Jobs go, jobs come

04/03/2014

Dunedin had some good news yesterday:

Dunedin’s Wall Street mall is to be redeveloped to cater for an expansion of Fisher & Paykel’s operation in the city, which is expected to provide about 70 jobs.

The whiteware company wants to extend its existing lease of office and laboratory space in the Dunedin City Council-owned Wall Street complex in George Street.

This is to provide the design and call centre with capacity for a total of 230 staff, enabling the continuation of a growth plan that will see a 40% increase in design staff numbers by 2018. . .

Another good news story:

Dunedin-based cancer diagnostic company Pacific Edge is to receive $4.5 million in government grants towards research and development over the next three years.

Pacific Edge’s bladder diagnostic tool Cx-bladder is marketed in New Zealand, Australia, the US and soon Europe, and the listed Dunedin company holds patents for diagnostic and prognostic tests across a range of cancers, including colorectal, gastric and melanoma.

Pacific Edge chief operations officer Jimmy Suttie said the Government’s Callaghan Innovation Fund recognised the ability of Pacific Edge to turn scientific discovery into products which brought real benefits. . . .

It also had some bad news:

A sawmill company with about 400 employees and about $100 million in annual sales has been placed in receivership.

Brendan Gibson and Michael Stiassny, of KordaMentha, were this afternoon appointed as receivers of Dunedin-headquartered Southern Cross Forest Products.

The company has four sites in Mosgiel, Milton, Balclutha and Milburn around Dunedin and another site in Thames. In 2012, the last figures available, the company generated revenue of just under $95m. . .

There’s no good time to be worried about job security but it’s not as bad if job growth is strong.

Businesses come and go and so do jobs, and at the moment there’s more coming than going.

 

Photo: More jobs, more opportunities. Under National, New Zealand is going in the right direction. http://www.national.org.nz/bga.aspx


Landcorp not preferred bidder for Crafar farms.

14/07/2010

Landcorp’s bid for the Crafar farms has been rejected by the receivers.

Receivers Michael Stiassny and Brendon Gibson of KordaMentha confirmed today that over 50 offers were submitted on all or parts of the portfolio from a range of buyers.

They were pleased with the strength of the offers, however Landcorp was not among the preferred tenders, they said in a brief statement.

Good.

The SOE should not be competing with private businesses and individuals in land acquisition and it should be gradually reducing its landholding, not increasing it.

As I said here and here, the  $1668.7m it has invested in farms returned only $10 million by way of  a dividend to the public coffers last year.

That capital would give a better return for agriculture and the country as a whole if it was spent in areas such as research and initiatives to encourage more students in agriculture and related fields.


Key tops Listener power list

01/12/2009

It’s no surprise that Prime Minister John Key tops the Listener’s top 10 in its 2009 Power List.

The panel says he is:

being identified by leadership scholars as pioneering an entirely new style of political leadership in this country. Sceptics may cite his pragmatism as evidence of overt risk-aversion, but so far his reasonable, moderate demeanour and light-handed management has worked magic for the Government’s standing. He has been the polar opposite of Helen Clark, resisting both the micromanagement of others’ portfolios and playing favourites in the caucus. His cheerful tolerance of coalition partners’ ructions – “The bulk of people who come into politics have type-A personalities!” – has saved National from being embroiled in their crises.

Bill English is second followed by Alan Bollard, Rodney Hide, Steven Joyce and Rob Fyfe.

Then comes Michael Stiassny, the country’s senior receiver. The introduction to the list explains:

Perhaps the most telling detail about this year’s Power List . . .  is that a receiver (Micahel Stiassny) comes in at No 7. Yes, it has been a tough year; a year when debt became a dirty word, when old power bases were weakened by the recession. . .

Tariana Turia is ninth then John Whitehead and Peter Jackson. The top 10 has an 11th place – it’s filled by Phil Goff.

Then there’s those who have been delisted:

Craig Norgate who was 4th in the Business and economy section last year; Andrew West who was 3rd in agriculture  and Pat Snedden who was 4th in health and medicine.

The panel that selected the 2009 almanac of influence was chaired by Listener senior write Rebecca Macfie. Members were Lynn Freeman who hosts Radio NZ’s arts programme; Karl Du Fresne, Chris Wikaira, director of PR firm Busby Ramshaw Grice; Jane Clifton; Jacqueline Rowarth, Director of Agriculture at Massey; Bernard Hickey, Alan Isaac who chairs NZ Cricket, is a director of Wakefield Health, trsutee of NZ COmmunity Trust, chair of McGrathNicol & Co and advisor to Opus International; and Stephen Franks.

The full list and commentary won’t be online until Boxing Day. I subscribe to the magazine and if I didn’t I’d fork out the $3.90 for this issue.


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