What’s not going on in the blogosphere?

December 13, 2009

Monkey with Typewriter has disappeared.

The Tumeke! blogosphere rankings haven’t been updated since October. That’s an observation, not a complaint. Tim Selwyn must have put hundreds of hours into compiling the stats and if he chooses to stop doing so that’s entirely up to him.

And today Kiwiblog has only one post – the general debate. That’s also an observation not a complaint. If the country’s most prolific blogger wants a day off he’s entitled to have it, but it’s most unusual for David to disappear without telling the world. 

What’s going – or in this case – not going on in the blogosphere and why?


Electoral finance reform

September 29, 2009

The process for the reform of electoral finance is so much better than it was for the now ex-Electoral Finance Act.

Aiming to get good law rather than handicap the opposition is a good start; and consultation, discussion and genuine attempts to get cross-party support ought to result in something fairer and enduring.

Justice Minister Simon Power has released a proposal document for discussion.

* Broadcasting allocation – I don’t support any public funding of political parties and their activities. Whether or not there is any public funding, parties, other groups and individuals should be free to spend their own money on broadcasting should they choose to do so.

* MPs’ work vs electioneering:

The Parliamentary Service Commission is considering these issues as part of the process for developing a permanent definition of funding entitlements for parliamentary purposes in the Parliamentary Service Act 2000; in addition, the Speaker of the House has recently convened a cross-party committee that has developed a public disclosure regime for Parliamentary Service funding.  

 The Government proposes to ensure consistency between the Parliamentary Service Commission’s work and the work undertaken as part of the electoral finance reform by raising the suggestions made in the submissions with this cross-party committee for further consideration.

It is often difficult to distinguish between parliamentary activities and electioneering. During the election period any advertising which is paid for by Parliamentary Services should be restricted to factual information which helps constituents such as electorate office hours.

* Campaign expenditure limits haven’t changed since 1995. they need to be raised to take account of bigger electorates which were established by MMP and be adjusted for inflation.

* Regulated campaign period – should not advantage the governing party and should not be retrospective.

* Disclosing identity of promoter – requiring a real name is reasonable. I am not sure why it is necessary to also have an address on the material, especially for parties which all have registered offices.

Other discussion on the proposals can be found at Kiwiblog  , SOLO (where Lindsay Perigo is not impressed),  Not PC (who agrees with Lindsay; and Monkeywithtypewriter (who applauds the cross-party approach)


Did you see the one about . . .

September 23, 2009

Friday motivation: Life = Risk  at Motella.

The Year 2050 at No Minister where Gooner says it’s time to cut to the core.

The daffy ambition of turning gold to blue – Alf Grumble digs up some facts on bulb breeding.

That was my suggestion! – Kiwiblog looks at negotiations on the 3 strikes policy.

Sensible shoes a safety issue – the Hand Mirror discusses heels high & low.

More court secrecy – Stephen Franks isn’t impressed by name suppression.

Wowser Alert! Destroy all those cute photos of the kids!!!! – Opinionated Mummy calls for common sense.

Get your free immigration advice here!! – Monkey with Typewriter wasn’t impressed with the service.


Did you see the one about . . .

September 2, 2009

Governance not management  at Stephen Franks including the key compenents of a successful board.

Incentives matter: famine file  at Anti Dismal which illustrates the importance of private property.

Raising good kids at Not PC – taking a positive approach to parenting.

Comment of the week  at No Minister – a look back at Labour’s legacy sourced from a comment at Kiwiblog.

It can be over so quick at rivettingKate Taylor – sudden death and responsible babysitting.

Hands up if you fell for . . . at Monkey with Tpyewriter – looking at the havok didn’t happen.

Capping Incomes at Something Should Go Here – one for the doesn’t learn from history file.

New Zealand Professionals – Fillipinos of London at Cactus Kate – observations and advice on a successful OE.

