Rural round-up

24/05/2016

Imports threaten exports – Neal Wallace:

Exports of New Zealand sheep genetics to Australia will effectively stop while officials there consider the risk of scrapie.  

They were worried about it reaching NZ in sheep milking genetic material imported from Britain.  

Trade in genetics between NZ and Europe had been closed for 20 years following the outbreak of scrapie in sheep and BSE, also known as mad cow disease, in cattle but the fledgling sheep milking industry wants access European genetics which produce five times the volume milk of NZ flocks. . . 

Fonterra working on rebuilding trust:

Fonterra executives admit they need to listen more to rebuild the public’s trust in the company.

The dairy giant outlined its international marketing strategy to 800 farmers at a DairyNZ farmers’ forum near Hamilton today.

The company said it’s using social media to target young global consumers with different nutritional needs. . . 

Young Māori dairy farmer Jack Raharuhi changes direction and wins award –  Gerard Hutching:

A young farmer who confesses he “got into the wrong crowd as a teenager and chose the wrong path” has been crowned the 2016 Ahuwhenua Young Māori dairy farmer of the year.

Jack Raharuhi, hailing from the Ngati Kahu, said winning a prestigious award such as the Ahuwhenua was a huge honour.

“I got into the wrong crowd as a teenager and I chose the wrong path. I left school and came to work here on the farm which I now manage. Dairy farming got me in line. I had no time to go out and get into trouble. Now I have a fiancée and two children,” he said in Hamilton at the awards ceremony last night. . . 

Rakaia farm takes Awuwhenua Trophy:

A South Island dairy farm has won the prestigious Ahuwhenua Trophy for the first time in the 83-year history of the competition.

The winner of the Maori Excellence in Farming Award dairy was the Proprietors of Rakaia Incorporation, whose farm Tahu a Tao has a long and proud history dating back to 1886.

The 216ha property near Ashburton runs around 830 Kiwi cross cows. . . 

Dog trailist a legend in his lifetime – Rob Tipa:

Rob Tipa meets a three-time national dog trials champion and farmer who knows what he likes and knows how to breed it.

Three-time New Zealand champion dog trialist Ginger Anderson, of Omarama, is a man who understands pedigrees and good breeding, whether he is talking about top trial dogs, fine wool sheep or charolais cattle.

He qualified for his first national dog trial championship 51 years ago, the youngest competitor to qualify at just 19, after winning the North Otago Centre and South Island championships. . . 

Hazelnuts offer nitrogen option:

Hazelnut trees’ potential to soak up nitrogen leaching will be revealed at three workshops over the next few weeks.

Farmers will be able to learn more about how hazelnut trees can fit into their farm management plans.

Hazelnut Growers Association chairman Murray Redpath, an Eastern Bay of Plenty sheep and beef farmer and hazelnut grower, says hazelnuts need nitrogen and their spring growth relies on having enough stored in their roots and plant tissues. . . 

New trophy for Young Farmers:

This year’s FMG New Zealand Young Farmers winner will hoist a new trophy, complete with number 8 wire.

A brand new trophy for the contest was unvelied earlier today as part of an official blessing in Canterbury.

“In constructing the trophy FMG and NZ Young Farmers wanted to honour the tradition of the contest and our proud farming heritage as well as acknowledge the pivotal role farming plays in terms of New Zealand’s current and future prosperity,” FMG chief executive Chris Black said. . . 

Horsetail weevil to rein in field horsetail weed:

The Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) has approved the horsetail weevil (Grypus equiseti) as a biological control agent to help curb the weed field horsetail (Equisetum arvense).

Field horsetail is an invasive species with green fern-like fronds that grow up to 80cm tall. Though it dies back in winter, it has a large underground root system that makes it difficult to control. It also produces large quantities of spores that can germinate on bare ground, threatening native plants in sensitive habitats, such as wetlands and on the banks of waterways. It is classed as an unwanted organism under the Biosecurity Act 1993. . .


Rural round-up

13/06/2012

Sustainability Helpful in mix no matter what style – Sally Rae:

Good farming in New Zealand should be celebrated – no matter what approach a farmer takes.

That is the message from Prof Henrik Moller from the Centre for Sustainability: Agriculture, Food, Energy, Environment at the University of Otago.

Prof Moller is part of the Agricultural Research Group on Sustainability (Argos), a joint venture between the AgriBusiness Group, Lincoln University and the University of Otago. . .

Hazelnuts’ potential discussed – Sally Rae:

Hazelnut growing could deliver returns exceeding those from dairy farming if growers could achieve the yields and orchard management cost efficiencies achieved in Chile, Oregon and Italy.

That is the message from Hazelnut Growers Association of New Zealand (HGANZ) chairman Murray Redpath, who was in Central Otago recently for the organisation’s annual meeting. . .

Meat season hits the wall – Allan Barber:

Settlement of the industrial dispute at AFFCO barely came in time to beat the passing of the season’s processing peak. Contrary to expectations that the supply of cattle, particularly cull dairy cows, would last until the end of June at least, the flow has virtually dried up.

After 34 weeks of the meat year which runs from 1 October to 30 September, slaughter volumes for all species are below both last season and the five year average.

While there are variations between islands and species, the only stock types which have a chance of exceeding last year’s national total are lamb and prime steer. If this occurs it will only be by the slimmest of margins.

Award winning young farmer hopes to inspire:

A  22-year-old self-employed dairy farmer hopes his success through winning a new Maori farming award will inspire other young, troubled Maori to follow their dreams.

Tangaroa Walker, who has strong cultural links in Tauranga district (Ngati Ranginui/ Ngati Pukenga/ Pirirakau), won the Ahuwhenua Young Maori Trainee/Cadet award recently.
The award was created to encourage young Maori workers between 16 and 25 to move into leadership roles. . .
 
Italian tomato dumping has small impact on NZ market – Hannah Lynch:

June 11 (BusinessDesk) – The dumping of Italian processed tomatoes onto the New Zealand market has been found to have little impact, according to a Ministry of Economic Development report.

Heinz Watties Limited, which sells canned tomatoes under the Watties and Oak brands, made a complaint about dumping of Italian tomatoes with the ministry in July 2011. The report, “Dumping Investigation, Preserved Tomatoes Investigation” found that one, a producer called Conserve Italia Agricultural Cooperative Society, had dumped the products.

“There is evidence of an increase in the volume of dumped imports in absolute terms and in relation to production in New Zealand,” the report said. “There is evidence of only a slight increase in dumped import volumes relative to consumption in New Zealand.” . . .

Orchard joins FON programme:

A SECOND focus orchard has been established in Gisborne as part of the Zespri Focus Orchard Network (FON) programme.

Designed to bring growers the latest research information, the programme involves monitoring growing conditions in Gisborne and will help demonstrate how to produce the new varieties of kiwifruit.

Management of both orchards is geared toward improving productivity and a new financial system on the orchard will provide an analysis of orchard management decisions, says Zespri’s communication spokesperson, Rachel Lynch.

Search for ideal clover – Jill Galloway:

 

A plant breeder says finding the parent clovers of New Zealand’s white clover could lead to an to agricultural plant better adapted for farming.

 

AgResearch Grasslands Palmerston North clover specialist Warren Williams said it may enable them to better breed a drought-tolerant, low fertility and low temperature-growing white clover.

 

New Zealand white clover was a mainstay of agriculture and was worth more than $2 billion to farming each year, Dr Williams said.

 

“That was years ago, probably, with dairying expansion, it is close to $3b each year now.” . . . 


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