Rural round-up

03/09/2021

Pine plantations extend lifetime of methane in North Island atmosphere :

North Island pine forests are prolonging the life of methane in the local atmosphere by as much as three years, climate researcher Jim Salinger says.

Dr Salinger said new computer modelling showed New Zealand had underestimated the impact of methane in its greenhouse gas emissions and would need to set tougher targets for methane reduction.

The modelling showed compounds called monoterpenes emitted by pine plantations in the North Island were extending the life of methane in the New Zealand atmosphere from 12.5 years to 15 years.

Dr Salinger presented the research to Parliament’s Environment Select Committee today. . . 

The Covid glitch in our supply chains – Sharon Brettkelly:

Our farm-to-fork process is usually highly efficient. But the Delta variant has blown a hole in the security of our supply chains, sparking questions about what changes are needed.

Rod Slater was only eight years old when he became part of the meat supply chain in New Zealand.

From his father’s butcher shop in Mt Albert, Auckland, he would head out on his bike with the meat parcels in the front basket to deliver to customers.

The 75-year-old recently retired chief executive of Beef + Lamb New Zealand remembers his first delivery to a rest home when he had to crash his bike to stop it, and the meat came tumbling out. . . 

Common sense prevails over grazing rules :

Just days into her new role as National’s Agriculture spokesperson, Barbara Kuriger is pleased to see common-sense is prevailing in Southland.

The Government’s proposed intensive winter grazing (IWG) rules for Southland, were due to come into effect in May, but were deferred in March for one year, after the farming sector deemed them ‘unworkable’.

Last Thursday, the Government announced it’s now going to adopt almost all the changes put forward by the Southland Winter Grazing Advisory Group — which is made up of ag sector representatives.

A consultation document was also released and is now open for feedback on the Ministry for the Environment website. Submissions close on October 7. . .

What New Zealand farmers can teach the world – Jacqueline Rowarth:

Global food security is on a razor’s edge, but Kiwi farmers can show other countries what can be achieved whilst continuing to make more improvements down on the farm, writes Jacqueline Rowarth.

Recent food price increases in New Zealand are small in comparison with the rest of the world. The 2.8 per cent increase to the year ended July 2021 in New Zealand is nothing in comparison with the 31.0 per cent reported for the global Food Price Index by the FAO over the same time frame.

Even before the Covid-19 pandemic, food insecurity worldwide was on the rise.

The Economist’s Intelligence Unit (EIU) Index released at the beginning of the year stated that the pandemic threatens to erase “progress made in the fight to eliminate global hunger and malnutrition”. . . 

Hawkes Bay farmers watching gathering signs of a third big dry – Sally Murphy:

Conditions in Hawke’s Bay are being described as extremely dry as farmers prepare for another warm, dry spring.

For the past two years the region has been in drought over summer and it is looking like farmers could face a third.

Hawke’s Bay Federated Farmers president Jim Galloway said they’ve only had about 280mm of rain so far this year.

“Underfoot it’s very dry, a lot drier than normal and certainly for this time of year. Some areas had a little bit of rain yesterday but it’s only enough to wet the top. . . 

Farms left with 70,000 surplus pigs amid labour crisis:

Labour shortages at abattoirs have resulted in a surplus of 70,000 pigs on farms across the country, the National Pig Association has warned.

The lack of available workers at processing plants is causing a significant surplus of pigs stuck on farms, the trade body said.

Most plant workers – the majority being eastern European – have gone back to their home countries following Covid-19 travel restrictions and Brexit uncertainty.

Meanwhile, pig producers are continuing to struggle with record costs and negative margins that have persisted since the start of the year. . . 


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