Cheesecake and trim latte at goNZoFreakpower – the dilemna diet indulgence.

Nanny States at Macdoctor – a three point checklist for differentiating between nanny & necessary.

The Brussels Gestapo at Frenemy – Germans see the light on lightbulbs.


Shame

August 4, 2009

Former MP and Minister outside cabinet Phillip Field has been found guilty  of 26 charges.

Field, former MP for Mangere, was found guilty of 11 of 12 charges of bribery and corruption as an MP after the Crown said he had Thai nationals carry out work on his properties in return for immigration assistance between November 2002 and October 2005.

He was also found guilty of 15 of 23 charges of wilfully attempting to obstruct or pervert the course of justice. The charges related to his evidence to an inquiry into the work on his homes.

Crown Prosecutor Simon Moore is correct when he says:

“This has been a really important case, and bribery and corruption strikes very much at the heart of who we are as a people.”

The case is a nasty blot on our democratic fabric not just because Field is the first person found guilty of corruption as an MP but because of the way then Prime Minister Helen Clark and her Labour colleagues sought to protect him and hobble the Ingram Inquiry into allegations against him.

Kiwiblog has done an excellent post detailing what happened and when, concluding with:

Long before the Police investigation, the Labour Party should have denounced Field. Instead Clark, Cullen and the rest of the Labour Party defended him. That is why these convictions are their shame.

This would also be a good time for all MPs to come together and declare this should never happen again, and support an Independent Commission against Corruption that can investigate abuses of office by parliamentarians, senior officials and agencies.

The call for an Independent Commission against Corruption is seconded by Whaleoil.

Keeping Stock says:

And sadly, we can no longer claim to be a country where our politics are free from corruption. That will be Taito Phillip Field’s legacy to New Zealand, and to the Pasifika people he purported to represent.

Roarprawn asks:   He is the first but will he be the last?

No  Minister says (and shows): A good day for Tui.

Oswald Bastable says: Official – there is corruption in NZ politics.

PM of NZ notes: Only guilty of trying to help.

UPDATE: Fairfacts Media posts on The Guilty Party.

                  Macdoctor posts on Dishonour.

                 Dim Post says The Only Thing Taito Phillip Field is Guilty of is Corruption.

                Something Should Go Here highlights the Gobsmackingly Dishonest Quote of the Day.

UPdate 2:

              Monkeywithtypewriter posts In Praise of Ingram.

             Stephen Franks writes Reflections on Field’s Corruption.


Political compass

June 7, 2009

 The one thing which stands out when I do multi choice tests like the political compass is that I don’t like black and white answers because my response to many of the questions is but/providing/if. . .

That said, I’ve done two versions of the political compass and come out in a similar position as a right moderate social libertarian.

This one is the political spectrum quiz:

 dairy 10001

This is the political compass (which I found ages ago through Monkeywithtypewriter)

pol-compass

I’m left of Freidman and right of Ghandi on the economic spectrum but on a similar level to both on the social one.

I’m also a bit further right and more liberal than Halfdone at Something should go here and Lucia Maria at NZ Conservative and well to the right and more liberal than Dave at Big News .

P.S. – Halfdone is interested in compiling a chart of where bloggers sit on the compass.


Did you see the one about. . .

June 7, 2009

 Pipe specification  at Somethingshouldgohere

Unintentional arrogance at Open Parachute

Why economics is hard  at The Visible Hand

Worthy pursuits – cough at Rob’s Blockhead

5 ways for banks to improve their on-line banking services  at Interest.Co.NZ

S59 amendment vitimises 2nd parent at Monkeywithtypewriter

Significant risk factor for child abuse omitted at Lindsay Mitchell

Hating on Teh Fatties at In A Strange Land

Weird Art Quiz at Artandmylife

A car quiz at Not PC

Ground rules in the first, second and third person at The Hand Mirror

Undomestic godess at Pundit

A puff too far  at Macdoctor

And a couple of newish  (to me) blogs:

Beverlyspills

Birdsofparadise – from Nicole Were, a New Zealander living in Yellowknife in the northwest of Canada (interviewed for the best song segment on Afternoons by Jim Mora on Thursday)


Remembering Mothers Day – updated

May 10, 2009

That National Party Mainland Conference opened this morning with a recognition of all the mothers present.

