Rural round-up

May 12, 2015

Initiative promotes agricultural careers – Sally Rae:

When it comes to his career, Leon Olsson’s only regret is that he did not get into the agricultural sector earlier.

Mr Olsson (26), who manages a dry stock farm at Ranfurly which is part of a large scale dairy operation, told pupils at John McGlashan College, in Dunedin, this recently.

It was part of Soil Makes Sense, an initiative supported by Lincoln University and DairyNZ aimed at promoting the opportunities available in the primary industries.

A panel of speakers outlined their own career paths and involvement in the sector. . .

New agribusiness course – Sally Rae:

The opportunities for young people to forge a professional career in the agribusiness sector are ”so diverse”, John McGlashan College principal Neil Garry says.

The Dunedin school was one of seven New Zealand secondary schools invited to become ”lead schools” for the Centre of Excellence for Agricultural Science and Business, the brainchild of St Paul’s Collegiate School in Hamilton.

The joint venture between St Paul’s and agricultural industry partners aimed to deliver and roll out an agribusiness programme to secondary schools throughout New Zealand. . .

Backing for speed limit cut:

The head of road policing is backing lowering the speed limit on many rural roads to 70 or 80 kilometres an hour in the wake of a horrendous weekend of deaths.

Ten people were killed in five separate crashes in a weekend police said was a shocking toll not seen for at least 30 years.

Assistant Commissioner for Road Policing Dave Cliff told Morning Report many roads around the country were simply not designed for the usual 100 km/h speed limit. . .

Farmers back Fonterra – Neal Wallace:

Last week Farmers Weekly gathered the thoughts of southern dairy farmers as they contemplated a winter facing low payouts while coping with the drought hangover. This week Neal Wallace and Hugh Stringleman spoke to some of their North Island counterparts to see what they are thinking. It seems they staunchly back Fonterra but that doesn’t mean they don’t have some advice on how it could improve.

When will it end?

Te Awamutu dairy farmer Brad Eyre remains convinced Fonterra is the right vehicle for the industry. It has just hit a rough patch. . .

Budget 2015: New Afforestation Grant Scheme:

The Government has today confirmed a multi-million dollar reboot of the popular Afforestation Grant Scheme (AGS), Associate Primary Industries Minister Jo Goodhew says.

The new version of the scheme will see $22.5 million invested over the next six years to encourage the planting of an expected 15,000 hectares of new forest.

“The new scheme will take up where its highly successful predecessor left off,” Mrs Goodhew says. “Farmers and landowners can again use the AGS to make better use of marginal land and increase farming diversification.”

Under the previous scheme, from 2008 to 2013, more than 12,000 hectares of new forest was planted, much of it on erosion prone land. This improved water quality and reduced the impact of severe flooding. . .

Gypsy Day – Effluent Management Doesn’t Stop at the Farm Gate:

Waikato Regional Council is reminding dairy farmers of the importance of good stock effluent management during the upcoming Gypsy Day on 1 June.

That’s the day when thousands of cows will be transported from one farm to another, meaning potential for effluent to spill on to roads creating hazardous driving conditions.

To help reduce the amount of stock effluent produced in transit, the council stresses the importance of preparing animals prior to transport, including not giving them green feed for 4 – 6 hours before their journey. . .


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