and any others interested in the agricultural contracting sector – to attend its annual conference being held in the Bay of Islands later next month.

Chief executive Roger Parton says this year’s RCNZ annual conference is being held at the Copthorne Hotel and Resort, in Paihia, from June 27-30.

“The conference is now only a month away and for those who have not registered yet; now is the time to do so,” he explains. “We will be unable to hold any accommodation past the end of this month, so if people want come they need to get their registrations in now.” . . 


Rural round-up

August 1, 2014

Westland forecast follows Fonterra’s suit:

The dairy cooperative, Westland Milk Products, has charted a similar course to Fonterra’s benchmark forecast released yesterday for the current 2014/15 season, by announcing a pay-out forecast of $6 to $6.40 per kilogram of Milksolids (kg/MS).

“Given Fonterra’s announcement yesterday, farmer-shareholders on the Coast appreciate this early heads-up from our co-op,” says Renee Rooney, Federated Farme0rs Dairy chairperson.

“Even better is firming confirmation of the 2013/14 final payout in the $7.50 – $7.70 kg/MS range. Of course we’ve got retentions on top but it is set to be a good payout and Westland’s supplier communication has been pretty good. . .

Heads of Agreement and Strategic Relationship formed between Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Apa and Lincoln University:

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Apa and Lincoln University today announced the signing of a Heads of Agreement and Strategic Relationship.  This relationship agreement forms the basis for partnerships across education, training, research and commercial development.  The Ngā Wairiki-Ngāti Apa people of Whangaehu, Rangitīkei and Turakina own the Rūnanga, and have interests in seeing their people developed in all levels of the primary industries.  The Rūnanga is also keen to see the general Māori population in the region given better access to primary sector training and tertiary education.

Rūnanga Chairman Pahia Turia said that “Through our Treaty settlements we have land, and we have recently established Te Hou Farms Limited Partnership which purchased the historic Flock House farms near Bulls, early in June.  We are therefore committed investors in the primary sector, and we have a real interest in seeing our own people developed and working at all levels in the primary sector on and around our investments.” . . .

The Changing Face of the Global Dairy Industry:

Standing in front of the milk powder dryer of Oceania Dairy Limited’s new factory at Glenavy, Shane Lodge has a feeling of deja vu – but with a difference.

Shane’s 30 year career in the dairy industry has seen him involved in new plant construction for Fonterra and New Zealand Dairy Limited. The difference this time, is that Oceania’s owners are Chinese and that is a reflection of the changing face of the global dairy industry. . .

How to take the anxiety out of farm succession planning:

Many farmers put succession planning into the too hard basket because of rising capital values, but it’s a crucial process that will be a lot less fraught with danger if family members are involved in the process, says Neil McAra, Crowe Horwath’s Managing Principal – Southland.

“It’s never too early to start planning for retirement and farm succession,” said Mr McAra, who noted that one key to a successful plan was distinguishing between reward for services provided by family members and the risk/reward for ownership/investment in the business.

Another key element was for the farm owners to ensure they had considered whether they would have an ongoing role in the business, and define what that role would be.
“To alleviate the possibility of things getting off track, it is important to ensure that owners adequately plan for the future of the farm and the people within it, so that all runs smoothly and they can enjoy the transition process.” . .

Fisheries (Foreign Charter Vessels and Other Matters) Amendment Bill passes third reading:

A bill to strengthen the regulation of foreign-owned commercial fishing vessels operating in New Zealand waters has passed its third and final reading in Parliament today.

The Fisheries (Foreign Charter Vessels and Other Matters) Bill will require all foreign charter vessels to carry the New Zealand flag from 1 May 2016, and operate under full New Zealand legal jurisdiction.

“This bill will help maintain our reputation around the world. It shows that we are serious about the fair treatment of fishing crews, the safety of vessels and New Zealand’s international reputation for ethical and sustainable fishing practices,” Mr Guy says. . .

Seafood New Zealand Says Kaikoura Conservation Legislation a Community Template:

Seafood New Zealand has hailed the passage of the Kaikoura (Te Tai-o-Marokura) Marine Management Bill by Parliament today as a template for seafood and environment conservation measures throughout New Zealand.

Parliament passed the bill into law on the last day of sitting before the House rose for the election campaign.

Seafood New Zealand Chief Executive Tim Pankhurst says the legislation is designed to serve the long term interests of those who use and enjoy the Kaikoura coastline. . .

Rural Valuer recognised with top industry award:

QV registered Valuer David Paterson has had his outstanding service to the valuation profession recognised with the New Zealand Institute of Valuers (NZIV) Premier Award – the John M Harcourt Memorial Award.

Paterson, who has been a valuer for more than 30 years and is the National Manager of QV business, Rural Value, accepted the award in front of 300 attendees at the NZIV conference in Rotorua earlier this month.

He told the audience, “I feel honoured to receive this award, especially when you note some of the previous recipients.” . .

Aussie investors to sell their NZ vineyard investments:

The high value of the New Zealand dollar has motivated the Australian owners of several vineyards in the heart of New Zealand’s premier sauvignon blanc grape growing region to place two of their properties on the market for sale.

Both neighbouring vineyards are in the highly-fertile Waihopai Valley in Marlborough. The larger of the two vineyards is a 43 hectare holding – with almost 38 hectares planted in a mix of sauvignon blanc and pinot gris varieties. The second vineyard is a 36 hectare landholding planted in almost 24 hectares of sauvignon blanc grapes. . . .

 


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