Several bloggers have acknowleged their, or other people’s mums with a post:

Monkeywith typewriter qutoes Corinthians For Mums Everywhere

Frenemy posts on his plans for Moms Day (and because the mother in question is American he can get away with Mom rather than Mum).

PM of NZ has a Small Test for Mothers Day (though the connection between the test and Mothers Day escapes me).

I hope all the other mother-bloggers are enjoying the day and that the non-mother bloggers are too busy making sure their mothers enjoy the day to blog.

Warm thoughts to those who no longer have a mother, and special mention and aroha for Hekia Parata MP and her whanau who are mourning the loss of  their mother who died last week.

UPDATE: M&M posts on her Mothers Day

                    Deborah posts on Celebrating Mothers Day  at The Hand Mirror and on More Pinkification of Mothers at In A Strange Land

 

UPDATE 2- Lindsay Mitchell wants a get off my back & out of my face day.


Did you see the one about . . .

May 1, 2009

The Next Einstein won’t be British  at NZ Conservative

Why is science important?  at Open Parachute

A Green Conundrum  at Frenemy

Alcohol & Addiction Part II at the Visible Hand in Economics

Incentives Matter Bible File  at Anit-Dismal

Gob.Smacked  at The Hand Mirror

The Great Tamiflu Swindle  at Monkey with Typewriter

Press complaint: exploitation of mental illness at Kiwipolitico

Autumn in the Park  at Half Pie

Compounding errors  at Kismet Farm


Did you see the one about . . .

March 27, 2009

The Wool Over our Eyes at NZ Conservative – does the Dim Post have a rival for satire?

Clark to take Tizard to New York at The Dim Post

Tall Poppies & Patriots at MonkeyWithTypewriter

Are nations just larger unions at The Visible Hand in Economics

How economics can get you a date at Anti-Dismal

ACC & the oh-shit circuit  and The dipstick a 21st century measurement system at Frenemy

The Slow Death of GP Services at Macdoctor

Biffo on the bog at Inquiring Mind

If you can imagine at Rob’s Blockhead

Land as woman at The Hand Mirror

One of the beauties of having a small brain . . .  at Laughy Kate


The money or the holiday

March 25, 2009

Some of our staff take all the holidays owing to them and more; we have to insist others take all they’re entitled to.

Those who take extra time off won’t be affected by the proposal to allow workers to choose the fourth week’s holiday or an extra week’s pay; those who aren’t keen to take what they’re eligible for will happily take the money instead of  packing a bag for a  fourth week off.

Four weeks holiday plus 11 statutory days off adds up to six working weeks plus a day off work in a year. Not everyone wants that much so now they’ll have a choice of taking the money instead.

The existing policy gives workers a vacation which many turn into a staycation, because they can’t afford to go away. National’s policy will enable them to choose a paycation instead.

It’s each worker’s choice, and if blogs are anything to go by this is clearly understood by those on the right but not on the left.

Kiwiblog approves the move and notes the fear and ignorance from opponents. 

Keeping Stock  agrees with the Herald editorial.

Oswald Bastable will be happy to take the cash and use it for his annual holiday.

Whaleoil is please the government will let employees buy back holidays.

The Visible Hand in Economics thinks it’s an excellent policy, thinks the Greens have got it wrong and has a more detailed discussion.

Monkeywithtypewriter may not consider himself politically right but he’s right on this when he says four weeks entitlement, pull the other one.

