Rural round-up

July 11, 2017

China’s returning appetite for dairy set to benefit NZ producers – Visiting Chinese dairy expert:

After a two-year hiatus from the global dairy market, China’s appetite for dairy commodity imports is starting to revive, and this will create opportunities for New Zealand, particularly at the higher-end of the market, according to a visiting Chinese dairy expert.

In New Zealand for a series of industry presentations, Rabobank Shanghai-based senior dairy analyst Sandy Chen said China’s appetite for dairy commodity imports is starting to pick-up at a time when global supply across the export engine is returning to growth. . . 

Wool industry hits hard times – Peter Fowler:

Wool prices have hit rock bottom, causing a lot of stress and emotion in the industry, says a Hawke’s Bay wool broker.

Wright Wool managing director Philippa Wright has been in the industry 40 years and said she can’t think of a time when prices have been lower.

Ms Wright said the wool sale at Napier yesterday was very disappointing.

“We are now at a lower point than we’ve ever been in my memory. Six years ago it was around about this level but yesterday I think it went a bit lower.

“The shorter wools are at an all time low but yesterday we saw the longer wools, the better coloured wools, the carpet type wools actually drop as well and quite significantly,” she said. . . 

Farming must adapt for climate change, Nat’s candidate says – Mike Mather:

Tim van de Molen might be looking to inherit a safe National Party seat, but that does not automatically mean he is as staunchly conservative as his predecessors or – likely – some of his contemporaries.

The 34 year old, who officially launched his election campaign in Matamata on Saturday afternoon, is quick to admit that climate change is a reality and more needs to be done to deal with it.

He is also “leaning toward” the decriminalisation of euthanasia, but is less swayed by those calling for the decriminalisation of cannabis for recreational use.

“I don’t think we should be taxing something that could be causing health issues,” he said. . . 

Bayer Young Viticulturist of the Year – two more contestants go through to the National Final:

Congratulations to Anthony Walsh from Constellation who became the Bayer Marlborough Young Viticulturist of the Year 2017 on Thursday 6 July. At 29 this was the last year Walsh could enter so he was more determined than ever to take out the title this year as it was his last opportunity to go through and represent Marlborough in the National Final. He is thrilled all his hard work paid off.

Matthew Gallop, also from Constellation, took out second place and Shannon Horner from Marisco came third, so a great achievement for both of them too. . .  

Hawkes Bay Syrah crowned the champion of the world:

Hawkes Bay wine producer Rod McDonald Wines has won the Champion Red Trophy for its Quarter Acre Syrah 2015 at the world’s most influential wine awards – the International Wine Challenge (IWC).

The winery was already noted for scooping four trophies for its Quarter Acre Syrah 2015, including Best International Syrah, Best New Zealand Syrah, Best New Zealand Red and Best Hawkes Bay Syrah. The Champion Trophy was selected by the IWC Chairmen after re-tasting all the trophy-winning wines. The last time a New Zealand winery won a Champion Red Trophy was in 2013. . . 


Rural round-up

April 13, 2015

Shearing king David Fagan calls time – Libby Wilson:

Shearing king David Fagan had a fitting send-off to his competitive career last night, cheered on by a capacity hometown crowd in his final shear in Te Kuiti.

Having shorn 26,000 sheep in the course of his 640 open wins stretching back 37 years, the 16-time national champion put down the handpiece after contesting the Running of the Sheep in his Te Kuiti home.

His final contest came against his nephew James Fagan, whose father John beat David to second place in the 1984 Golden Shears. . .

Running of the sheep craws big crowd to Te Kuiti – Mike Mather:

A mob of hundreds of determined sheep made their way down Te Kuiti’s main street on Saturday, flanked by thousands of cheering humans.

The ovine athletes were the unwitting participants in the Running of the Sheep, an annual event that is part of the town’s Great New Zealand Muster, held to celebrate its claim of being the country’s sheep capital, and which also includes the New Zealand Shearing Championships.

Although a tad skitterish at the start of their run, the flock behaved in a very un-sheeplike manner, running straight and true down the centre of Rora St, through the centre of the town.

Waitomo District Council community development co-ordinator Donna Macdonald said she was very impressed with the behaviour of both the 342 four-legged runners and their two-legged audience. . .

Nitrate absorption trialled – Allison Beckham:

Scientists are trialling a filter system which they hope will provide dairy farmers with a simple and cost effective way of removing nitrates and phosphorus before they reach waterways.

A nitrate catcher was commissioned recently near Waituna Lagoon, southeast of Invercargill, and a phosphorus catcher will be built nearby soon. . . .

Blazed a trail in sales – Sally Rae:

Looking back, Katrina Allan wonders how she ever managed to juggle motherhood with work and tertiary study.

But, with a determination to finish her university studies before her son started his, Mrs Allan (44) did manage, finishing a year before he started, although she joked that she never wanted to see another textbook again.

Mrs Allan has the distinction of being the first female salesperson at Alliance Group, having worked for the company for 17 years. . .

Securing Glenfern Sanctuary’s future:

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry has announced the Government will contribute towards a joint bid to buy Glenfern Sanctuary on Great Barrier Island for the nation.

The Nature Heritage Fund, which is allocated at the Minister’s discretion, will put a significant amount of funding towards a consortium including the Auckland Council and Great Barrier Local Board looking to purchase Glenfern.

The sanctuary, in Port Fitzroy in the north of the island, was founded by the late sailing champion Tony Bouzaid in 1992 and is now for sale. . .

We don’t know how lucky we are – Chris Lewis:

As New Zealand Dairy farmers we often take for granted the sophistication of our industry and the relative ease we have in producing food for the nation and the World. April will not be one of those months for me.

I received a phone call last month from a Tear Fund organiser about this woman who was coming over from Sri Lanka to talk about the benefits of a project that has been designed and supported by TEAR Fund and the New Zealand Government, with Kiwi expertise to improve milk quality.  She is Selina Prem Kumar and is the Director of the successful dairy project in Sri Lanka. Her story will shock and move you.

The Wanni Dairy Regeneration programme she heads, started during the protracted civil war in Sri Lanka, has brought together both Singhalese and Tamil small hold dairy farmers for the common purpose of raising their incomes and revitalizing the dairy industry which stalled during the conflict. . .

A hill lambing made simple:

Zan Kirk, from Low Kilbride, in Dumfries, has struck upon a novel way of making hill lambing that little easier if you are dealing with small numbers, perhaps on the scale that smallholders deal with.

‘There comes a time in everyone’s life when things need to be made easier, computers help in many ways, but not with lambing. So here is the fail-safe way to a simple, stress-free lambing – keep your pet lambs and lamb them!
We have been doing this for some time now and most of our flock started out life as pet lambs. This removes the inherent fear that most sheep have of humans and means that, as we are getting on and still lambing outside, if we need to catch a ewe, most respond to a ‘shoogle’ of cake. They can then be caught, popped into the transport box and taken up to the shed to be lambed in comfort, and with warm water.
On Sunday, my most pet ewe lamb from last year lambed, albeit not in the best place – right in the middle of the field! I wandered up, asked her if she needed some help and she just sat there pushing. I helped lamb her, saw the lamb was breathing fine, told her how clever she was, gave her an hour and brought her into the shed for her tea and toast. . .


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