Meanwhile the sky is falling on the left where:

Bomber at Tumeke! doesn’t understand that the four week’s entitlement doesn’t kick in until a year has been worked so has nothing to do with the 90 day trial period.

No Right Turn takes a very jaundiced view  of employers.

And The Standard is doesn’t believe in good faith.


Did you see the one about . . .

March 21, 2009

What to do when you suspect adultery at Monkey with typewriter.

Sceptical housewifery at In A Strange Land.

In praise of the eloquent insult at Not PC.

Spider du jour at Half-Pie (anachrophobics shouldn’t follow the link).

TVNZ. . .  What to do at Watching Brief (sound like a good idea to me).

You have to be joking at Frenemy.

Sentence of the day at Quote Unquote.


Aint nothing like a Dame or a Knight

March 8, 2009

It wasn’t an election pledge but several months ago John Key did say National might review the honours system.

They have and the result is a reinstatement of titular honours.

The new system will apply from June and the 85 people who were appointed Principal and Distinguished Companions *1 of the New Zealand Order of Merit between 2000 and 2008 will be given the choice of accepting a title.

When this change was mooted last October I wrote:

The egalitarian in me balks at hereditary titles, but I am more warmly disposed to those people have earned.

There may be arguments about some who’ve got honours but they are the exceptions because most are deserved.

I had the privilege of sitting on a board with Sir Robin Gray and recently had dinner with friends where Sir Brian Lahore was also a guest. Both enhance the honour rather than the reverse and I think that is true for most recipients.

However, whether or not titles are reintroduced I would like a change to the current system which few understand.

If we’re going to have our own honours we should make them properly our own and award our brightest and best the Order of the Kiwi.

That would be a fittingly New Zealand way of honouring someone without getting too effusive because the recipients would then be Jo (or Joe) Bloggs OK 🙂

I haven’t changed my mind on any of that and hope the reinstatement of titular honours is the first step towards a New Zealand system of honours which is less wordy and more easily understood than the current one.

And given it’s International Women’s Day when we might be considering gender equality – it’s time some thought was given to what to call the spice*2 of those who are honoured.

The correct address for the wife of a Sir Whoever What’sit is Lady What’sit not Lady Herownname. The husband of a Dame stays a Mister and I don’t think the partners of those in a civil union or who are partners in life but not by law rate in the etiquette books.

I am sure that most of those honoured would give their spice some of the credit so I’m not totally averse to them gaining a special honourific in recognition of their other half’s honour – but either all spice gain one or none.

*1 – whoever came up with that longwinded explanation for good bloke/blokess needs to go back to communication school.

*2 – spice: a plural noun which covers more than one spouse or partner.

UPDATE: Stephen Franks  wonders:

whether any of the Labour notables who’ve disparaged “imperial honours” but honoured themselves with post-colonial orders that now convert back into Knight and Dame-hoods, will have the grace to decline John Key’s generous invitation?

He also notes that the Order of New Zealand was created as a non-titular honour so people like Jim Bolger and Jonathan Hunt won’t have to resist the temptation to have a title.

UPDATE 2: Monkeywithtypewriter reckons being able to choose is choice.


Why on earth would they do this?

March 7, 2009

If you had an uneconomic business to sell and knew that the government which was most likely to buy it was also the one least likely to be there after an impending election, how keen would you be do do a deal with it?

Very.

And being very keen, would you be hard to deal with?

No.

Would you even be prepared to compromise on what you were prepared to accept rather than risk having no deal at all if the government changed?

Almost certainly.

Why then did Labour, spend so much more on what has become AlbatrossRail than it was worth when Toll Holdings would have been very, very willing sellers?

And given that, why on earth would anyone consider appointing Michael Cullen to the board of an SOE when he has demonstrated his lack of business acumen not just with this purchase and the ACC blow out but nine years of wasted opportunities?

I’ve just got back from Wellington and have come across the story late in the day so am not surprised so many other blogs have covered it and are united in their condemnation of the idea:

Keeping Stock says No John No

Kiwblog has problems with this  and comes up with more appointments for the government to consider.

No Minister says No, no, no  and asks is NZ now a Fools Paradise?

Roarprawn is aghast.

Cactus Kate calls it a National disgrace.

NZ Conservative suggests another job with a lot less pay.

Oswald Bastable also suggests another job.

Anti-Dismal sees politics where there should be commerce.

Barnsley Bill hopes it’s a joke.

Inquiring Mind says Absolutely bloody outrageous.

PM of NZ isn’t being tribal.

Whaleoil says No way.

UPDATE: Monkeywithtypewriter thinks this is all a personal PR campaign for Cullen.


Did you see the one about . . .

March 6, 2009

The latest in milking technology at NZ Conservative.

Press freedom by Karl du Fresne

Extraordinary times ahead for  Fonterra at Roarprawn

The Fat Controller & Lassie at Monkeywithtypewriter

Political ignorance and policy preferences at Anti-Dismal 

Unethical Ethics at Macdoctor and the related It takes 12 to Qango at goNZofreakpower


What’s in a number?

March 2, 2009

Monkey with Typewriter is discouraged by a lack of feedback so has written his last post.

I’m sorry because I enjoy his satirical view.

Some of the fun in blogging is the feedback and it’s easy enough to count comments but it’s harder to gauge readership because some people check blogs through RSS readings rather than visits. And while I won’t pretend to understand how Alexa gets its numbers I’ve noticed they don’t seem to have any correlation with the Sitemeter stats.

In spite of a ranking of 12 in Half Done’s February blog ranking,  and a rise of three to 12th in Tumeke’s January ranking ,  Homepaddock is at 23 in Open Parachute’s rating   and I could be upset by the apparent fall or happy to be so high when there’s hundreds of NZ blogs around.

But what stands out for me is not the places but the difference between them. If you look at the gulf between Kiwiblog’s well-deserved grasp on the top spot and compare the numbers of visitors, posts and comments that keep him there with mine I’m just paddling in the shallows.

That doesn’t matter to me. I enjoy the feedback and appreciate comments, I also check visitor stats now and then and like it when they increase but if my blogging depended on numbers of either or both I’d have given up months ago.

UPDATE: MWT fans can relax, the monkey has had second thoughts.


Valentine’s Day doesn’t have to be commercial – updated

February 14, 2009

Year by year the commercial hype around Valentine’s Day – and all the other days which have joined the calendar of celebrations – increases.

But it doesn’t have to be that way, you can show the one you love that you love him/her without spending a cent.

My farmer reckons it’s better to know you’re loved every day rather than have a fuss made of you just once a year – although given it’s also my birthday there may be some degree of self interest in his philosophy 🙂

Apropos of the day Quote Unquote displays a fractual Valentine, Monkeywithtypewriter has a history lesson, The Hand Mirror talks about the tempest   and the suckiness  , Bitsonthe side has uncovered a chocolate shrinkage  in sweets and if it’s Cactus Kate you’re trying to impress, don’t do it by text.

Update:

Anti-Dismal has found 20 reasons it’s okay to hate Valentines Day and reckons it’s better to just give money. While not averse to receiving money, giving love has greater value at no cost 🙂


What do you do when the evidence proves you wrong?

February 12, 2009

Mike Moore writes that the ability to change one’s mind is a virtue.

The great economist, Lord Keynes, was once challenged at a media event – they had the “gotcha” press even back then.

How, he was asked, could he justify his statement when just a few years ago he had said the opposite ? “When the evidence proves I’m wrong, I change my mind.

What do you do ?” he replied sweetly.

The rest of the colum would be instructional reading for the Greens because of its economic message and because they’re the only party in parliament that won’t accept the evidence about how bad the Electoral Finance Act was and will be voting against its repeal.

Until their blind support for the EFA I had thought the Greens were principled. Their attachment to that dog’s breakfast changed my mind and their refusal to support its repeal confirms I was right to do so.

Inquiring Mind  points out the Green’s disdain for democracy, Monkeywithtypewriter reminds us of exactly who was to blame for the Act and lists its faults; and Keeping Stock  celebrates the Act’s demise.


Mars and Venus

February 2, 2009

If proof was needed that men and women come from different planets it’s the posts and comments on yesterday’s Herald editorial  at The Hand Mirror  and Monkeywithtypewriter.

Apropos of that I offer an illustration of the comprehension void between men and women which came in an email, I’m not sure who to credit as the author though some websites attribute it to  Dave Barry.

The Difference Between Men & Women

 

Let’s say a guy named Roger is attracted to a woman named Elaine. He asks her out to a movie; she accepts, they have a pretty good time.

 

A few nights later he asks her out to dinner, and again they enjoy themselves. They continue to see each other regularly and after a while neither one of them is seeing anybody else.

 

And then one evening when they’re driving home, a thought occurs to Elaine and without really thinking she says it aloud: “Do you realise that as of tonight, we’ve been seeing each other for exactly six months?”

 

And then there is silence in the car. To Elaine, it seems like a very loud silence. She thinks to herself: Gee, I wonder if it bothers him that I said that. Maybe he’s been feeling confined by out relationship; maybe he thinks I’m trying to push him into some kind of obligation that he doesn’t want, or isn’t sure of.

 

And Roger is thinking: Gosh. Six months.

 

And Elaine is thinking: But hey, I’m not so sure I want this kind of relationship, either. Sometimes I wish I had a little more space so I’d have time to think about whether I really want us to keep going the way we are, moving steadily toward … I mean, where are we going? Are we just going to keep seeing each other at this level of intimacy? Are we heading towards marriage? Toward children? Toward a lifetime together? Am I ready for that level of commitment? Do I really even know this person?

 

And Roger is thinking: … so that means it was … let’s see, February when we started going out, which was right after I had the car at the dealer’s which means …lemme check the odometer …Whoa! I am way overdue for an oil change here.

 

And Elaine is thinking: He’s upset. I can see it on his face. Maybe I’m reading this completely wrong. Maybe he wants more from out relationship, more intimacy, more commitment; maybe he has sensed, even before I sensed it, that I was feeling some reservations. Yes, I bet that’s it. That’s why he’s so reluctant to say anything about his own feelings. He’s afraid of being rejected.

 

And Roger is thinking: And I’m gonna have them look at the transmission again. I don’t care what those morons say, it’s still not shifting right. And they better not try to blame it on the cold weather this time. What cold weather? It’s 87 degrees out, and this thing is shifting like a goddamn garbage truck and I paid those incompetent thieves $600.

 

And Elaine is thinking: He’s angry. And I don’t blame him. I’d be angry too. God, I feel so guilty, putting him through this, but I can’t help the way I feel. I’m just not sure.

 

And Roger is thinking: They’ll probably say it’s only a 90 day warranty. That’s exactly what they’re gonna say, the scumballs.

 

And Elaine is thinking: Maybe I’m just too idealistic, waiting for a knight to come riding up on his white horse, when I’m sitting right next to a perfectly good person, a person I enjoy being with, a person I truly do care about, a person who seems to truly care about me. A person who is in pain because of my self-centred, schoolgirl romantic fantasy.

 

And Roger is thinking: Warranty. They want a warranty? I’ll give them a goddamn warranty/ I’ll take their warranty and stick it right up their …

 

“Roger,” Elaine says aloud.

“What?” says Roger, startled.

 

“Please don’t torture yourself like this,” she says. Her eyes beginning to brim with tears. “Maybe I should never have … Oh God I feel so ….” (She breaks down, sobbing).

 

“What?” says Roger.

 

“I’m such a fool,” Elaine sobs. “I mean there’s no knight. I really know that. It’s silly. There’s no knight and there’s no horse.”

 

“There’s no horse,” says Roger.

 

“You think I’m a fool, don’t you?” Elaine asks.

 

“No!” says Roger, glad to finally know the correct answer.

 

“It’s just that … It’s just that I … I need some time,” Elaine says.

 

(There is a 15 second pause while Roger, thinking as fast as he can, tries to come up with a safe response. Finally he comes up with one that he thinks might work).

 

“Yes,” he says.

 

(Elaine deeply moved, touches his hand).

 

“Oh Roger, do you really feel that way?” she says.

“What way?” says Roger.

“That way about time,” says Elaine.

“Oh,” says Roger. “Yes.”

 

(Elaine turns to face him and gazes deeply into his eye, causing him to become very nervous about what she might say next, especially if it involves a horse. At last she speaks.

 

“Thank you, Roger,: she says.

“Thank you,” says Roger.

 

Then he takes her home and she lies on her bed, a conflicted, tortured soul and weeps until dawn whereas when Roger gets back to his place, he opens a bag of Doritos, turns on the TV and immediately becomes deeply involved in a return of a tennis match between two Czechoslavakians he’s never heard of.

A tiny voice in the far recesses of his mind tells him that something major was going on back there in the car but he is pretty sure there is no way he would ever understand what and so he figures it’s better if he doesn’t think about it. (This is also Roger’s policy regarding world hunger).

 

The next day Elaine will call her closest friend, or perhaps two of them, and they will talk about this situation for six straight hours. In painstaking detail, they will analyse everything she said and everything he said, going over it time and time again, exploring every word, expression and gesture for nuances of meaning, considering every possible ramification.

 

They will continue to discuss this subject, off and on, for weeks, maybe months, never reaching any definite conclusions, but never getting bored with it, either.

 

Meanwhile, Roger, while playing squash one day with a mutual friend of his and Elaine’s will pause just before serving, frown, and say: “Norm, did Elaine ever own a horse?”

 


Psychosclerosis sightings

November 16, 2008

Cases of psychosclerosis abound.

Chris Trotter’s and Steve Braunias  must have been in the grips of it when writing their columns in last week’s Sunday Star Times.

Then Michael Cullen played Muldoon.

Monkeywithtypewriter  spotted a serious outbreak at The Standard.

Simon Cunliffe had such a bad attack that the ODT added this to the end of his weekly column:

Simon Cunliffe is assistant editor at the Otago Daily Times. His views are entirely his own.

And Inquiring Mind came across classic symptoms in a letter to the editor.

But all is not lost. It is possible for those suffering from psychoslerosis to overcome their affliction as Chris Trotter shows:

Who is served by an ideology that refuses to recognise that crucial aspect of the human spirit which refuses to accept the brute statistical reality that many are called but few are chosen?

Are we socialists, in our drive for an absolute equality of outcomes, really willing to descend to the level of a certain species of crab which will, when collected in a bucket, seize and haul back into the doomed mass any individual that attempts to escape its fate by climbing out?

Should John Key’s mother be condemned for instilling in her son the notion that, with lots of hard work and a little luck, he could transcend his state house roots?

Is that why so many other New Zealanders raised in state houses voted against Helen Clark’s Labour-led government last Saturday?

Because, somehow, they had got it into their heads that she would be happier if they never left them? Never climbed out of the bucket?

Or, God forbid, that Labour’s social-democratic state was actually about seizing them in its claws and dragging them back down into it?

But alas, he’s had a relapse in today’s SST.

I can’t find it on line but in his column he shows an inability to see past his own prejudice which is a classic symptom of psychosclerosis.

He’s writing about the deal between National and the Maori Party. He reckons Maori are betraying their roots but if he wasn’t afflicted by psychosclerosis he’d be able to see it as the historic opportunity for progress which is how those with a more positive outlook regard it.


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